Joe Burrow
refer to caption
Burrow with the Cincinnati Bengals in 2021
No. 9 – Cincinnati Bengals
Position:Quarterback
Personal information
Born: (1996-12-10) December 10, 1996 (age 26)
Ames, Iowa, U.S.
Height:6 ft 4 in (1.93 m)
Weight:215 lb (98 kg)
Career information
High school:Athens (The Plains, Ohio)
College:
NFL Draft:2020 / Round: 1 / Pick: 1
Career history
Roster status:Active
Career highlights and awards
NFL records
  • Most completions in a game by a rookie: 37
  • Career completion percentage: 68.2%
Career NFL statistics as of Week 18, 2022
Passing attempts:1,530
Passing completions:1,044
Completion percentage:68.2%
TDINT:82–31
Passing yards:11,774
Passer rating:100.4
Player stats at NFL.com · PFR

Joseph Lee Burrow (born December 10, 1996) is an American football quarterback for the Cincinnati Bengals of the National Football League (NFL). Following a stint with Ohio State, Burrow played college football at LSU, where he won the Heisman Trophy and the 2020 College Football Playoff National Championship as a senior. He was selected by the Bengals first overall in the 2020 NFL Draft.

After an injury-shortened rookie season, Burrow rebounded in his second year by leading the Bengals to their first playoff win since 1990, ending the longest active drought in the four major North American sports, and an appearance in Super Bowl LVI. Noted by sportswriters and other players for his swagger and calmness under pressure, Burrow has been nicknamed "Joe Cool" and "Joe Brrr".

Early years

Burrow was born in Ames, Iowa, on December 10, 1996,[1][2][3] the son of Robin and Jim Burrow. Jim is a former football player and coach whose career lasted over 40 years.[4] Burrow was born in Ames when his father was on the coaching staff at Iowa State University.[5] According to a 2019 Sports Illustrated story, "The Burrow athletic lineage dates back nearly a century." In the 1940s, his paternal grandmother set a Mississippi state high school record with an 82-point game in basketball.[6][7] His paternal grandfather played basketball at Mississippi State; his uncle, John Burrow, played football at Ole Miss (the University of Mississippi); and two older brothers also played football at Nebraska.[8]

He attended the 2002 Rose Bowl at age five, as his father was an assistant coach for the University of Nebraska in Lincoln. Not long after, he began playing in youth football leagues. Unlike his father, uncle, and brothers, who all played on defense, Burrow started out as a quarterback, because his first youth team had no one else who could play the position.[8] The Burrow family moved to North Dakota in 2003 when his father was hired as the defensive coordinator at North Dakota State University in Fargo. One day, while Jim was visiting his office, future Central Michigan head coach Dan Enos commented that the seven-year-old Joe had a future in football.[9] The Burrows spent two years in Fargo before Jim accepted the defensive coordinator position at Ohio University in Athens.[10]

Burrow attended Athens High School (2011–14) in The Plains, Ohio, leading the school to three straight playoff appearances and the school's first seven playoff victories in school history.[11] During his career, he passed for 11,416 yards with 157 passing touchdowns and rushed for 2,067 yards with 27 rushing touchdowns.[12] He was awarded the state's Mr. Football Award and Gatorade Player of the Year award as a senior in 2014. He and his Bulldog teammates went 14–1 that season. He was also a standout basketball player, and was named first-team all-state at point guard his senior year.[11] Burrow was rated as a four-star football recruit, and was the eighth-highest ranked dual-threat quarterback in the class of 2015, according to the 247Sports Composite.[13] He committed to Ohio State to play football on May 27, 2014.[14][15]

In December 2019, the Athens City School District school board unanimously approved a measure to rename the school's football stadium in honor of Burrow.[16]

College career

Ohio State

After redshirting his first year at Ohio State in 2015, Burrow spent the next two years as a backup to J. T. Barrett, during which he played in 10 games, completing 29 of 39 passes for 287 yards and two touchdowns.[17]

During Ohio State's spring game in 2018, Burrow completed 15 of 22 pass attempts for 238 yards and two touchdowns.[18] The game was further part of Ohio State's competition for the starting quarterback position, contested by Burrow, Barrett, and Dwayne Haskins.[18] Following the game, Burrow told reporters "I didn't come here to sit on the bench for four years. I know I'm a pretty good quarterback. I want to play somewhere."[18] Realizing that Haskins would be named starting quarterback at Ohio State, Burrow transferred to Louisiana State University (LSU) on May 18, 2018.[19][20] Burrow had graduated from Ohio State in three years with a degree in consumer and family financial services, and would be immediately eligible as a graduate transfer.[21]

LSU

Burrow with LSU in 2018
Burrow with LSU in 2018

2018

In his first year at LSU, Burrow was named the starting quarterback as a redshirt junior in 2018.[21] In an early season road trip to then-No. 7 Auburn, Burrow threw for 249 yards and a touchdown en route to a 22–21 win. He was named SEC Offensive Player of the Week following the victory.[22] He again earned SEC Offensive Player of the Week honors following a 292-yard, three-touchdown performance against Ole Miss two weeks later.[23] Burrow played in LSU's 7-overtime and 5-hour long loss to Texas A&M.[24] After the game, Burrow experienced fatigue and had to be receive IV therapy from trainers.[24] Burrow helped lead the Tigers to a 10–3 record, including a win over UCF in the Fiesta Bowl, and a No. 6 ranking in the final AP Poll. Burrow finished the season with 2,894 yards passing, 16 touchdowns, and five interceptions. He added 399 rushing yards and seven rushing touchdowns.[25]

2019

Burrow was again named LSU's starting quarterback heading into his redshirt senior season in 2019. In the Tigers' season opener against Georgia Southern, Burrow threw for 278 yards and five touchdowns in a 55–3 win, and was later named SEC Co-Offensive Player of the Week (with Tua Tagovailoa).[26] In a Week 2 road trip to ninth-ranked Texas, Burrow threw for 471 yards, four touchdowns, and an interception in a 45–38 win. His 471 yards were the second-most in school history and the most since Rohan Davey's 528 against Alabama in 2001.[27] He was named Walter Camp National Offensive Player of the Week and SEC Offensive Player of the Week following the performance.[28] Burrow earned his third SEC Offensive Player of the Week honors on September 21 during LSU's game against Vanderbilt. He threw for 398 yards and a school-record six passing touchdowns in the Tigers' 66–38 win.[29] He became the first LSU quarterback to throw for over 350 yards in three consecutive games.[30]

