The Washington Huskies college football team competes as part of the NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS), representing the University of Washington in the North Division of the Pac-12 Conference (Pac-12). Since the establishment of the team in 1889, Washington has appeared in 38 bowl games.[1] Included in these games are 14 appearances in the Rose Bowl Game, one in the Orange Bowl and one Bowl Championship Series (BCS) game appearance.[1][2] Through the history of the program, nine separate coaches have led the Huskies to bowl games with Don James having the most appearances with 14. With a loss in their most recent bowl game, the 2017 Fiesta Bowl, Washington's overall bowl record stands at 18 wins, 19 losses and 1 tie (18–19–1).[1] The Pac-8 did not allow a second bowl team from the conference until 1975.[3]

Key

Bowl games

List of bowl games showing bowl played in, score, date, season, opponent, stadium, location, attendance and head coach[A 1]
# Bowl Score Date Season Opponent Stadium Location Attendance Head coach
1 Rose Bowl T 14–14 January 1, 1924 1923 Navy Midshipmen Rose Bowl Pasadena 40,000 Enoch Bagshaw
2 Rose Bowl L 19–20 January 1, 1926 1925 Alabama Crimson Tide Rose Bowl Pasadena 50,000 Enoch Bagshaw
3 Rose Bowl L 0–21 January 1, 1937 1936 Pittsburgh Panthers Rose Bowl Pasadena 87,196double-dagger James Phelan
4 Poi Bowl W 53–13 January 1, 1938 1937 Hawaii Honolulu Stadium Honolulu 13,500 James Phelan
5 Rose Bowl L 0–29 January 1, 1944 1943 USC Trojans Rose Bowl Pasadena 68,000 Ralph Welch
6 Rose Bowl W 44–8 January 1, 1960 1959 Wisconsin Badgers Rose Bowl Pasadena 100,809 Jim Owens
7 Rose Bowl W 17–7 January 2, 1961 1960 Minnesota Golden Gophers Rose Bowl Pasadena 97,314 Jim Owens
8 Rose Bowl L 7–17 January 1, 1964 1963 Illinois Fighting Illini Rose Bowl Pasadena 96,957 Jim Owens
9 Rose Bowl W 27–20 January 2, 1978 1977 Michigan Wolverines Rose Bowl Pasadena 105,312 Don James
10 Sun Bowl W 14–7 December 22, 1979 1979 Texas Longhorns Sun Bowl El Paso 33,412 Don James
11 Rose Bowl L 6–23 January 1, 1981 1980 Michigan Wolverines Rose Bowl Pasadena 105,526 Don James
12 Rose Bowl W 28–0 January 1, 1982 1981 Iowa Hawkeyes Rose Bowl Pasadena 105,611 Don James
13 Aloha Bowl W 21–20 December 25, 1982 1982 Maryland Terrapins Aloha Stadium Honolulu 30,055double-dagger Don James
14 Aloha Bowl L 10–13 December 26, 1983 1983 Penn State Nittany Lions Aloha Stadium Honolulu 37,212double-dagger Don James
15 Orange Bowl W 28–17 January 1, 1985 1984 Oklahoma Sooners Orange Bowl Miami 56,294 Don James
16 Freedom Bowl W 20–17 December 30, 1985 1985 Colorado Buffaloes Anaheim Stadium Anaheim 30,961double-dagger Don James
17 Sun Bowl L 6–28 December 25, 1986 1986 Alabama Crimson Tide Sun Bowl El Paso 48,722 Don James
18 Independence Bowl W 24–12 December 19, 1987 1987 Tulane Green Wave Independence Stadium Shreveport 41,683 Don James
