State Administration Council
နိုင်ငံတော်စီမံအုပ်ချုပ်ရေးကောင်စီ
State Seal of Myanmar
Overview
Established2 February 2021 (2021-02-02)
StateMyanmar
LeaderChairman (Min Aung Hlaing)
Appointed byCommander-in-Chief of Defence Services exercising emergency powers[1]
Responsible toCommander-in-Chief of Defence Services
WebsiteOfficial website

The State Administration Council (Burmese: နိုင်ငံတော်စီမံအုပ်ချုပ်ရေးကောင်စီ; abbreviated SAC or နစက) is the military junta[2] currently governing Myanmar, established by Commander-in-Chief of Defence Services Min Aung Hlaing following the February 2021 coup d'état and the declaration of a state of emergency by the National Defence and Security Council.[3][4] Under the constitution, the commander-in-chief holds absolute legislative, executive, and judicial power during a state of emergency. Min Aung Hlaing has delegated his legislative power to the SAC, which he chairs.[5] It has formed a provisional administration, also led by Min Aung Hlaing as Prime Minister of Myanmar.[6]

The Committee Representing Pyidaungsu Hluttaw (CRPH) has designated the SAC as a "terrorist group",[7] and SAC's legitimacy is contested by the competing National Unity Government of Myanmar (NUG).

History

Formation

The State Administration Council was formed by Min Aung Hlaing on 2 February 2021 with 11 members in the aftermath of the 2021 Myanmar coup d'état.[1][8][9] On 3 February, five civilian members were added to the council.[10][11][12] On 17 March, a civilian joined the council.[13] On 30 March, a military officer and a civilian joined the council.[14] As of late August, in total, the council comprises nine military officers and ten civilians.[15]

In the leadup to and in the aftermath of the coup d'état, the military had made overtures to political parties allied with the Union Solidarity and Development Party (USDP), the military proxy party.[16][17] On 14 August 2020, 34 pro-military parties including USDP had met with Min Aung Hlaing to seek assurances from the military to intervene in the event of electoral integrity issues during the upcoming 2020 Myanmar general election.[18][16] Min Aung Hlaing's remarks during the meeting raised concerns that the military had threatened to stage a coup.[19]

As of late August 2021, ten civilian members of the SAC include eight party's politicians, Sai Lone Saing and Shwe Kyein of the USDP, Mahn Nyein Maung of the Kayin People's Party (KPP), Thein Nyunt of the New National Democracy Party (NNDP), Khin Maung Swe of the National Democratic Force (NDF), Aye Nu Sein of the Arakan National Party (ANP), Banyar Aung Moe of the Mon Unity Party (MUP) and Saw Daniel, formerly of the Kayah State Democratic Party (KySDP).[15][20][21] Khin Maung Swe and Thein Nyunt had co-founded NDF, a National League for Democracy (NLD) splinter group, while Mahn Nyein Maung was a former leader of the Karen National Union.[21]

Several organisations have distanced themselves from civilian members of the SAC. Following Mahn Nyein Maung's appointment, the KNU distanced itself from him, and reiterated its opposition to the military coup.[22] On 4 February, KySDP announced it had dismissed Saw Daniel from the party for accepting the appointment, and called for the Burmese military to honor the 2020 election results.[20]

On 5 February, SAC formed a press team led by Brigadier-General Zaw Min Tun and deputy Thet Swe.[23]

Sanctions

On 11 February, the United States government imposed sanctions on six military officers of the SAC, namely Min Aung Hlaing, Soe Win, Mya Tun Oo, Tin Aung San, Aung Lin Dwe, and Ye Win Oo. On the same day, Soe Htut, who later became a member of the SAC, was also sanctioned.[24] On 22 February, the United States government imposed sanctions on two military officers, Maung Maung Kyaw and Moe Myint Tun.[25] On 17 May and 2 July, the U.S. government imposed sanctions on four and three civilian members of the SAC, respectively.[26][27] On 17 May, the United States government designated the SAC as an object to sanctions.[26]

As of late August 2021, of all SAC members, only three civilians, Jeng Phang Naw Taung, Moung Har and Shwe Kyein, have not been sanctioned by the United States government.