In a 42–6 win over Utah State, Burrow threw for 344 yards and five touchdowns, and became the first Tiger quarterback to throw for 300-plus yards in four consecutive games.[31] The streak came to an end the next week against seventh-ranked Florida, but Burrow's 293 yards and three touchdown passes helped lead the Tigers to another win, 42–28.[32] The next week, in LSU's seventh game of the season, Burrow eclipsed the LSU single-season passing touchdowns record of 28 when he added four more in a win against Mississippi State.[33] In their next game, Burrow led LSU against ninth-ranked Auburn and LSU defeated another top 10 opponent, as Burrow's 321-yard, two-total-touchdowns performance set a new school record of eight career 300-yard games.[34]

Burrow (center) with LSU head coach Ed Orgeron (left) and linebacker Patrick Queen (right) at LSU's 2020 National Championship post-game press event
Burrow (center) with LSU head coach Ed Orgeron (left) and linebacker Patrick Queen (right) at LSU's 2020 National Championship post-game press event

When LSU played Alabama on November 9, the two schools were ranked higher than they had been since they had played in the 2012 BCS National Championship Game; LSU was ranked second and Alabama third when the season's inaugural College Football Playoff rankings had been released the prior week. The game would also feature two leading candidates for the Heisman Trophy in Burrow and Alabama quarterback Tua Tagovailoa.[35] Burrow and the Tigers came away victorious in a 46–41 shootout. Burrow passed for 393 yards and three touchdowns in the game,[36] and was again named Walter Camp National Offensive Player of the Week and SEC Co-Offensive Player of the Week, sharing the latter with teammate Clyde Edwards-Helaire.[37]

The following week against Ole Miss, Burrow threw for 489 yards and five touchdown passes, and his single-season passing yards surpassed the LSU record set by Rohan Davey in 2001. Burrow also set an LSU record for consecutive completed passes with 17 during the game.[38] On November 30, Burrow and LSU secured an undefeated regular season with a 50–7 win over Texas A&M, in which Burrow threw for 352 yards and three touchdowns. During the game, he broke the SEC record for single-season passing yards – previously set by Kentucky's Tim Couch – and tied the conference record for single-season touchdowns (which had been set by Missouri's Drew Lock).[39] Burrow took sole possession of the SEC single-season touchdown record the following week in the SEC Championship Game, throwing for four touchdowns in LSU's 37–10 win over Georgia that secured the Tigers' place in the College Football Playoff.[40]

Burrow at the White House in 2020
Burrow at the White House in 2020

On December 14, 2019, Burrow was awarded the 2019 Heisman Trophy, receiving 1,846 more votes than runner-up Jalen Hurts.[41] It was the largest victory margin in the history of the award, and Burrow received the greatest-ever share of available points.[42] Burrow's Heisman acceptance speech referred to the rampant poverty and food insecurity affecting his hometown; shortly after his speech, the Athens County food bank was the recipient of $450,000 in donations.[43] Other awards he won that year include the Maxwell Award, Walter Camp Award, Johnny Unitas Golden Arm Award, Davey O'Brien Award, Lombardi Award, and Manning Award.[44]

In LSU's College Football Playoff semifinal game against fourth-ranked Oklahoma in the 2019 Peach Bowl, Burrow threw for seven touchdowns during the first half of the contest and had a total of 493 passing yards – along with scoring a rushing touchdown – in a 63–28 victory for the Tigers.[45] Burrow's eight total touchdowns were all scored within the first 35 minutes [46] of the 60-minute game, after which the quarterback was taken out for the sake of giving him rest.[47] Analysts have called the performance one of the greatest in college football history.[48][49]

In the 2020 National Championship Game against Clemson, Burrow threw for 463 yards with six total touchdowns, five of which were passing, which led LSU to a 42–25 victory and him being named the game's offensive MVP.[50] He finished his 2019 season with 60 passing touchdowns, which broke the single-season FBS record previously set by Colt Brennan's 58 in 2006.[50][n 1] Burrow also set a FBS single-season record with 65 total touchdowns (which would be tied by Zappe in 2021).[52][51] His 5,671 passing yards is now tied (with Case Keenum in 2009) for fourth-most in an FBS season.[50] His passer rating of 202 for the season was a record at the time.[50][53] Several sportswriters deemed the season to be the greatest ever by a college quarterback.[54][55][56][57]

Collegiate statistics

Legend
CFP national champion
Led the NCAA
Bold Career high
Season Team Games Passing Rushing
GP GS Record Cmp Att Pct Yds TD Int Rtg Att Yds Avg TD
Ohio State Buckeyes
2015 Ohio State 0 0 Redshirted
2016 Ohio State 5 0 22 28 78.6 226 2 0 169.9 12 58 4.8 1
2017 Ohio State 5 0 7 11 63.6 61 0 0 110.2 3 −5 −1.7 0
LSU Tigers
2018 LSU 13 13 10–3 219 379 57.8 2,894 16 5 133.2 128 399 3.1 7
2019 LSU 15 15 15–0 402 527 76.3 5,671 60 6 202.0 116 384 3.3 5
Career 38 28 25–3 650 945 68.8 8,852 78 11 172.4 259 836 3.2 13

Professional career

Burrow in a game against Washington, November 2020
Burrow being carted off following a season-ending knee injury during his 2020 rookie season
Pre-draft measurables
Height Weight Arm length Hand span Wonderlic
6 ft 3+12 in
(1.92 m)
221 lb
(100 kg)
30+78 in
(0.78 m)
9 in
(0.23 m)
34[58]
All values from NFL Combine[59]

Burrow was one of 58 players invited to the 2020 NFL Draft, where he was selected first overall by the Cincinnati Bengals.[60][61] He was the third-consecutive Heisman-winning quarterback to be selected first overall, following Baker Mayfield and Kyler Murray.[62] Burrow signed his four-year rookie contract, worth $36.1 million, on July 31, 2020.[63]

2020

See also: 2020 Cincinnati Bengals season

Prior to the season, Burrow was considered the favorite to win the NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year award.[64][65][66]

Burrow was the only rookie quarterback from his draft class to start on opening week.[67] In his debut, Burrow threw for 193 passing yards and an interception, while adding 46 rushing yards and a rushing touchdown in a 16–13 loss against the Los Angeles Chargers.[68] During the next game against the Cleveland Browns, Burrow threw his first career passing touchdown, a 23-yard pass to tight end C. J. Uzomah. Although the Bengals lost the game, 35–30, he attempted 61 passes, completing 37 of them for 316 yards and three touchdowns, which broke the NFL record for most completions by a rookie quarterback in a single game.[69][70] Two weeks later, Burrow earned his first career win by defeating the Jacksonville Jaguars. He also became the first rookie quarterback to throw for 300 or more yards in three straight games.[71]