19 Freedom Bowl W 34–7 December 30, 1989 1989 Florida Gators Anaheim Stadium Anaheim 33,858 Don James
20 Rose Bowl W 46–34 January 1, 1991 1990 Iowa Hawkeyes Rose Bowl Pasadena 101,273 Don James
21 Rose Bowl W 34–14 January 1, 1992 1991 Michigan Wolverines Rose Bowl Pasadena 103,566 Don James
22 Rose Bowl L 31–38 January 1, 1993 1992 Michigan Wolverines Rose Bowl Pasadena 94,236 Don James
23 Sun Bowl L 18–38 December 29, 1995 1995 Iowa Hawkeyes Sun Bowl El Paso 49,116 Jim Lambright
24 Holiday Bowl L 21–33 December 30, 1996 1996 Colorado Buffaloes Jack Murphy Stadium[A 2] San Diego 54,749 Jim Lambright
25 Aloha Bowl W 51–23 December 25, 1997 1997 Michigan State Spartans Aloha Stadium Honolulu 44,598 Jim Lambright
26 Oahu Bowl L 25–45 December 25, 1998 1998 Air Force Falcons Aloha Stadium Honolulu 46,451dagger Jim Lambright
27 Holiday Bowl L 20–24 December 29, 1999 1999 Kansas State Wildcats Qualcomm Stadium[A 2] San Diego 57,118 Rick Neuheisel
28 Rose Bowl W 34–24 January 1, 2001 2000 Purdue Boilermakers Rose Bowl Pasadena 94,392 Rick Neuheisel
29 Holiday Bowl L 43–47 December 28, 2001 2001 Texas Longhorns Qualcomm Stadium[A 2] San Diego 60,548 Rick Neuheisel
30 Sun Bowl L 24–34 December 30, 2002 2002 Purdue Boilermakers Sun Bowl El Paso 48,917 Rick Neuheisel
31 Holiday Bowl W 19–7 December 30, 2010 2010 Nebraska Cornhuskers Qualcomm Stadium[A 2] San Diego 57,291 Steve Sarkisian
32 Alamo Bowl L 56–67 December 29, 2011 2011 Baylor Bears Alamodome San Antonio 65,256 Steve Sarkisian
33 Maaco Bowl Las Vegas L 26–28 December 22, 2012 2012 Boise State Broncos Sam Boyd Stadium Las Vegas 33,217 Steve Sarkisian
34 Fight Hunger Bowl W 31–16 December 27, 2013 2013 BYU Cougars AT&T Park San Francisco 34,136 Marques Tuiasosopo (Interim)
35 Cactus Bowl L 22–30 January 2, 2015 2014 Oklahoma State Cowboys Sun Devil Stadium Tempe 35,409 Chris Petersen
36 Heart of Dallas Bowl W 44–31 December 26, 2015 2015 Southern Miss Golden Eagles Cotton Bowl Dallas 20,229[5] Chris Petersen
37 Peach Bowl L 7–24 December 31, 2016 2016 Alabama Crimson Tide Georgia Dome Atlanta 75,996 Chris Petersen
38 Fiesta Bowl L 28–35 December 30, 2017 2017 Penn State Nittany Lions University of Phoenix Stadium Glendale 61,842 Chris Petersen
39 Rose Bowl L 23–28 January 1, 2019 2018 Ohio State Buckeyes Rose Bowl Pasadena 91,853 Chris Petersen
40 Las Vegas Bowl W 38–7 December 21, 2019 2019 Boise State Broncos Sam Boyd Stadium Whitney 34,197 Chris Petersen

Notes

  1. ^ Statistics correct as of 2010–11 NCAA football bowl games.
  2. ^ a b c d Originally called Jack Murphy Stadium from 1980 to 1997, in 1998 it was renamed Qualcomm Stadium.[4]

References

General
Specific
  1. ^ a b c Bowl/All-Star Game Records, p. 29
  2. ^ Bowl/All-Star Game Records, p. 31
  3. ^ Eugene Register-Guard – Bowling 'em over – 1975-12-05 – p.1B
  4. ^ Bowl/All-Star Game Records, p. 8
  5. ^ "2015 Heart of Dallas Bowl: Washington vs. Southern Miss". Stat Broadcast. Retrieved 2015-12-26.