Ministry for Europe and Foreign Affairs
Ministria për Europën dhe Punëve të Jashtme
Department overview
Formed4 December 1912; 109 years ago (1912-12-04)
Dissolved1939–1943
JurisdictionCouncil of Ministers
HeadquartersBulevardi Zhan D'Ark 63, 1017 Tirana, Albania
Minister responsible
Websitepunetejashtme.gov.al

The Ministry for Europe and Foreign Affairs (Albanian: Ministria për Europën dhe Punët e Jashtme) is a department of the Albanian Government, in charge of diplomacy, foreign policy and the process of admission of Albania into the European Union. The ministry also provides support to Albanian citizens residing abroad. In September 2017, the ministry was restructured and it was merged with the Ministry of European Integration.[1]

History

Establishment

The establishment of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MFA) of the modern Albanian state dates back to the creation of the Provisional Government of Vlora on December 4, 1912, a few days after declaring Albania's secession from the Ottoman Empire. The Prime Minister of the Provisional Government, Ismail Qemali, also held the post of Minister of Foreign Affairs until June 1913.[2] Later this function passed to Myfit Bey Libohova who exercised it until the end of January 1914. The MFA in this period functioned as a section of the Provisional Government, with the main objective ensuring the recognition of Albania's independence from the Great Powers at the London Conference of Ambassadors.[citation needed] To accomplish this goal were also accomplished the first diplomatic services as was the diplomatic deployment of the Government of Vlora at the Ambassadorial Conference, headed by the personal diplomat of the Prime Minister, which was Rasih Dino.[3]

1914–1920

On March 7, 1914, the German prince Wilhelm Friedrich Heinrich arrives in Durrës. The Prince of Albania appointed on 17 March 1914 the "definitive government". The first Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs of the newly recognized Albanian state was Turhan Pashë Përmeti,[4] former ambassador of the Ottoman Empire in Saint Petersburg. Turhan Pasha remained foreign minister until May 28, 1914, later replaced by Prenk Bib Doda and the latter, after July, was followed by Mehmet Konica.[5]

Since Italy and Austria-Hungary were the authors of the formula for recognition of Albania's independence, Captain Castoldi, an Italian officer, was "commanded" at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs for diplomatic missions. He and the Austrian diplomat Carl Buchberger formed the prince's political cabinet.[6] The first official Albanian diplomatic representation was established in Vienna, represented by Syrja bey Vlora, and in Rome, represented by Myfid bej Libohova. The government and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Albania operated until the eve of the First World War in September 1914. On September 3, Prince William of Wied left Albania and the country turned into a theater of war in the Balkan states and the Great Powers.[citation needed]

1920–1925

In January 1920, in Lushnje, at the initiative of Albanian patriots and intellectuals of the time, a Congress was convened with representatives from all the liberated provinces of Albania, which would elect Albanian national government away from Italian influences. On January 30, 1920, the Albanian national government was created, with a broad support base.[7]

Its prime minister was Sulejman Delvina and Minister of Foreign Affairs Mehmet Konica.[8] Since the Peace Conference in Paris left unresolved recognition of the independence and borders of Albania, as set forth in 1913, Foreign Minister Konica immediately embarked on the key European chancellors of the time to secure their support in reaching a decision-making for Albania. To build a foreign professional service, with a special decision of the Council of Ministers, in October 1920, the Minister of Foreign Affairs, M.Konica, was asked to find a consul from the old Austrian consuls to be hired for a 2-year period for organizing Albanian consulates and serving as teachers for those who wanted to enter the consular service of Albania. Then, in August 1921, the National Council (parliament), upon the proposal of the Foreign Policy Committee, decided to open the Albanian consulates in Brindisi, Trieste and Florence.[citation needed]

Officeholders (1912–present)

