Rumworth and Daubhill
LocationBolton, Greater Manchester, Bolton
England
Coordinates53°33′43″N 2°27′14″W / 53.5619°N 2.4540°W / 53.5619; -2.4540Coordinates: 53°33′43″N 2°27′14″W / 53.5619°N 2.4540°W / 53.5619; -2.4540
Grid referenceSD700073
Platforms2
Other information
StatusDisused
History
Original companyLondon and North Western Railway
Pre-groupingLNWR
Post-groupingLondon, Midland and Scottish Railway
Key dates
2 February 1885Station opened as "Daubhill"
28 April 1885Renamed "Rumworth and Daubhill"
3 March 1952Closed to passengers
29 March 1965Closed completely

Rumworth and Daubhill railway station was in the Daubhill area of south-west Bolton, Greater Manchester, on a deviation of the original Bolton Great Moor St to Kenyon Junction line. The station replaced an earlier station on the original line of the railway that had been served by a stationary engine. It was open from 1885 until 1952 for passengers and 1965 for freight.

History

The Bolton and Leigh Railway (B&LR) opened for goods traffic in 1828, followed by passenger services in 1831.[1] The original railway included two inclines worked by stationary engines, one of which was situated at Daubhill, south of Bolton Great Moor Street railway station (originally called just Bolton) with the line climbing up out of Bolton.[2][3]

The stationary engines played a prominent role on the line for at least 15 years and it is believed they remained in operation until about 1846.[4] Cable haulage was discontinued once locomotive performance had improved sufficiently.[5]

The incline at Daubhill was superseded by a deviation built by the London and North Western Railway (LNWR) in 1885, the LNWR was by then the owner and operator of the line.[6] The deviation also enabled the LNWR to increase capacity by doubling the line.[7]

A new Daubhill railway station was built on the deviation to replace the original Daubhill station at the top of the incline. The station opened on 2 February 1885[8] and was renamed Rumworth and Daubhill railway station on the 28 April 1885.[9]

The deviation ran in a cutting and the station was built with two platforms on the outsides of the tracks with the station building above reached by steps either side.[10] The station was located at the intersection of St Helens Road and Dean Church Road, the railway ran diagonally underneath this intersection.[11]

A station had a small goods yard.[12] Holland says this was leased for many years to the Hulton Colliery Company.[13]

Rumworth and Daubhill closed to passengers on 3 March 1952,[9] although local services continued to pass through until all regular passenger services from Bolton Great Moor St were withdrawn on 27 March 1954.[14]

After closure the station was demolished and the cutting in which the station was located has been infilled leaving no trace of the station or railways existence.[citation needed]


Preceding station   Disused railways   Following station
Bolton Great Moor Street
Line and station closed
  London and North Western Railway   Chequerbent
Line and station closed

References

  1. ^ Shaw 1983.
  2. ^ Butt 1995, p. 38.
  3. ^ Holland 2001, p. 11.
  4. ^ Simpson 1990.
  5. ^ Sweeney 1996, p. 7.
  6. ^ Holt & Biddle 1986, p. 184.
  7. ^ Holland 2001, p. 20.
  8. ^ Butt 1995, p. 77.
  9. ^ a b Butt 1995, p. 201.
  10. ^ Holland 2001, p. 22.
  11. ^ Holland 2001, p. 43.
  12. ^ RCH (1904) 1970, p. 67.
  13. ^ Holland 2001, p. 33.
  14. ^ Holland 2001, p. 144.

Sources

  • Butt, R. V. J. (1995). The Directory of Railway Stations: details every public and private passenger station, halt, platform and stopping place, past and present (1st ed.). Sparkford: Patrick Stephens Ltd. ISBN 978-1-85260-508-7. OCLC 60251199.
  • Holland, Bert (2001). Plodder Lane for Farnworth. Leigh: Triangle Publishing. ISBN 978-0-9529333-6-6.
  • Holt, Geoffrey O.; Biddle, Gordon (1986). The North West. A Regional history of the railways of Great Britain. 10 (2nd ed.). David St. John Thomas. ISBN 978-0-946537-34-1. OCLC 643506870.
  • The Railway Clearing House (1970) [1904]. The Railway Clearing House Handbook of Railway Stations 1904 (1970 D&C Reprint ed.). Newton Abbot: David & Charles Reprints. ISBN 0-7153-5120-6.
  • Shaw, William Stuart (1983). "A Concise History of the Bolton & Leigh Railway". Wigan: Wigan MBC Leisure Department. Retrieved 20 December 2018.
  • Simpson, Bill (1990), Railways in and around Bolton: An historical review, Foxline publishing, ISBN 1-870119-11-8
  • Sweeney, Dennis J. (1996). A Lancashire Triangle Part One. Leigh: Triangle Publishing. ISBN 978-0-9529333-0-4.