Pittsburgh Public Schools
Map of Allegheny County Pennsylvania School Districts.png
Location
United States
District information
TypePublic school
MottoExpect Great Things
GradesPre-K–12
Established1835[1]
SuperintendentWayne Walters [2]
Budget$668.3 million
Students and staff
Students20,350
Athletic conferencePIAA District 8
Other information
WebsitePittsburgh Public Schools
Board of Education's Administration Building in Oakland
Board of Education's Administration Building in Oakland

Pittsburgh Public Schools is the public school district serving the city of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (except for two small parts served by the Baldwin-Whitehall School District) and adjacent Mount Oliver. As of the 2021–2022 school year, the district operates 54 schools with 4,192 employees (2,070 teachers) and 20,350 students, and has a budget of $668.3 million.[3] According to the district's 2021 budget, based on the 2010 U.S. Census, the combined land area served is 55.3 square miles (143 km2), with a population of 309,359.[4]

History

The formation of Pittsburgh's public schools in 1835 was due to the passing of the Pennsylvania Free Public School Act of 1834. This act provided government aid for establishing a city school system, which included the creation of four self-governed wards. Twenty years later, the wards were disbanded, and the Central Board of Education was founded. This board would govern the entire school district, which would consist of nine wards or sub- districts. The first city superintendent of schools was elected in 1868. In 1911, the School Code of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania modified the existing system to include a Board of Public education that would oversee sixty-one sub-districts and two central boards. The Public School Code (Title 22) of 1949 further regulated the provisions and establishment of Pennsylvania state schools.[1]

As stated in numerous district annual budgets, including 2021, "Although public education in Pittsburgh dates back to 1835, the consolidated District was founded in November 1911, as a result of an educational reform movement that combined the former 'ward' schools into one system with standardized educational and business policies. Initially the district was governed by an appointed Board of 15 members, but since 1976 has been governed by a nine-member Board elected by districts of relatively equal populations."[4]

Academics

In February 2006, eight underperforming schools were transformed into Accelerated Learning Academies(ALAs).[5][6] The schools had 10 days added to their school calendar and 45 minutes of instructional time were added each day.[7][8] The ALAs use the America's Choice Design Model,[9] developed by the National Center on Education and the Economy.

In March 2006, the district contracted with Kaplan K12 Learning Services to develop a single, district-wide curriculum.[10]

The Pittsburgh Promise

On December 13, 2006 Pittsburgh Mayor Luke Ravenstahl and then Superintendent Mark Roosevelt announced an initiative called The Pittsburgh Promise. In 2008, the program became available to all graduates satisfying the criteria for a scholarship to any accredited post-secondary institution within Pennsylvania. The five to seven million dollars per year necessary to fund the program would be raised through private contributions from foundations and corporations.[11][12]

In January 2007, the Pittsburgh Federation of Teachers made the first contribution to The Pittsburgh Promise scholarship program.[13] In 2008, the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center made a $10 million donation with a commitment for as much as $90 million in additional matching funds over the next nine years.[14]

Board of Public Education of Pittsburgh

The Pittsburgh Public Schools has an elected, nine-member Board of Directors. The members serve a four-year term and represent districts within the city and the nearby borough of Mount Oliver.[15] Like all other school board members in Pennsylvania, they receive no pay.[16]

Schools

Elementary schools (K–5)

K–8 Schools

Middle Schools (6–8) and Accelerated Learning Academies

Secondary Schools, grades 9-12 and 6-12

Special schools

Charter schools

As required by Pennsylvania state law, the District funds a number of charter schools:[17]

