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Pittsburgh Bureau of Fire
Pittsburgh Bureau of Fire Logo.png
Operational area
Country United States
State Pennsylvania
City Pittsburgh
Agency overview[2]
EstablishedSeptember 12, 1793
Annual calls65,236 (2012)
Employees670[1]
StaffingCareer
Fire chiefDarryl Jones
EMS levelBLS
IAFF1
Facilities and equipment[2]
Divisions3
Battalions4
Stations30
Engines28
Trucks11
Rescues0
Ambulances0
HAZMAT2
USAR0
Fireboats1
Light and air2
Website
Official website
Official IAFF

The Pittsburgh Bureau of Fire (PBF) provides fire suppression and prevention for the City of Pittsburgh, as well as BLS response on medical details.[3] In all, the bureau is responsible for 55.5 square miles (144 km2) with a population of 305,841 as of the 2013 Census estimation.[4] The Bureau was the first fire department in the United States to unionize and thus has the International Association of Fire Fighters (IAFF) local number of 1.[5]

The Fire Bureau provides fire/rescue services to the Borough of Wilkinsburg and Ingram Borough through the use of two engine companies.

History

The Bureau started out as a volunteer fire department and officially transitioned to a fully paid department on May 23, 1870.[5] Over 30 years later in 1903 a group of Pittsburgh firefighters sought to improve working and living conditions of those serving in the department. They formed an association known as the City Fireman's Protective Association. By September 1903, the first International Association of Fire Fighters union was organized, IAFF Local No. 1.[5]

Stations and apparatus

The quarters of Engine 3 in the Strip District
The quarters of Engine 3 in the Strip District

Below is a complete listing of all fire station and apparatus locations in the city of Pittsburgh according to Battalion.

Fire Station Number Neighborhood Engine Company Truck Company Special Unit [a] Deputy Chief or Battalion Chief Unit Battalion
3 Strip District Engine 3 M.A.C. 1, M.A.C. 2 2
4 Uptown Engine 4 Truck 4 Deputy Chief 2
6 Lawrenceville Engine 6 Truck 6 Water Rescue Raft, Foam Trailer 3
7 Stanton Heights Engine 7 Arson Unit 1, Arson Unit 2, Arson Unit 3 3
8 East Liberty Engine 8 Truck 8 Battalion Chief 3 3
10 Hill District Engine 10 PEMS Medic 5 2
12 Greenfield Engine 12 PEMS Medic 7 2
13 Hazelwood Engine 13 Truck 13 2
14 Oakland Truck 14 Battalion Chief 2 2
15 Lincoln-Lemington Engine 15 3
16 Wilkinsburg Engine 16 3
17 Homewood Engine 17 Truck 17 Water Rescue Raft 3
18 Squirrel Hill Engine 18 PBP Zone 4 2
19 Swisshelm Park Engine 19 3
20 Hays Engine 20 PEMS Medic 12 4
22 Arlington Engine 22 4
23 Carrick Engine 23 Command Unit 200 4
24 South Side Engine 24 Truck 24 Water Rescue Raft, Utility 4 Battalion Chief 4 4
26 Brookline Engine 26 Truck 26 4
27 Mt. Washington Engine 27 4
28 Beechview Engine 28 4
29 Westwood Engine 29 Haz-Mat Foam Unit 29 4
30 Elliott Engine 30 Truck 30 1
31 Sheraden Engine 31 1
32 East Allegheny Engine 32 Truck 32 Haz-Mat Spill Unit 1 1
33 Woods Run Truck 33 1
34 Observatory Hill Engine 34 1
35 Brighton Heights Engine 35 1
37 Manchester Engine 37 Haz-Mat Foam Unit 37 Battalion Chief 1 1
38 Northview Heights Engine 38 1

Notes

  1. ^ Water rescue, Hazmat and Medic units are EMS Division apparatus quartered at Fire Stations.

In pop culture

References

  1. ^ City of Pittsburgh, Office of Management and Budget. "CoP Operating Budget FY 2020" (PDF). pittsburghpa.gov/omb/budgets-reports. City of PGH OMB. Retrieved 23 December 2020.
  2. ^ a b "Response Statistics". Pittsburgh Bureau of Fire. Retrieved 10 March 2015.
  3. ^ "About the Bureau". Pittsburgh Bureau of Fire. Retrieved 10 March 2015.
  4. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2014-06-11.
  5. ^ a b c "Pittsburgh Fire Fighters History". IAFF Local 1. Retrieved 10 March 2015.