Government reshuffle

SAC has terminated numerous civil servants across multiple government bodies, including the Supreme Court,[28] union-level ministries,[29] the Naypyidaw Council, and Union Civil Service Board.[30] It has quickly appointed replacements, including union ministers,[31][32][33] mayors,[34] agency executives, members of the Central Bank of Myanmar,[35][36] Union Civil Service Board,[37] judges,[38][39] and Supreme Court justices.[40][41] On 8 February, SAC appointed a new Constitutional Tribunal.[42]

On 11 February, SAC formed State and Region Administration Councils and their leaders for Myanmar's 14 states and regions.[43][44] It also appointed military officers to run Self-Administered Zone Councils for the country's autonomous zones.[45]

2 August reshuffle

Resistance and protests

Main article: 2021 Myanmar protests

On 9 February, a 36-page draft cybersecurity law proposed by SAC was circulated to Myanmar's mobile operators and telecoms license holders for industry feedback.[46] The draft bill would make internet providers accountable for preventing or removing content that "cause[s] hatred, destroy unity and tranquility" and would require ISPs to store user data at a government-prescribed location for a minimum of 3 years.[47][46] A coalition of 150 civil service organizations publicly denounced the bill for violating the fundamental rights to freedom of expression, data protection, and privacy, and other democratic norms in the digital space, and for granting state authorities the ability to ban unfavorable content, restrict ISPs, and intercept data.[46]

On 10 February, the SAC conducted late-night raids to arrest senior civilian politicians and election officials throughout the country, in an attempt to neutralize the NLD.[48] High-profile arrests include the detentions of the Chief Ministers of Tanintharyi Region, Shan, Chin, Kachin, Karen and Rakhine States, as well as dozens of township- and district-level election officials.[48]

On 11 February, SAC remitted the sentences of 23,314 prisoners.[49] Among those released were supporters of the assassin who killed Ko Ni, the NLD's legal advisor.[50] The Assistance Association for Political Prisoners expressed serious concern that the amnesty was intended to clear prison space in order to detain political prisoners.[51] A recent spate of crimes, including arson, has coincided with the timing of the amnesty.[52]

On 14 February, SAC amended existing privacy protection laws, which effectively enables the Commander-in-Chief to temporarily restrict or suspend the fundamental rights of citizens, including warrantless arrests and searches, until power is transferred to a newly elected government.[52] SAC also enacted Law 3/2021, which requires all residents to register overnight guests outside of their official household with their respective township or ward administrators.[52] The military era law had previously been repealed by the NLD-led government.[52]

On 12 February, the Ministry of Information sent directives to the Myanmar Press Council,[53] a media-adjudication and media-dispute settling body, that the media must report ethically and avoid instigating public unrest but the gradual resignation of twenty three out of twenty six members following the military coup has made it subjected to the cessation of functions. More distinctively, the directives say that the words "regime or junta" cannot be used for the State Administrative Council. Ten days after the directions of the Ministry of Information to the Press Council, Min Aung Hlaing, the military coup leader, threatened publications in Myanmar would lose their publishing licenses for the usage of the military regime or junta. Most local media said terms like "military council, junta or regime" will still be used in their reporting.[54][55]

On 1 March, the CRPH designated the SAC as a "terrorist group".[7]

Formation of caretaker government

On 1 August, SAC was re-formed as a caretaker government and Min Aung Hlaing appointed himself as prime minister of that government.[56][57] The same day, Min Aung Hlaing announced that the country's state of emergency had been extended by an additional 2 years, until elections were held.[58] On 31 July 2023, the state of emergency was extended another six months for the fourth time,[59] starting from 1 August.[60]

See more at: Provisional Government of Myanmar

Members

Current members

On 25 September 2023, the State Administration Council reconstituted itself with Order No 85/2023, along with the reshuffle of cabinet member.

The council's members are as of 25 September 2023:[61]

Name Position Took office Left office Party
1 Senior General Min Aung Hlaing Chairman 2 February 2021[1] Incumbent Tatmadaw
2 Vice Senior General Soe Win[1] Vice-chairman[1] 2 February 2021[1] Incumbent
3 Lieutenant-General Aung Lin Dwe[1] Secretary[1] 2 February 2021[1] Incumbent
4 Lieutenant-General Ye Win Oo[1] Joint Secretary[1] 2 February 2021[1] Incumbent
5 General Mya Tun Oo[1] Member[1] 2 February 2021[1] Incumbent
6 Admiral Tin Aung San[1] Member[1] 2 February 2021[1] Incumbent
7 General Maung Maung Aye Member 25 September 2023
8 Lieutenant-General Yar Pyae Member 8 February 2022[62] Incumbent
9 Lieutenant-General Nyo Saw Member 25 September 2023 Incumbent
10 Wunna Maung Lwin Member 1 February 2023 Incumbent USDP
11 Dwe Bu, Daw Member 1 February 2023 Incumbent Independent
12 Porel Aung Thein Member 1 February 2023 Incumbent USDP
13 Manh Nyein Maung Member 2 February 2021 Incumbent KPP
14 Dr Hmuh Thang Member 17 February 2023 Incumbent USDP [63]
15 Dr Ba Shwe Member 25 September 2023 Incumbent Independent
16 Khun San Lwin Member 1 February 2023 Incumbent Independent
17 Shwe Kyein Member 30 March 2021[14] Incumbent USDP[15]
18 Yan Kyaw Member 1 February 2023 Incumbent Independent

