The ceremonial county of Buckinghamshire, which includes the unitary authorities of Buckinghamshire and the City of Milton Keynes, is divided into 7 parliamentary constituencies – 1 borough constituency and 6 county constituencies.

Constituencies

Further information: 2019 United Kingdom general election

  Conservative   Labour   Liberal Democrat ¤   Independent

Constituency[nb 1] Electorate[1] Majority[2][nb 2] Member of Parliament[2] Nearest opposition[2] Map
Aylesbury CC 86,665 17,373   Rob Butler   Liz Hind ‡
A medium constituency stretching from the centre to the southwest of the county.
Beaconsfield CC 77,720 15,712   Joy Morrissey   Dominic Grieve
A medium constituency, located in the far south of the county.
Buckingham CC 83,146 20,411   Greg Smith   Stephen Dorrell ¤
A large constituency, stretching from the centre to the north of the county.
Chesham and Amersham CC 72,542 8,028   Sarah Green ¤   Peter Fleet †
A medium constituency in the southest of the county.
Milton Keynes North CC 91,545 6,255   Ben Everitt   Charlynne Pullen ‡
A medium constituency, to the far north of the county.
Milton Keynes South BC 96,363 6,944   Iain Stewart   Hannah O'Neill ‡
A medium constituency in the north of the county.
Wycombe CC 78,093 4,214   Steve Baker   Khalil Ahmed ‡
A small-to-medium-sized constituency, situated in the southwest of the county.

2010 boundary changes

Under the Fifth Periodic Review of Westminster constituencies, the Boundary Commission for England[3] decided to retain Buckinghamshire's constituencies for the 2010 election, making minor changes to realign constituency boundaries with the boundaries of current local government wards, and to reduce the electoral disparity between constituencies. The changes included the return of Great Missenden to Chesham and Amersham, Hazlemere to Wycombe and Aston Clinton to Buckingham. In addition, Marlow was transferred from Wycombe to Beaconsfield and Princes Risborough from Aylesbury to Buckingham. The boundary between the two Milton Keynes constituencies was realigned and they were renamed as Milton Keynes North and Milton Keynes South.

Former name Boundaries 1997-2010 Current name Boundaries 2010–present
  1. Aylesbury CC
  2. Beaconsfield CC
  3. Buckingham CC
  4. Chesham and Amersham CC
  5. Milton Keynes South West BC
  6. Milton Keynes North East CC
  7. Wycombe CC
Parliamentary constituencies in Buckinghamshire
  1. Aylesbury CC
  2. Beaconsfield CC
  3. Buckingham CC
  4. Chesham and Amersham CC
  5. Milton Keynes North CC
  6. Milton Keynes South BC
  7. Wycombe CC
Proposed Revised constituencies in Buckinghamshire

Proposed boundary changes

See 2023 Periodic Review of Westminster constituencies for further details.

Following the abandonment of the Sixth Periodic Review (the 2018 review), the Boundary Commission for England formally launched the 2023 Review on 5 January 2021 and published their initial proposals on 8 June 2021.[4]

The commission has proposed that an additional seat is created in the combined area of Buckinghamshire and Milton Keynes, with boundary changes to reflect the ward boundaries of the newly formed unitary authority of Buckinghamshire. This results in major changes, with Buckingham and the two Milton Keynes seats (North and South) abolished and four new seats created - Buckingham and Bletchley, Milton Keynes, Newport Pagnell, and Princes Risborough. Beaconsfield would become Marlow and South Buckinghamshire, and Wycombe renamed High Wycombe.[5][6]

The following constituencies are proposed:

Containing electoral wards from Buckinghamshire (unitary authority)

Containing electoral wards from Milton Keynes

Revised proposals will be published in late 2022 and the final report will be submitted in June 2023.

Results history

Primary data source: House of Commons research briefing - General election results from 1918 to 2019[7]

2019

The number of votes cast for each political party who fielded candidates in constituencies comprising Buckinghamshire in the 2019 general election were as follows:

Party Votes % Change from 2017 Seats Change from 2017
Conservative 220,814 52.7% Increase5.7% 7 Increase1
Labour 106,226 25.4% Decrease3.9% 0 0
Liberal Democrats 57,554 13.7% Increase7.3% 0 0
Greens 12,349 2.9% Decrease1.1% 0 0
Brexit 1,286 0.3% new 0 0
Others 20,664 5.0% Decrease8.3% 0 Decrease1
Total 418,893 100.0 7

Percentage votes

Note that before 1983 Buckinghamshire included the Eton and Slough areas of what is now Berkshire.