In a Week 7 game against the Browns, Burrow had 406 passing yards, three passing touchdowns, one rushing touchdown, and one interception in a 37–34 loss.[72] He became the first rookie in NFL history with at least 400 passing yards, three passing touchdowns, and a rushing touchdown in a single game,[73] and had completed more passes (221) than any other player in NFL history during their first eight games.[74] In the second half of a Week 11 game against the Washington Football Team, Burrow was hit low while throwing a pass and subsequently tore his ACL and MCL in his left knee, among other damage to his PCL and meniscus.[75][76] He was later placed on injured reserve, ending his rookie season.[77] Undergoing knee surgery in December, Burrow continued to review game film despite being out for the season.[78]

2021

See also: 2021 Cincinnati Bengals season

Burrow playing against the Baltimore Ravens in 2021
Burrow playing against the Baltimore Ravens in 2021

On September 6, the Bengals confirmed Burrow had completed his rehab and would start Week 1.[79] Burrow returned from his injury and helped lead the Bengals to a 2–1 start. In Week 4, Burrow completed 25 of 32 passes for 348 yards and two touchdowns in a 24–21 win over the Jacksonville Jaguars, earning AFC Offensive Player of the Week.[80]

Against the Baltimore Ravens in Week 16, Burrow completed 37 of 46 passes, threw for a career-high 525 yards, while also throwing four touchdowns without an interception, for a career-high 143.2 passer rating in the 41–21 win. Burrow's 525 yards were the fourth most passing yards in a game in NFL history, and broke Boomer Esiason's franchise record for most passing yards in a game as a result.[81] The victory in this game was Cincinnati's ninth of the year, clinching the first winning record for the team since the 2015 season, and put the Bengals in first place of the AFC North. Burrow was named AFC Offensive Player of the Week as a result of his performance.[82]

The next week against the Kansas City Chiefs, Burrow threw for 446 yards, four touchdowns, and no interceptions in the 34–31 win. The win helped the Bengals clinch the AFC North and a playoff berth for the first time since 2015.[83] Burrow finished the season playing in 16 games with 4,611 passing yards and 34 passing touchdowns, both franchise records.[84] He also led the league in completion percentage (70.4%) and yards per pass attempt (8.9), but also led the league in sacks taken.[85]

In his playoff debut, Burrow threw for 244 yards and two touchdowns in the 26–19 win against the Las Vegas Raiders in the Wild Card round, ending the Bengals' playoff win drought that had been active since the 1990 season.[86] During the Divisional round against the top-seeded Tennessee Titans, Burrow threw for 348 yards and an interception in the 19–16 win, which was the first time in franchise history the Bengals won a playoff game on the road.[87] The victory occurred despite Burrow being sacked nine times, tying Warren Moon in 1993 for the most times sacked in a playoff game and becoming the most-sacked quarterback to win a playoff game.[88] In the AFC Championship Game against the Kansas City Chiefs, Burrow threw for 250 yards, two touchdowns, an interception, and helped the Bengals overcome a 21–3 deficit to win 27–24 in overtime. The 18-point comeback was tied with the Indianapolis Colts in 2006 for the largest in a conference championship.[89] With the victory, the Bengals reached Super Bowl LVI, their first appearance since Super Bowl XXIII in 1988.[90] In the Super Bowl, Burrow threw for 263 yards and a touchdown, but was sacked 7 times, ultimately losing to the Los Angeles Rams 23–20.[91] Burrow set a playoff record for most times sacked in a single postseason, being sacked 19 times, surpassing the previous record set by Wade Wilson in 1987, with 14.[92]

2022

See also: 2022 Cincinnati Bengals season

In Week 1 against the Pittsburgh Steelers, Burrow committed a career-high five turnovers, which included losing a fumble and throwing four interceptions, along with being sacked seven times in the 23–20 overtime loss.[93] In Week 7 against the Atlanta Falcons, Burrow finished the game throwing for 481 yards in the 35–17 win.[94] The game was Burrow's fifth game with over 400 passing yards, setting an NFL record for the most 400-yard games in a player's first three seasons. It was also his second game with over 500 yards of offense and four touchdowns, making him the first player to accomplish this multiple times.[95] Burrow was named AFC Offensive Player of the Week as a result of his performance.[96]

In Week 13, Burrow threw for 286 yards and two touchdowns, along with 46 rushing yards and a touchdown in a 27–24 win over the Chiefs, earning AFC Offensive Player of the Week.[97] On December 21, Burrow was selected to the Pro Bowl for the first time in his career.[98] In Week 16, Burrow threw for 375 yards and three touchdowns in a 22–18 win over the Patriots, earning his third AFC Offensive Player of the Week honor of the season.[99]

Due to the team's Week 17 game against the Buffalo Bills being declared a no contest, the Bengals were declared AFC North champions ahead of their final week match against Baltimore, marking the first time the franchise won consecutive division titles.[100] He finished the season ranked 5th in the NFL in both completions (414) and passing yards (4,475), while his franchise record 35 touchdown passes ranked in 2nd.[101][102] Meanwhile, the Bengals finished 12–4 on the season, their best record since 2015.[103]

In the 2022–23 NFL playoffs, Burrow led the Bengals to victories over the Baltimore Ravens and Buffalo Bills en route to their second consecutive AFC Championship game.[104][105] In a rematch of the previous AFC Championship game, the Bengals lost to the Kansas City Chiefs.[106]

NFL career statistics

Legend
NFL record
Led the league
Bold Career high

Regular season

General Passing Rushing Sacks Fumbles
Year Team GP GS Record Cmp Att Pct Yds Avg TD Int Rtg Att Yds Avg TD Sck SckY Fum Lost
2020 CIN 10 10 2−7−1 264 404 65.3 2,688 6.7 13 5 89.8 37 142 3.8 3 32 231 9 4
2021 CIN 16 16 10−6 366 520 70.4 4,611 8.9 34 14 108.3 40 118 3.0 2 51 370 5 2
2022 CIN 16 16 12−4 414 606 68.3 4,475 7.4 35 12 100.8 75 257 3.4 5 41 259 6 3
Career 42 42 24−17−1 1,044 1,530 68.2 11,774 7.7 82 31 100.4 152 517 3.4 10 124 860 20 9

Postseason

General Passing Rushing Sacks Fumbles
Year Team GP GS Record Cmp Att Pct Yds Avg TD Int Rtg Att Yds Avg TD Sck SckY Fum Lost
2021 CIN 4 4 3−1 97 142 68.3 1,105 7.8 5 2 97.3 11 31 2.8 0 19 137 0 0
2022 CIN 3 3 2–1 72 109 66.1 721 6.6 4 2 89.3 15 70 4.7 1 10 60 0 0
Career 7 7 5−2 169 251 67.3 1,826 7.3 9 4 93.8 26 101 3.9 1 29 197 0 0

Player profile

"Burrow is considered a relatively quiet, occasionally quirky guy. But he's beloved in the LSU locker room, largely because he plays with a competitiveness that borders on fanatical."