Closed schools

School Location Opened Closed Notes
Arlington Middle School Arlington 1996[21] 2004[22]
Baxter Middle School Homewood North 1908 1978[23] Now Student Achievement Center.
Belmar Elementary School Homewood North 1903[24] 2004[22] Used as Homewood Montessori (2004-2006) and Lincoln 6-8 (2006–2011). Now vacant.[25]
Beltzhoover Elementary School Beltzhoover 1909 2004[22]
Bon Air Elementary School Bon Air 1956[26] 2006[27]
Burgwin Elementary School Hazelwood 1937[28] 2006[27]
Chartiers Elementary School Windgap 1959[29] 2004[22] Now Chartiers Early Childhood Center.
Chatham Elementary School Perry North 1924[30] 2006[27]
Clayton Elementary School Perry South 1958[31] 2006[27]
Columbus Middle School Perry South 1967[32] 2006[27]
Clifford B. Connelley Vocational High School Crawford-Roberts/Uptown Pittsburgh 1930 2004[22] Secondary School
Crescent Elementary School East Hills 1939[33] 2006[27]
H. B. Davis Elementary School Squirrel Hill South 1932[34] 1980[35] Demolished in 1984.[36]
East Hills Elementary School East Hills 1972[37] 2006[27]
Fifth Avenue High School Uptown 1894 1976
Fort Pitt Elementary School Garfield 1905 2012[38]
Frick Middle School North Oakland 1927 2009[39] Now Pittsburgh Science and Technology Academy.
Friendship Elementary School Friendship 1899 2006[27] Now Pittsburgh Montessori School.
Gladstone Middle School Hazelwood 1914 2001[40] Was also a high school from 1960 to 1976.
Greenway Middle School Crafton Heights 1974[41] 2006[27] Now Pittsburgh Classical Academy Middle School.
Knoxville Middle School Knoxville 1927 2006[27]
Larimer Elementary School Larimer 1896 1980[35]
Lee Elementary School Beechview 1912 1980[35]
Lemington Elementary School Lincoln–Lemington–Belmar 1937 2006[27]
Madison Elementary School Upper Hill 1902 2006[27]
Horace Mann Elementary School Marshall-Shadeland 1874[42] 2006[27]
McCleary Elementary School Upper Lawrenceville 1900 2006[27]
William H. McKelvy Elementary School Bedford Dwellings 1916[43] 2001[40] Now Miller African Centered Academy.
McNaugher Middle School Perry South 1909[44] 1983[32]
Margaret Milliones Middle School Upper Hill 1928[45] 2006[25] Originally Herron Hill Junior High. Now University Prep 6-12.[25]
Morningside Elementary School Morningside 1897 2006[27]
Samuel F. B. Morse Elementary School South Side Flats 1874 1980[35]
Murray Elementary School Mount Oliver 1955[46] 2012[38] Now Arlington PreK-8.
Northview Heights Elementary School Northview Heights 1962[47] 2012[38]
David B. Oliver High School Marshall-Shadeland 1925 2012[38] Now Oliver Citywide Academy.
Peabody High School East Liberty 1911 2011 Now Barack Obama Academy of International Studies 6-12.
Prospect Middle School Mount Washington 1931 2006[27]
Regent Square Elementary School Regent Square 1928[45] 2004[22] Now Environmental Charter School.
Florence Reizenstein Middle School Shadyside 1975 2008 Used as Schenley High (2008–2011) and Obama Academy 6-12 (2009–2012). Demolished in 2013.[25]
Arthur J. Rooney Sr. Middle School Brighton Heights 1997[48] 2010[49] Now Morrow 6-8.
Schaeffer Elementary School Crafton Heights 1960[50] 2012[38]
Schenley High School North Oakland 1916 2011[25] The Schenley building was closed in 2008, but the name continued to be used at a different location until the last class of existing students graduated in 2011.[25]
Sheraden Elementary School Sheraden 1959[50] 2006[27]
South Hills High School Mount Washington 1917[51] 1986[52]
South Vocational-Technical High School South Side Flats 1897 2004[22]
Spring Garden Elementary School Troy Hill 1939[33] 2004[22] Now Spring Garden Early Childhood Center.
Thaddeus Stevens Elementary School Elliott 1939[33] 2012[38]
Washington Polytechnic Middle School Central Lawrenceville 1937 2006[27]
West Side Traditional Academy Fairywood 1922[53] 2001[40] Originally Fairywood Elementary.
Wightman School Squirrel Hill North 1897 1980[35]