Election year 1922 1923 1924 1929 1931 1935 1945 1950 1951 1955 1959 1964 1966 1970 1974 (F) 1974 (O) 1979 1983 1987 1992 1997 2001 2005 2010 2015 2017 2019
Conservative 50.2 47.0 54.3 47.1 72.3 60.6 43.4 45.2 54.3 53.9 52.5 48.8 47.1 52.5 44.3 44.4 55.0 56.8 57.0 57.0 43.7 45.1 47.8 44.3 45.5 47.0 52.7
Labour 13.8 19.6 16.3 19.7 20.9 29.1 43.8 39.7 45.7 40.4 35.4 36.0 39.7 35.9 29.7 32.0 27.4 14.4 15.5 19.2 30.6 30.9 25.9 15.5 18.1 29.3 25.4
Liberal Democrat1 36.1 33.4 29.4 33.1 6.8 10.3 12.7 14.7 - 5.7 12.1 15.2 13.2 11.7 25.4 22.5 15.9 28.5 27.0 22.1 21.2 19.9 21.2 20.9 6.5 6.4 13.7
Green Party - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * * * * * 0.8 5.7 4.0 2.9
UKIP - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * * * 6.2 14.9 3.2 *
Brexit Party - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 0.3
The Speaker2 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 6.3 9.0 8.5 -
Other - - - - - - - 0.4 - - - - - - 0.6 1.1 1.7 0.4 0.5 1.8 4.5 4.0 5.0 5.9 0.3 1.6 5.0

1pre-1979: Liberal Party; 1983 & 1987 - SDP-Liberal Alliance

2Standing in Buckingham, unopposed by the 3 main parties.

* Included in Other

Accurate vote percentages for the 1918 election cannot be obtained because some candidates stood unopposed.

Seats

Election year 1983 1987 1992 1997 2001 2005 2010 2015 2017 2019
Conservative 6 6 7 5 5 6 6 6 6 7
Labour 0 0 0 2 2 1 0 0 0 0
The Speaker1 - - - - - - 1 1 1 -
Total 6 6 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7

1John Bercow

Maps

Historical representation by party

A cell marked → (with a different colour background to the preceding cell) indicates that the previous MP continued to sit under a new party name.

1885 to 1945

  Conservative   Liberal   Liberal Unionist

Constituency 1885 1886 89 91 1892 1895 99 1900 1906 Jan 10 Dec 10 12 14 1918 1922 1923 1924 1929 1931 1935 37 38 43
Aylesbury F. de Rothschild W. de Rothschild L. de Rothschild Keens Burgoyne Beaumont Reed
Buckingham E. Verney Hubbard E. Verney Leon Carlile F. Verney H. Verney Bowyer Whiteley Berry
Wycombe Curzon Grenfell Herbert Cripps du Pré Woodhouse Knox

1945 to 1983

  Conservative   Labour

Constituency 1945 1950 1951 52 1955 1959 1964 1966 1970 Feb 1974 Oct 1974 78 1979 82
Eton and Slough Levy Brockway Meyer Lestor
Aylesbury Reed Summers Raison
Buckingham Crawley Markham Maxwell Benyon
Wycombe Haire Astor Hall Whitney
Buckinghamshire South / Beaconsfield (1974) Bell Smith
Chesham and Amersham Gilmour

1983 to present

  Conservative   Independent   Labour   Speaker   Liberal Democrats

Constituency 1983 1987 1992 1997 2001 2005 09 2010 2015 2017 19 2019 21
Aylesbury Raison Lidington Butler
Buckingham Walden Bercow G. Smith
Wycombe Whitney Goodman Baker
Beaconsfield T. Smith Grieve Morrissey
Chesham and Amersham Gilmour Gillan Green
Milton Keynes / NE Milton Keynes (1992) / MK North (2010) Benyon Butler White Lancaster Everitt
Milton Keynes SW / Milton Keynes S (2010) Legg Starkey Stewart

See also

Notes

  1. ^ BC denotes borough constituency, CC denotes county constituency.
  2. ^ The majority is the number of votes the winning candidate receives more than their nearest rival.

References

  1. ^ Baker, Carl; Uberoi, Elise; Cracknell, Richard (28 January 2020). "General Election 2019: full results and analysis". ((cite journal)): Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  2. ^ a b c "Constituencies A-Z - Election 2019". BBC News. Retrieved 24 April 2020.
  3. ^ "The Parliamentary Constituencies (England) Order 2007". legislation.gov.uk. Retrieved 27 May 2020.
  4. ^ "2023 Review | Boundary Commission for England". boundarycommissionforengland.independent.gov.uk. Retrieved 7 October 2021.
  5. ^ "How 'strange' boundary changes affects Bucks' constituencies". www.bucksherald.co.uk. Retrieved 18 October 2021.
  6. ^ "Initial proposals for new Parliamentary constituency boundaries in the South East region | Boundary Commission for England". boundarycommissionforengland.independent.gov.uk. Retrieved 18 October 2021.
  7. ^ Watson, Christopher; Uberoi, Elise; Loft, Philip (17 April 2020). "General election results from 1918 to 2019". ((cite journal)): Cite journal requires |journal= (help)