No. Name
Term in office
1 Ismail Qemali 4 December 1912 22 January 1914
2 Turhan Pasha Përmeti 14 March 1914 20 May 1914
3 Prenk Bib Doda 28 May 1914 3 September 1914
4 Pavli Tërka 5 October 1914 27 January 1916
* Mehmed Konica[a]
Mehdi Frashëri
[b]
25 December 1918 29 January 1920
5 Mehmed Konica 30 January 1920 14 November 1920
6 Ilias Vrioni 15 November 1920 1 July 1921
7 Pandeli Evangjeli 11 July 1921 6 December 1921
8 Fan Noli 6 December 1921 12 December 1921
9 Xhafer Villa 12 December 1921 24 December 1921
Fan Noli[c] 24 December 1921 11 September 1922
Pandeli Evangjeli 11 September 1922 25 February 1924
Ilias Vrioni 3 March 1924 10 June 1924
10 Sulejman Delvina 16 June 1924 24 December 1924
11 Gjergj Koleci
Mufid Libohova
6 January 1925 31 January 1925
12 Mufid Libohova 1 February 1925 23 September 1925
13 Hysein Vrioni 28 September 1925 10 February 1927
Ilias Vrioni 12 February 1927 18 April 1929
14 Rauf Fico 18 April 1929 11 April 1931
Hysein Vrioni 20 April 1931 7 December 1932
Xhafer Villa 11 January 1933 16 October 1935
15 Fuad Asllani 21 October 1935 7 November 1936
16 Ekrem Libohova 9 November 1936 7 April 1939
* Mihal Sherko[d] 8 April 1939 12 April 1939
17 Xhemil Dino 12 April 1939 25 May 1939
Mehmed Konica 5 November 1943 7 February 1944
18 Bahri Omari 7 February 1944 16 June 1944
* Omer Nishani[e] 28 May 1944 11 January 1946
19 Eqrem Vlora 18 July 1944 28 August 1944
* Ibrahim Biçaku[f] 6 September 1944 25 November 1944
20 Omer Nishani 23 October 1944 9 February 1946
21 Enver Hoxha 9 February 1946 31 July 1953
22 Behar Shtylla 1 August 1953 16 March 1966
23 Nesti Nase 17 March 1966 15 June 1982
24 Reis Malile 15 June 1982 21 February 1991
25 Muhamet Kapllani 22 February 1991 6 December 1991
26 Ilir Boçka 18 December 1991 13 April 1992
27 Alfred Serreqi 13 April 1992 10 July 1996
28 Tritan Shehu 11 July 1996 1 March 1997
29 Arian Starova 11 March 1997 24 July 1997
30 Paskal Milo 25 July 1997 6 September 2001
31 Arta Dade 6 September 2001 25 July 2002
32 Ilir Meta 29 July 2002 18 July 2003
33 Kastriot Islami 29 December 2003 10 September 2005
34 Besnik Mustafaj 11 September 2005 30 April 2007
35 Lulzim Basha 1 May 2007 17 September 2009
Ilir Meta 17 September 2009 14 September 2010
36 Edmond Haxhinasto 17 September 2010 2 July 2012
37 Edmond Panariti 3 July 2012 4 April 2013
38 Aldo Bumçi 4 April 2013 15 September 2013
39 Ditmir Bushati 15 September 2013 18 January 2019
40 Edi Rama
Gent Cakaj
22 January 2019 31 December 2020
41 Olta Xhaçka 4 January 2021 Incumbent

Notes

  1. ^ The title "Substitutive" (gheg albanian: Zavëndësisht), often using the acronym "Zav.", references to the temporary exercise of duty by an official who was not formally appointed by the prime minister but occupied the interim role of the vacant minister. These officials are labeled in the list with an asterisk.
  2. ^ Konica and Frashëri were delegates of foreign affairs.
  3. ^ Xhafer Ypi served concurrently as substitutive minister of foreign affairs.
  4. ^ Mihal Sherko was member in charge of foreign affairs.
  5. ^ Omer Nishani was member in charge of foreign affairs.
  6. ^ Ibrahim Biçaku was substitutive minister of foreign affairs.

See also

References

  1. ^ Dervishi, Kastriot (2006). Historia e Shtetit Shqiptar 1912–2005. Shtëpia Botuese "55". p. 955. ISBN 99943-799-3-3.
  2. ^ "First Government of Albania". ShtetiWeb.
  3. ^ Puto, Arben (1982). L'indépendance albanaise et la diplomatie des grandes puissances: 1912–1914. Editions "8 Nëntori". p. 277.
  4. ^ Pearson 2006, pp. 117.
  5. ^ *Constantin Anastas Chekrezi, ed. (February 1919). "The Provisional Albanian Government – Hail, Free Albania!". The Adriatic Review. Boston, MA: Vatra. 1 (5–6): 186. Retrieved 2013-12-16.
  6. ^ Buchberger, Carl (1973). "Erinnerungen aus meinen albanischen Jahren 1911–1914". Studia Albanica. pp. 237–254.
  7. ^ "Government of Sulejman Delvina". ShtetiWeb.
  8. ^ Lufta e popullit shqiptar per çlirimin kombetar, 1918–1920 ..., Volume 2 By Muin Çami page 64 ([1])