See also

Notes and references

  1. ^ a b "Historical Sketch of the Pittsburgh Public Schools". Historic Pittsburgh. University of Pittsburgh Library System. Retrieved February 16, 2022.
  2. ^ "Superintendent of Schools / Homepage".
  3. ^ "Facts at a Glance". Pittsburgh Public Schools. Retrieved February 16, 2022.
  4. ^ a b "2021 Final General Fund Budget" (PDF). Pittsburgh Public Schools. Retrieved February 16, 2022.
  5. ^ "Accelerated Learning Academies". Pittsburgh Public Schools Web Site. Archived from the original on 2006-12-18. Retrieved 2006-12-20.
  6. ^ "Accelerated Learning Academies". Pittsburgh Public Schools Web Site. Archived from the original on 2006-10-14. Retrieved 2006-12-20.
  7. ^ "Accelerated Learning Academy 2006-2007 School Calendar". Pittsburgh Public Schools Web Site. 2006-05-01. Archived from the original on 2006-12-16. Retrieved 2006-12-20.
  8. ^ "PPS ALAs Frequently Asked Questions" (PDF). Pittsburgh Public Schools Web Site. Retrieved 2006-12-20.[dead link]
  9. ^ "America's Choice". NCEE Web Site. Retrieved 2006-12-20.[dead link]
  10. ^ "Superintendent Roosevelt Releases Comprehensive Reform Agenda" (PDF). Pittsburgh Public Schools. Retrieved February 16, 2022.
  11. ^ "Mayor Luke Ravenstahl and Superintendent Mark Roosevelt Announce Partnership to Create The Pittsburgh Promise" (PDF) (Press release). Pittsburgh Public Schools. 2006-12-13. Retrieved 2006-12-13.[permanent dead link]
  12. ^ Lord, Rich (2006-12-13). "City schools to promise college funds for good students". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Retrieved 2006-12-13.
  13. ^ Smydo, Joe (2007-01-12). "Teachers union gives $10,000 to new city scholarship fund". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Retrieved 2007-01-13.
  14. ^ "UPMC Community Citizenship". Archived from the original on 2009-04-12. Retrieved 2009-06-01.
  15. ^ "Board of Directors". Pittsburgh Public Schools. Retrieved February 16, 2022.
  16. ^ "How to Run for School Board: A Guide for School Board Candidates in Pennsylvania". Pennsylvania School Boards Association. Retrieved February 16, 2022.
  17. ^ "Pennsylvania Charter School Websites". The Center for Education Reform Website. Retrieved 2007-01-03.
  18. ^ "MINUTES Meeting of: March 2 1,2007" (PDF). Pittsburgh Public Schools. pp. p.640-1. Retrieved 2007-04-26.[dead link]
  19. ^ Smydo, Joe (2006-11-09). "City schools want to close 2 more charter schools". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Retrieved 2007-04-26.
  20. ^ "Board denies renewal of E. Liberty charter school". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. 2007-04-26. Retrieved 2007-04-26.
  21. ^ Lee, Carmen J. (September 4, 1996). "Neighborhood Schools Open". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Retrieved November 19, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  22. ^ a b c d e f g h Schaarsmith, Amy McConnell (May 27, 2004). "Board Spares 3 Schools". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Retrieved November 19, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  23. ^ Mannella, Susan (January 18, 1980). "Baxter's Ex-Pupils Win Reizenstein Nod". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Retrieved November 11, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  24. ^ "Belmar School". Historic Pittsburgh. Retrieved November 19, 2021.
  25. ^ a b c d e f Chute, Eleanor (March 10, 2013). "City Schools Spent $23M on now-closed buildings". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Retrieved November 11, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  26. ^ "School Starts for 271,293". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. September 3, 1956. Retrieved November 15, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  27. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r Hilston, James (March 1, 2006). "Approved school plan". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Retrieved November 19, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  28. ^ "Dr. Graham Hails New School". Pittsburgh Sun-Telegraph. May 20, 1937. Retrieved November 15, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  29. ^ "Overcrowding Eased in 2 Schools". Pittsburgh Sun-Telegraph. February 5, 1959. Retrieved November 19, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  30. ^ "Room for Many More Pupils on School Opening". Pittsburgh Press. August 24, 1924. Retrieved November 15, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  31. ^ "77,136 Expected in Schools". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. August 18, 1958. Retrieved November 15, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  32. ^ a b Chute, Eleanor (August 25, 1983). "North Side School Changes Boggle Mind". Pittsburgh Press. Retrieved November 15, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  33. ^ a b c "New Schools To Close Old". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. July 10, 1939. Retrieved November 15, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  34. ^ Botsford, W. P. (January 1, 1933). "Public Schools Greatly Improved in 1932". Pittsburgh Press. Retrieved November 11, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  35. ^ a b c d e "Here Are Changes In School Assignments". Pittsburgh Press. August 31, 1980. Retrieved November 11, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  36. ^ "Nursing home on Davis School site". Pittsburgh Press. July 15, 1984. Retrieved November 11, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  37. ^ Nilsson, David (January 9, 1973). "Major Assignment Faces Teachers, Pupils". Pittsburgh Press. Retrieved November 16, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  38. ^ a b c d e f "Board Approves District Realignment Plan for 2012-13 School Year" (PDF). Pittsburgh Public Schools. Retrieved November 15, 2021.
  39. ^ Horn, Brittany; Gideon, Gavan (June 8, 2013). "First class graduating tonight at city Sci-Tech". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Retrieved November 11, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  40. ^ a b c Lee, Carmen J. (August 16, 2001). "Board reaffirms 7 public school closings". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Retrieved November 19, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  41. ^ "West End School Will Not Open Until September". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. January 12, 1974. Retrieved November 16, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  42. ^ Moore, Arthur T. (April 29, 1958). "926 Study In 'Poor Fire Risk' School". Pittsburgh Sun-Telegraph. Retrieved November 16, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  43. ^ "Modified Gary School Plan for City". Pittsburgh Gazette Times. January 24, 1916. Retrieved November 19, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  44. ^ "McNaugher School to Be Opened". Pittsburgh Gazette Times. September 20, 1909. Retrieved November 15, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  45. ^ a b "Local Schools Open Tuesday". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. September 3, 1928. Retrieved November 19, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  46. ^ "Highest Enrollment In City Public Schools Since 1949 Expected". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. August 25, 1955. Retrieved November 16, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  47. ^ Stein, Herbert G. (September 4, 1962). "Most Schools Open Today In County". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Retrieved November 16, 2021.
  48. ^ "Rooney school dedication". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. April 21, 1998. Retrieved November 15, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  49. ^ Chute, Eleanor (October 27, 2010). "Who's on first in city schools? You tell us". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Retrieved November 15, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  50. ^ a b Stein, Herbert (August 21, 1960). "New Schools Spring Up In Every Section". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Retrieved 17 November 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  51. ^ "New South Hills High School To Open Tomorrow". Pittsburgh Press. April 8, 1917. Retrieved November 19, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  52. ^ Gallagher, Jim (June 5, 1986). "Tears flow as South Hills High closes". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Retrieved November 19, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  53. ^ "New Schools To Care For 2,700 Students". Pittsburgh Gazette Times. September 3, 1922. Retrieved November 19, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  54. ^ Smydo, Joe (2006-09-28). "School board votes to close Career Connections school". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Retrieved 2007-01-03.
  55. ^ Smydo, Joe (2006-11-17). "Charter middle school to shut Nov. 29". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Retrieved 2007-04-26.

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