 –Robert Mays of The Ringer in a profile about Burrow (November 2019).[107]

At the NFL combine, Burrow was measured to be 6 ft 3 in and 221 lbs; his hands were measured to be 9 inches.[59] In 2021, Sports Illustrated writer Mike Santagata wrote that Burrow is "bigger than he looks at about 230 pounds," while also noting his athleticism and strength.[108]

Through his junior year at LSU, Burrow "initial run through the [NFL's] scouting machine resulted in such an underwhelming consensus".[107] Many scouts viewed Burrow as an "NFL draft afterthought", and considered him "a late-round project and potential backup."[107] He was seen as having limited physical traits and average production prior to his senior season.[107] SEC analyst Jordan Rodgers opined that Burrow was "wildly inconsistent, and frankly very poor against good competition" in 2018.[109] Burrow's 2019 season was cited as helping draw more attention to scouts to reconsider their evaluation of him,[107] and his football IQ, accuracy, pocket mobility, and playmaking outside of the pocket have all been cited as strengths of his game.[110] The Bengals caught attention of these traits in 2019, making Burrow a top pick in the 2020 NFL Draft.[110][108]

Football IQ

Burrow's football IQ has often been cited by writers, coaches, coordinators, and other players as a critical aspect of Burrow's game. He has been analyzed as being capable of processing opposing defenses quickly.[108] Burrow participated in game plan meetings during his tenure at LSU to discuss the next opponent, where he pitched game plan ideas with LSU passing game coordinator Joe Brady and offensive coordinator Steve Ensminger.[109] The two coaches also trusted Burrow with presnap play calls and Burrow was noted by Sports Illustrated for his tendency to "often change receiver routes based on defensive formations."[109] College GameDay analyst Kirk Herbstreit likened Burrow to a "co-offensive coordinator", stating "That's the NFL model, when you have a quarterback able to invest and communicate at that level. [Burrow] is the cutting edge of that mold. When I watch LSU, it's not just Joe Brady's offense—it's Joe Brady and Joe Burrow's offense."[109]

Burrow plays chess in his spare time, as well as during game preparation. He keeps a chessboard in his locker.[111] Prior to Super Bowl LVI, Burrow played ten matches of chess on Chess.com.[112] Bengals cornerback Chidobe Awuzie, who would play chess with Burrow, commented "The fact that he plays chess lets you know that he's able to prioritize certain things and articulate things very fast and have formation recognition."[111]

Accuracy and physical traits

Burrow delivers a throw
Burrow delivers a throw

Sportswriters have praised Burrow's accuracy, calling his ball placement elite.[108] Bengals offensive coordinator Brian Callahan has stated that Burrow has "an uncanny ability to place the ball accurately on the move anywhere on the field."[110] Charlie Goldsmith of The Cincinnati Enquirer wrote that Burrow possess elite traits in regards to his "combination of picking up the blitz and his accuracy outside the pocket".[110]

Indeed, Burrow's pocket management, particularly his movement and footwork within the pocket to help him avoid sacks, has been noted by sportswriters.[108] The Athletic wrote positively of Burrow's "ability to work a broken pocket," stating that Burrow evades defenders and is able to both find space to deliver a throw or run with the ball himself.[113]

Intangibles

Intangibles such as dedication, work ethic, and leadership also contributed to the Bengals' decision to pick him first overall.[78] Former New England Patriots running back Kevin Faulk compared Burrow to Tom Brady, noting the former's poise and competitiveness.[109] Once in the NFL, Burrow drew further comparisons to Brady from Chiefs defensive coordinator Steve Spagnuolo.[114]

Burrow's leadership has also been noted by teammates and opponents alike; veteran Mike Daniels spoke on Burrow being voted a team captain as a rookie, stating that Burrow earned the respect of his veteran teammates before even playing.[115] Kansas City Chiefs quarterback Patrick Mahomes has stated "Not only is he a great football player, I think he's a great leader. He has that special knack where he can lead anybody."[114] Mahomes and Baltimore Ravens linebacker Patrick Queen have also noted Burrow's "swag" or "swagger".[114][116] Indeed, Burrow has been noted by writers for his "cool" demeanor both on and off the field.[117][118] ProFootballTalk writer Peter King wrote that "Burrow's steely mentality and his right arm are putting him on the path to greatness. I wouldn't bet against him."[119] Burrow's attitude has been attributed as a factor in his ability to remain calm under pressure in-game, earning him the "Joe Cool" and "Joe Brrr" nicknames.[120][121][122]

Records and achievements

NFL records

Bengals franchise records

Personal life

Burrow during an interview with Lordstown Motors
Burrow during an interview with Lordstown Motors

Burrow spent one summer during college interning at Goldman Sachs.[24] After signing his rookie contract with the Bengals, Burrow stated that he planned to save all of his contract money and instead live through income received from endorsements.[129]

Burrow is a fan of the Super Smash Bros. video game series.[130] In an interview in 2023, Burrow stated that he usually plays Super Smash Bros. Ultimate on flights to road games with his teammates, and that he frequently plays as Ness from Earthbound.[131]

Burrow is an avid fan of Kid Cudi, often listening to his music prior to Bengals games.[132] In February 2022, Burrow appeared on-stage with Cudi during a Super Bowl afterparty.[133] Later in the year, Cudi included a bonus track named after Burrow on his Entergalactic album.[134]

In the wake of the Roe v. Wade being overturned in June 2022, Burrow spoke out on Instagram in favor of abortion rights in the United States.[135]

In January 2023, Burrow was among a coalition of about a dozen athletes, including Blake Griffin and Kevin Gausman, who purchased a 104-acre north Iowa farm with plans to further acquire a diverse set of agricultural assets.[136]

Notes

  1. ^ This record has since fallen to Bailey Zappe of Western Kentucky, who threw for 62 touchdowns in 2021.[51]

