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Inner dome of the Jain temple at Walkeshwar, Mumbai
Inner dome of the Jain temple at Walkeshwar, Mumbai

Mumbai has one of the largest populations of Jains among all the cities in India. Mumbai also has numerous Jain temples. One of the best known is the Babu Amichand Panalal Adishwarji Jain Temple, Walkeshwar (Malabar Hill).

Jains are among the most prosperous communities in Mumbai, with a number of big businesses owned and industries dominated by them.

On Mahavira Janma Kalyanak of 2019, more than 108 Sanghas of Mumbai together hosted Varghoda which ended at Godiji Parshvanath temple.

Godiji Parshwanath Temple

Main article: Godiji

The Godiji Parshwanath Temple in Pydhonie is one of the oldest Jain temple in Mumbai, constructed in 1812. The white idol of the mulnayak Tirthankar Godi Parshwanatha was brought from an ancient temple at Hamirpur in Rajasthan.

Religious organisations

Main article: Dakshin Bharat Jain Sabha

The Dakshin Bharat Jain Sabha is a religious and social service organisation of the Jains of South India. The organisation is headquartered at Kolhapur, Maharashtra, India.[1] The association is credited with being one of the first Jain associations to start reform movements among the Jains in modern India.[2][3] The organisation mainly seeks to represent the interests of the native Jains of Maharashtra (Marathi Jains), Karnataka (Kannada Jains) and Goa.

See also

References

  1. ^ Bhanu, B. V. (2004). People of India: Maharashtra - Kumar Suresh Singh - Google Books. ISBN 9788179911006. Retrieved 30 January 2013.
  2. ^ Carrithers, Michael; Humphrey, Caroline (4 April 1991). The Assembly of Listeners: Jains in Society - Google Books. ISBN 9780521365055. Retrieved 30 January 2013.
  3. ^ Markham, Ian S.; Sapp, Christy Lohr (26 May 2009). A World Religions Reader - Google Books. ISBN 9781405171090. Retrieved 30 January 2013.