Luo Yigang
罗毅刚
Personal information
CountryChina
Born (1975-03-22) March 22, 1975 (age 48)
Hunan, China
Height180 cm (5 ft 11 in)
HandednessRight
Men's singles
Highest ranking3 (in 1998)
Medal record
Representing  China
Men's badminton
Thomas Cup
Silver medal – second place 2000 Kuala Lumpur Men's team
Bronze medal – third place 1998 Hong Kong Men's team
Asian Games
Silver medal – second place 1998 Bangkok Men's team
Asian Championships
Silver medal – second place 1996 Surabaya Men's singles
Bronze medal – third place 1998 Bangkok Men's singles
Asian Cup
Silver medal – second place 1996 Seoul Men's singles
BWF profile

Luo Yigang (Chinese: 罗毅刚; pinyin: Luō Yìgāng; born 22 March 1975) is a retired Chinese badminton player and currently serving as national badminton coach of Chinese team.[1][2]

Career

Luo Yigang is a former star in China's men's singles. He has a high savvy, comprehensive technique and steady style of play. He can often give full play to his level in the game. After starting badminton at the age of 9, Yigang entered the Hunan team when he turned 13. Luo made China's B team at the beginning of 1996, and the A team a few months later. In 96, he won the silver medal in the Asian Championships, losing the final to Indonesia's Jeffer Rosobin. He qualified for 1997 World Badminton Grand Prix Finals. 1998 was his best year as he won the Swedish Open and was a semi-finalist at the All England. Besides this he won another medal at the Asian Championships and again qualified for year-end Grand Prix Finals. In 1999, he won the Malaysian Open and finished as semifinalist spot in Korean Open. In 2001, he won National Championships by beating Lin Dan in the final. His last match was played in Paris, where he won the 2002 French Open, then an International Challenge tournament where afterwards he retired from National team. His best achievement in a team event was a silver medal in the 1998 Asian Games in Bangkok and a silver at 2000 Thomas Cup.[3]

After leaving the national team, Luo Yigang spent more than half a year in the Hunan provincial team. In 2003, after obtaining the permission of the Hunan provincial team and the national team, he chose to go to Denmark to develop and teach in a badminton club in Copenhagen. He also represented Club competition there. In 2005, he returned to Hunan provincial team to start coaching the players. By 2007, he was selected as a coach in National Youth training team. In 2018, he replaced Zhang Ning as National Women's singles team coach after a poor showing in Uber Cup. He is currently coaching Chinese Women's singles players.[4]

Achievements

Asian Championships

Men's singles

Year Venue Opponent Score Result
1998 Bangkok, Thailand China Chen Gang 5–15, 8–15 Bronze Bronze
1996 Surabaya, Indonesia Indonesia Jeffer Rosobin 15–9, 7–15, 5–15 Silver Silver

Asian Cup

Men's singles

Year Venue Opponent Score Result
1996 Olympic Gymnasium No. 2, Seoul, South Korea Malaysia Rashid Sidek 14–18, 5–15 Silver Silver

IBF World Grand Prix

The World Badminton Grand Prix sanctioned by International Badminton Federation (IBF) from 1983 to 2006.

Men's singles

Year Tournament Opponent Score Result
1999 Malaysia Open Malaysia Wong Choong Hann 17–16, 17–15 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner
1998 Swedish Open China Chen Gang 18–14, 15–2 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner
1998 Japan Open Denmark Peter Gade 3–15, 11–15 2nd place, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
1997 China Open China Dong Jiong 10–15, 2–15 2nd place, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
1996 China Open Chinese Taipei Fung Permadi 12–15, 9–15 2nd place, silver medalist(s) Runner-up

IBF International

Men's singles

Year Tournament Opponent Score Result
2002 French International China Wu Yunyong 7–5, 8–7, 7–4 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner

References

  1. ^ "Profile:LUO Yigang". bwfbadminton.com. Retrieved 23 November 2020.
  2. ^ Huaxia, ed. (21 June 2020). "China eyeing badminton women's singles gold at Tokyo 2020, says coach Luo". www.xinhuanet.com. Retrieved 23 November 2020.[dead link]
  3. ^ "Profile:Luo Yigang". www.badmintoncn.com. Retrieved 23 November 2020.
  4. ^ Sachetat, Raphaël (16 June 2018). "Zhang Ning fired". www.badzine.net. Retrieved 23 November 2020.