References

  1. ^ "2018 Spring Commencement program" (PDF). OSU.edu. The Ohio State University. p. 73. Archived (PDF) from the original on January 28, 2019. Retrieved December 22, 2019.
  2. ^ Peterson, Randy (December 13, 2019). "Peterson: Heisman Trophy front-runner Joe Burrow will be forever linked to Ames and that house on McKinley Drive". The Des Moines Register. Retrieved January 14, 2020.
  3. ^ "Joe Burrow". The Draft Network. Archived from the original on February 17, 2020. Retrieved January 16, 2020.
  4. ^ Clark, Dave (February 17, 2020). "Robin Burrow on Joe not wanting Bengals to draft him: 'No idea where that comes from'". The Cincinnati Enquirer. Archived from the original on August 5, 2020. Retrieved September 28, 2020.
  5. ^ Peterson, Randy (September 8, 2019). "Peterson's Big 12 picks: Ames roots run deep in NCAA football's biggest Week 2 game". The Des Moines Register. Retrieved October 1, 2019.
  6. ^ Guilbeau, Glenn (October 18, 2019). "LSU's Burrow returns to Mississippi, where his dad, uncle, grandparents were star athletes". The Daily Advertiser. Gannett. Retrieved January 11, 2023.
  7. ^ van Straten, Tim (October 12, 2019). "LSU QB Joe Burrow Was Asked About Nebraska On College GameDay". The Spun. Archived from the original on September 29, 2021. Retrieved September 29, 2021.
  8. ^ a b Dellenger, Ross (July 15, 2019). "Meet Joe Burrow: LSU's Toughest Renaissance Man and Maybe Savior at QB". Sports Illustrated. Archived from the original on July 22, 2019. Retrieved July 22, 2019.
  9. ^ Kolpack, Jeff (December 12, 2019). "Kolpack: Heisman Trophy favorite has roots with Bison football, Fargo Centennial Elementary School". The Forum of Fargo-Moorhead. Archived from the original on December 13, 2019. Retrieved December 13, 2019.
  10. ^ Hobson, Geoff (January 21, 2020). "Full Circle At Top Of The Draft?". bengals.com. Cincinnati Bengals. Archived from the original on August 2, 2021. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  11. ^ a b "Joe Burrow Bio". LSUSports.net. LSU Tigers Athletics. Archived from the original on September 25, 2019. Retrieved September 27, 2019.
  12. ^ Mickles, Sheldon (June 1, 2018). "Ultimate competitor: Joe Burrow's work ethic, storied high school career could bode well for LSU". The Advocate. Archived from the original on October 1, 2018. Retrieved September 4, 2019.
  13. ^ "Joe Burrow, Athens, Dual-Threat Quarterback". 247Sports. Archived from the original on November 11, 2020. Retrieved September 10, 2019.
  14. ^ Lesmerises, Doug (May 27, 2014). "Ohio State lands pledge from Joe Burrow, 3-star QB from Athens, Ohio: Buckeyes recruiting". cleveland.com. Archived from the original on December 28, 2019. Retrieved October 1, 2019.
  15. ^ "QB Joe Burrow commits to Ohio State". Akron Beacon Journal. Black Press. May 27, 2014. Archived from the original on December 28, 2019. Retrieved September 4, 2019.
  16. ^ "Joe Burrow Stadium: LSU QB's high school to name football stadium after him". The Advocate. December 19, 2019. Archived from the original on December 21, 2019. Retrieved January 1, 2020.
  17. ^ Suss, Nick (July 28, 2018). "LSU quarterback competition: The case for Joe Burrow". The Advocate. Archived from the original on October 1, 2018. Retrieved October 1, 2018.
  18. ^ a b c Bender, Bill (April 14, 2018). "Ohio State's Joe Burrow forces compelling QB decision for Urban Meyer, Buckeyes". Sporting News. Retrieved January 11, 2023.
  19. ^ Lesmerises, Doug (May 9, 2018). "How the Joe Burrow transfer changes Dwayne Haskins: Ohio State football analysis". cleveland.com. Archived from the original on October 3, 2018. Retrieved October 2, 2018.
  20. ^ Khan, Sam Jr. (May 19, 2018). "QB Joe Burrow transferring to LSU for final two seasons". ESPN. Archived from the original on October 1, 2018. Retrieved October 1, 2018.
  21. ^ a b "Ohio State transfer Joe Burrow is LSU's starting quarterback". Fox Sports. Associated Press. August 27, 2018. Archived from the original on October 1, 2018. Retrieved October 1, 2018.
  22. ^ Bonnette, Michael (September 17, 2018). "Burrow, Tracy Earn SEC Player of the Week Honors". LSUSports.net. LSU Athletics. Retrieved October 1, 2019.
  23. ^ Kubena, Brooks (October 2, 2018). "LSU quarterback Joe Burrow named SEC Offensive Player of the Week". The Advocate. Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Archived from the original on December 28, 2019. Retrieved October 1, 2019.
  24. ^ a b c Dellenger, Ross (July 15, 2019). "Meet Joe Burrow: LSU's Toughest Renaissance Man and Maybe Savior at QB". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved January 18, 2023.
  25. ^ "Joe Burrow 2018 Game Log". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Sports Reference. Retrieved November 15, 2022.
  26. ^ Dixon, Shea (September 4, 2019). "Joe Burrow grabs SEC Offensive Player of the Week". 247Sports.com. Retrieved October 1, 2019.
  27. ^ "Burrow, LSU Make History in Victory Over Texas". LSUSports.net. LSU Athletics. September 7, 2019. Retrieved October 1, 2019.
  28. ^ Carbone, Al (September 8, 2019). "LSU QB Joe Burrow and California LB Evan Weaver Named Walter Camp National FBS Players of the Week". Walter Camp Football Foundation. Archived from the original on November 7, 2020. Retrieved October 31, 2020.
  29. ^ "School-record 6 TDs for Burrow, No. 4 LSU routs Vandy 66-38". CBS Sports. Associated Press. September 21, 2019. Archived from the original on September 29, 2021. Retrieved September 29, 2021.
  30. ^ "Week 4: Football Players of the Week". SECSports.com. Southeastern Conference. September 23, 2019. Archived from the original on October 4, 2019. Retrieved October 1, 2019.
  31. ^ "Joe Burrow makes history as No. 5 LSU routs Utah State". ESPN.com. Associated Press. October 5, 2019. Archived from the original on December 7, 2019. Retrieved January 1, 2020.
  32. ^ "Joe Burrow's 3 TDs lift No. 5 LSU over No. 7 Florida 42–28". ESPN.com. Associated Press. October 12, 2019. Archived from the original on October 22, 2019. Retrieved January 1, 2020.
  33. ^ "Joe Burrow throws 4 TDs passes, No. 2 LSU routs MSU 36–13". ESPN.com. Associated Press. October 19, 2019. Archived from the original on June 20, 2020. Retrieved January 1, 2020.
  34. ^ "Burrow's 321 yards helps No. 2 LSU down No. 9 Auburn, 23–20". ESPN.com. Associated Press. October 26, 2019. Archived from the original on December 14, 2019. Retrieved January 1, 2020.
  35. ^ Pedersen, Brian (October 31, 2019). "Alabama vs. LSU: Game Preview, Prediction and Players to Watch". BleacherReport. Archived from the original on November 12, 2019. Retrieved October 19, 2020.
  36. ^ "Joe Burrow leads No. 2 LSU past No. 3 Alabama in 46–41 thriller". ESPN.com. Associated Press. November 9, 2019. Archived from the original on December 17, 2019. Retrieved January 1, 2020.
  37. ^ Kubena, Brooks (November 10, 2019). "LSU's Joe Burrow named Walter Camp National Offensive Player of the Week". The Advocate. Baton Rouge, LA. Archived from the original on November 12, 2019. Retrieved November 12, 2019.
  38. ^ "Burrow throws 5 TDs, No. 1 LSU beats Mississippi 58–37". ESPN.com. Associated Press. November 16, 2019. Archived from the original on November 17, 2019. Retrieved January 1, 2020.
  39. ^ "Burrow, No. 1 LSU dominate Texas A&M, 50–7". ESPN.com. Associated Press. November 30, 2019. Archived from the original on December 1, 2019. Retrieved January 1, 2020.
  40. ^ "Burrow completes Heisman coronation, LSU routs Georgia 37–10". ESPN.com. Associated Press. December 7, 2019. Archived from the original on December 8, 2019. Retrieved December 7, 2019.
  41. ^ Prescott, Adam (October 4, 2020). "Joe Burrow Notches First NFL Victory with Cincinnati Bengals". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved October 19, 2020.
  42. ^ Myerberg, Paul (December 14, 2019). "LSU quarterback Joe Burrow wins 2019 Heisman Trophy by record-setting margin". USA Today. Archived from the original on December 27, 2019. Retrieved January 1, 2020.
  43. ^ Paz, Harold (December 28, 2019). "Joe Burrow's Heisman speech is a call to action on food insecurity". CNN. Archived from the original on January 8, 2020. Retrieved January 12, 2020.
  44. ^ "Mannings' choice: Joe Burrow wins another award after historic season". WBRZ.com. January 29, 2020. Archived from the original on January 29, 2020. Retrieved January 29, 2020.
  45. ^ "Peach Bowl: Joe Burrow throws for seven touchdowns as No. 1 LSU routs No. 4 Oklahoma". Los Angeles Times. Associated Press. December 29, 2019. Archived from the original on December 31, 2019. Retrieved January 1, 2020.
  46. ^ Conover, Brayden (December 28, 2019). "Scoring summary of Chick-fil-A Peach Bowl between Oklahoma, LSU (live)". USA Today. Retrieved November 14, 2022.
  47. ^ Schlabach, Mark (December 28, 2019). "Joe Burrow's record 8 total TDs lead LSU in CFP semifinal win over Oklahoma". ESPN. Archived from the original on April 23, 2021. Retrieved October 19, 2020.
  48. ^ Sherman, Rodger (December 28, 2019). "Ranking Every Joe Burrow Touchdown From His Peach Bowl Masterpiece". The Ringer. Archived from the original on April 15, 2020. Retrieved October 21, 2020.
  49. ^ Kenyon, David (January 7, 2020). "Ranking the Greatest Individual Performances in College Football Playoff History". BleacherReport. Archived from the original on January 8, 2020. Retrieved October 19, 2020.
  50. ^ a b c d Kercheval, Ben (January 14, 2020). "LSU vs. Clemson: Every record Joe Burrow broke as all-time great season ends with national championship". CBS Sports. Archived from the original on January 15, 2020. Retrieved January 16, 2020.
  51. ^ a b "Zappe gets records, WKU rolls past App St 59-38 in Boca Bowl". ESPN.com. Associated Press. December 18, 2021. Archived from the original on December 18, 2021. Retrieved December 18, 2021.
  52. ^ "TD Responsible For Single Season Leaders and Records". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Archived from the original on December 18, 2021. Retrieved November 15, 2022.
  53. ^ "Passing Efficiency Rating Single Season Leaders and Records". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved December 24, 2022.
  54. ^ Wolken, Dan (January 15, 2020). "Opinion: LSU's Joe Burrow completes greatest single season by college QB with national title". USA Today. Archived from the original on January 16, 2020. Retrieved January 16, 2020.
  55. ^ "LSU captures the national championship as Joe Burrow caps the greatest season ever". Fox Sports. January 14, 2020. Archived from the original on January 16, 2020. Retrieved January 16, 2020.
  56. ^ Kramer, Adam (January 14, 2020). "Joe Burrow Caps Greatest Individual Season in CFB History with Title Win". Bleacher Report. Archived from the original on January 16, 2020. Retrieved January 16, 2020.
  57. ^ Thamel, Pete (January 14, 2020). "How Joe Burrow authored the best season in college football history". Yahoo! Sports. Archived from the original on January 16, 2020. Retrieved January 16, 2020.
  58. ^ Kerr, Jeff (April 17, 2020). "2020 NFL Draft: Wonderlic test scores revealed, Tua Tagovailoa ranks lowest among quarterbacks, per report". CBS Sports. Archived from the original on October 28, 2021. Retrieved October 28, 2021.
  59. ^ a b "Joe Burrow Draft and Combine Prospect Profile". National Football League. Archived from the original on March 8, 2021. Retrieved April 23, 2020.
  60. ^ "58 prospects to virtually participate in NFL draft". National Football League. April 9, 2020. Archived from the original on April 10, 2020. Retrieved April 10, 2020.
  61. ^ Baby, Ben (April 23, 2020). "Cincinnati Bengals take Joe Burrow with No. 1 pick in NFL draft". ESPN. Archived from the original on April 24, 2020. Retrieved April 24, 2020.
  62. ^ Straka, Dean (April 23, 2020). "Joe Burrow drafted No. 1 overall by Bengals in 2020 NFL Draft". 247Sports.com. Retrieved May 12, 2020.
  63. ^ "Bengals Sign Quarterback Joe Burrow". Bengals.com. July 31, 2020. Archived from the original on August 1, 2020. Retrieved July 31, 2020.
  64. ^ Canova, Daniel (April 28, 2020). "Joe Burrow, Tua Tagovailoa are favorites to win NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year". Fox News. Archived from the original on July 12, 2020. Retrieved July 12, 2020.
  65. ^ Zierlein, Lance (July 8, 2020). "NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year candidates: Joe Burrow leads field". National Football League. Archived from the original on July 11, 2020. Retrieved July 12, 2020.
  66. ^ Edholm, Eric (August 26, 2020). "The top 10 offensive rookies for the 2020 NFL season". Yahoo Sports. Archived from the original on August 31, 2020. Retrieved September 1, 2020.
  67. ^ Thompson, Jaylon (September 7, 2020). "Joe Burrow details approach prior to first NFL start". 247Sports. Retrieved September 9, 2020.
  68. ^ DeArdo, Bryan (September 13, 2020). "Bengals vs. Chargers final score: Turnovers, missed field goal spoil Joe Burrow's NFL debut". CBS Sports. Archived from the original on September 14, 2020. Retrieved September 14, 2020.
  69. ^ "Cincinnati Bengals at Cleveland Browns – September 17th, 2020". Pro Football Reference. Archived from the original on October 1, 2020. Retrieved September 18, 2020.
  70. ^ Zembrodt, Nicole (September 18, 2020). "Bengals QB Joe Burrow breaks rookie record in 35–30 loss to Browns". Sports Illustrated. Archived from the original on September 20, 2020. Retrieved September 18, 2020.
  71. ^ Embody, Billy (October 4, 2020). "Joe Burrow makes NFL history in first win with Bengals". 247 Sports. Retrieved October 5, 2020.
  72. ^ "Cleveland Browns at Cincinnati Bengals – October 25th, 2020". Pro Football Reference. Archived from the original on October 30, 2020. Retrieved October 29, 2020.
  73. ^ Hunte, Sydney (October 25, 2020). "Bengals QB Joe Burrow sets NFL rookie record during narrow defeat to the Browns". Saturday Down South. Archived from the original on November 3, 2020. Retrieved October 29, 2020.
  74. ^ Florio, Mike (November 2, 2020). "Joe Burrow sets a midseason mark for rookie completions". ProFootballTalk. Archived from the original on November 2, 2020. Retrieved December 1, 2020.
  75. ^ Schefter, Adam; Baby, Ben (November 23, 2020). "Torn ACL, MCL, plus more knee damage for Cincinnati Bengals QB Joe Burrow, sources say". ESPN. Archived from the original on November 23, 2020. Retrieved November 23, 2020.
  76. ^ Rapien, James (November 24, 2020). "Bengals 'Encouraged' By MRI of Joe Burrow's Knee". Sports Illustrated. Archived from the original on November 24, 2020. Retrieved November 24, 2020.
  77. ^ Rapien, James (November 23, 2020). "Bengals place Joe Burrow on injured reserve". Sports Illustrated. Archived from the original on November 23, 2020. Retrieved November 24, 2020.
  78. ^ a b Rapien, James (December 11, 2020). "Joe Burrow is Still Preparing and Watching Film". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved January 18, 2023.
  79. ^ Koshover, Will (September 7, 2021). "Cincinnati Bengals Quarterback Joe Burrow Is Ready for Week 1 -". Last Word on Pro Football. Retrieved January 17, 2022.
  80. ^ Gordon, Grant (October 6, 2021). "Bengals QB Joe Burrow, Giants QB Daniel Jones lead Players of the Week". NFL.com. Archived from the original on October 18, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  81. ^ Hobson, Geoff (December 26, 2021). "Santa Burrow Delivers With Club-Record 525 Yards As Bengals On Verge of AFC North Title". www.bengals.com. Archived from the original on December 26, 2021. Retrieved December 26, 2021.
  82. ^ "Bengals QB Joe Burrow Named AFC Offensive Player of the Week for Week 16". www.bengals.com. December 29, 2021. Archived from the original on January 3, 2022. Retrieved January 3, 2022.
  83. ^ Barron, Tory (January 3, 2022). "Cigar smokin' Joe Burrow is back again as Cincinnati Bengals win AFC North". ESPN.com. Archived from the original on January 3, 2022. Retrieved January 3, 2022.
  84. ^ Rapien, James (January 2, 2022). "Joe Burrow Breaks Two Bengals' Single-Season Records". Si.com. Archived from the original on January 10, 2022. Retrieved January 10, 2022.
  85. ^ "NFL Leaders, Football Records, NFL Leaderboards". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Archived from the original on January 8, 2022. Retrieved January 10, 2022.
  86. ^ Polacek, Scott (January 16, 2022). "Joe Burrow, Bengals Snap NFL Playoff Drought with Win Over Derek Carr, Raiders". Bleacher Report. Retrieved January 16, 2022.
  87. ^ Salvador, Joseph (January 22, 2022). "Bengals Knock Off Top-Seeded Titans on Last-Second Field Goal for First Road Playoff Win". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved January 24, 2022.
  88. ^ Kerr, Jeff (January 22, 2022). "Joe Burrow ties NFL record for most times sacked in playoff game, and rewrites history book with Bengals win". CBSSports.com. Retrieved January 23, 2022.
  89. ^ "Bengals roar back from 18 points down to stun Chiefs and reach Super Bowl". The Guardian. Associated Press. January 30, 2022. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  90. ^ Zucker, Joseph (January 30, 2022). "Joe Burrow, Bengals Stun Patrick Mahomes, Chiefs in OT, Advance to 2022 Super Bowl". Bleacher Report. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  91. ^ Jackson, Andrew (February 14, 2022). "Rams win Super Bowl epic as 'insane' record-breaking low exposes superstar QB". Fox Sports. Retrieved February 14, 2022.
  92. ^ "Most times offensively sacked in a single postseason". StatMuse. Retrieved February 14, 2022.
  93. ^ Baby, Ben (September 11, 2022). "Joe Burrow's 5 turnovers, missed kicks by Evan McPherson stymie Cincinnati Bengals in first game since Super Bowl LVI". ESPN.com. Retrieved September 12, 2022.
  94. ^ Podell, Garrett (October 23, 2022). "Falcons vs. Bengals score, takeaways: Joe Burrow explodes for 481 yards, puts away Atlanta early". CBSSports.com. Retrieved October 24, 2022.
  95. ^ Holzman-Escareno, Anthony (October 24, 2022). "NFL stats and records, Week 7: Chiefs QB Patrick Mahomes puts himself among HOFers with performance vs. 49ers". NFL.com. Retrieved November 14, 2022.
  96. ^ Gordon, Grant (October 26, 2022). "Bengals QB Joe Burrow, Giants QB Daniel Jones among Players of the Week". NFL.com. Retrieved October 26, 2022.
  97. ^ Gordon, Grant (December 7, 2022). "Bengals QB Joe Burrow, Eagles QB Jalen Hurts lead Players of the Week". NFL.com.
  98. ^ Gillis, Andrew (December 22, 2022). "Bengals QB Joe Burrow, WR Ja'Marr Chase, DE Trey Hendrickson, voted to 2023 Pro Bowl team". cleveland. Retrieved December 24, 2022.
  99. ^ Gordon, Grant (December 28, 2022). "Bengals QB Joe Burrow, Panthers RB D'Onta Foreman lead Players of the Week". NFL.com.
  100. ^ Rapien, James (January 5, 2023). "It's Official: Bengals Win Back-to-Back AFC North Championships For First Time in Team History". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved January 11, 2023.
  101. ^ "2022 NFL Leaders and Leaderboards". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved January 11, 2023.
  102. ^ Rapien, James (January 10, 2023). "AFC Player Praises Joe Burrow's Ability to Deliver in Big Moments: 'He's At the Very Top'". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved January 11, 2023.
  103. ^ Zembrodt, Nicole (January 9, 2023). "Joe Burrow and Bengals Carrying Regular Season Momentum Into Playoffs: 'Still A Lot of Room To Improve'". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved January 11, 2023.
  104. ^ Sam, Doric (January 15, 2023). "Joe Burrow, Bengals Offense Criticized for Failing to Put Ravens Away in Tight Win". Bleacher Report. Retrieved January 19, 2023.
  105. ^ Wetzel, Dan (January 22, 2023). "'Better send those refunds' — Joe Burrow's grip on AFC remains firm and he's not ready to bow to Josh Allen or Patrick Mahomes". Yahoo! Sports. Retrieved January 22, 2023.
  106. ^ Simmons, Myles (January 30, 2023). "Joe Burrow: This one hurts, but we will come back stronger". ProFootballTalk. NBC Sports. Retrieved January 30, 2023.
  107. ^ a b c d e Mays, Robert (November 8, 2019). "The Modern NFL Has Never Seen a Draft Prospect Rise Like Joe Burrow". The Ringer. Retrieved January 18, 2023.
  108. ^ a b c d e Santagata, Mike (December 29, 2021). "Film Breakdown: Analyzing Joe Burrow's Three Elite Traits". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved January 18, 2023.
  109. ^ a b c d e Dellenger, Ross (November 26, 2019). "Joe Burrow's Remarkable Rise Has Been Beyond Even His Wildest Dreams". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved January 18, 2023.
  110. ^ a b c d Goldsmith, Charlie (December 30, 2021). "'It's remarkable': Joe Burrow has become one of the most exciting quarterbacks in the NFL". The Cincinnati Enquirer. Archived from the original on December 30, 2021. Retrieved January 18, 2023.
  111. ^ a b Baby, Ben (January 19, 2022). "Why Bengals QB Joe Burrow has kept a chessboard by his locker this season". ESPN. Retrieved July 5, 2022.
  112. ^ Linville, Ray (February 22, 2022). "Why Super Bowl Quarterback Joe Burrow Plays Chess". Chess.com. Retrieved July 5, 2022.
  113. ^ Dehner Jr., Paul (October 20, 2022). "Defining Joe Burrow's magic: How his third-down playmaking powers the Bengals". The Athletic. Retrieved January 18, 2023.
  114. ^ a b c Roling, Chris (December 31, 2021). "Joe Burrow is a 'young Tom Brady' in the eyes of one Chiefs coach". Bengals Wire. USA Today. Retrieved January 18, 2023.
  115. ^ Rapien, James (December 9, 2020). "Mike Daniels Praises Joe Burrow's Leadership: 'Bengals Got the Right One'". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved January 18, 2023.
  116. ^ Eck, Kevin (May 19, 2022). "Late for Work 5/19: Joe Burrow: 'I Love Playing the Ravens Because They Talk'". baltimoreravens.com. Baltimore Ravens. Retrieved January 18, 2023.
  117. ^ Busbee, Jay (October 17, 2022). "Backing up the swag: Joe Burrow shows out, steps up". Yahoo! Sports. Retrieved January 18, 2023.
  118. ^ Young, Shalise Manza (February 8, 2022). "Joe Cooler: How Burrow gets people to buy in like Brady with a crossover appeal he could never match". Yahoo! Sports. Retrieved January 18, 2023.
  119. ^ King, Peter (October 25, 2021). "FMIA Week 7: Road Wins At Ravens, Steelers? Joe Burrow's Bengals Are Scary, And It's Not Even Halloween". ProFootballTalk. NBC Sports. Retrieved January 10, 2023.
  120. ^ Heifitz, Danny (February 11, 2022). "Stand and Deliver: How Joe Burrow and Matthew Stafford Survive—and Thrive—Under Pressure". The Ringer. Retrieved January 18, 2023.
  121. ^ Connolly, Oliver (January 31, 2022). "Unflappable. Unwavering. Unbelievable. Burrow is the NFL's new Joe Cool". The Guardian. Retrieved January 18, 2023.
  122. ^ Ogwude, Haadiza (January 21, 2023). "Where was Joe Burrow born? 7 facts about the star Bengals quarterback". Cincinnati Enquirer. Archived from the original on January 21, 2023. Retrieved January 23, 2023.
  123. ^ Marcum, Jason (January 8, 2023). "Burrow breaks completion percentage record". Cincy Jungle. Retrieved January 8, 2023.
  124. ^ "NFL Pass Completion % Career Playoffs Leaders". Pro Football Reference. Retrieved January 16, 2023.
  125. ^ "Most passes completed by a rookie in a game". StatMuse. Retrieved February 15, 2022.
  126. ^ Baby, Ben (December 26, 2021). "Cincinnati QB Joe Burrow's 525 passing yards shatters team record, gives Bengals blowout win over Baltimore Ravens". ESPN.com. Archived from the original on December 27, 2021. Retrieved December 28, 2021.
  127. ^ a b c d e f "Cincinnati Bengals Career Passing Leaders". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Archived from the original on December 26, 2021. Retrieved December 28, 2021.
  128. ^ "Most 300-yard passing games in a single season, Cincinnati Bengals". StatMuse. Retrieved November 15, 2022.
  129. ^ Smith, Michael David (August 1, 2020). "Joe Burrow: I'll live off my endorsements and save all my NFL paychecks". Pro Football Talk. NBC Sports. Archived from the original on October 6, 2020. Retrieved August 1, 2020.
  130. ^ Heltman, Russ. "Joe Burrow Reveals His Love For Playing Super Smash Bros. On Road Game Flights". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved January 28, 2023.
  131. ^ Taranto, Steven. "Joe Burrow reveals the Bengals play 'Super Smash Bros.' during road game flights". CBS Sports. Retrieved January 28, 2023.
  132. ^ Clark, Dave (January 31, 2022). "Joe Burrow: Football part isn't surreal, but praise from Kid Cudi, LeBron James is". Cincinnati.com. Retrieved February 1, 2022.
  133. ^ Salvador, Joseph (February 15, 2022). "Joe Burrow Goes on Stage With Kid Cudi After Super Bowl Loss". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved January 11, 2023.
  134. ^ Heltman, Russ (September 26, 2022). "Look: Rapper Kid Cudi Names Song After Joe Burrow". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved September 28, 2022.
  135. ^ Moorwood, Victoria (June 27, 2022). "Joe Burrow shares abortion-rights Instagram post after Roe v. Wade overturned". USA TODAY. Archived from the original on June 28, 2022. Retrieved September 17, 2022.
  136. ^ Eller, Donnelle (January 10, 2023). "Joe Burrow, other pro athletes take a stake in Iowa with farm purchase". The Des Moines Register. Gannett. Retrieved January 11, 2023.