Former members

Name Position Took office Left office Party
1 General Maung Maung Kyaw[1] Member[1] 2 February 2021[1] 1 February 2023[64] Military
2 Lieutenant General Moe Myint Tun[1] Member[1] 2 February 2021[1] 24 September 2023
3 Thein Nyunt[1] Member[1] 2 February 2021[1] 1 February 2023[64] New National Democracy Party[15]
4 Khin Maung Swe[1] Member[1] 2 February 2021[1] 1 February 2023[64] National Democratic Force[15]
5 Aye Nu Sein[10] Member[10] 3 February 2021[10] 1 February 2023[64] Arakan National Party[15]
6 Jeng Phang Naw Taung[10] Member[10] 3 February 2021[10] 1 February 2023[64] Independent[15]
7 Moung Har[10] Member[10] 3 February 2021[10] 1 February 2023[64]
8 Sai Lone Saing[10] Member[10] 3 February 2021[10] 1 February 2023[64] Union Solidarity and Development Party[15]
9 Saw Daniel[10] Member[10] 3 February 2021[10] 1 February 2023[64] Kayah State Democratic Party[15][a]
10 Banyar Aung Moe[13] Member[13] 17 March 2021[13] 1 February 2023[64] Mon Unity Party[65][15]
11 Pu Gin Kam Lian Member 1 February 2023[64] 17 February 2023 ZCD
12 Maung Ko Member 1 February 2023[64] 1 August 2023 Independent
13 Dr Aung Kyaw Min Member 1 February 2023[64] 1 August 2023
14 Dr Kyaw Tun Member 1 February 2023[64] 1 August 2023

Central Advisory Body

On 1 February 2023, the SAC announced the formation of State Administration Council's Central Advisory Body under Order No 7/2023.[66]

Central Advisory Body (as of 1 February 2023)
Name Position Took Office Left Office
1 Saw Tun Aung Myint Team Leader 1 February 2023 Incumbent
2 Thein Nyunt Member
3 Khin Maung Swe
4 Aye Nu Sein
5 Moung Har
6 Sai Lone Seng
7 Saw Daniel
8 Dr Banyar Aung Moe
9 Dr Maung Maung Naing
10 Dr Kyaw Tun 2 August 2023

Territorial control

In November 2020, the Burmese military negotiated an informal ceasefire with the Arakan Army (AA), an insurgent group seeking autonomy for Rakhine State.[67] The ceasefire enabled the military to redeploy allowing thousands of troops between January and early February 2021 to the country's heartland, in the leadup and wake of the February coup.[68] In this vacuum, the AA established its own governing institutions in Rakhine State, including in Rohingya-majority areas.[67] In August 2021, the AA announced a parallel judicial system for state residents.[69] By September 2021, the AA and its political wing, the United League of Arakan (ULA) effectively controlled 75% of the state's townships.[67]

As of October 2021, over a hundred local SAC-appointed administrators in Sagaing, Magwe, and Yangon Regions have also resigned from their posts, following threats from People's Defence Force groups.[70] Local administration offices have been used to strengthen the military's administrative power, revive neighbourhood surveillance networks, and enforce SAC mandates, including registration of household guests with local authorities.[70]

On 5 September 2022, the Special Advisory Council for Myanmar (SAC-M) reported that the junta has stable territorial control in 22% (72 of 330) of townships in Myanmar, comprising only 17% of Myanmar's land area.[71] The report also noted that the regime's governance functions and administrative capacity were collapsing throughout the country, with much of Myanmar's townships now becoming contested territory, and resistance forces having effective territorial control in 39% of townships.[71] Armed resistance has been most endemic in the Bamar heartland, particularly in Magwe and Sagaing Regions, as well as parts of Kachin, Kayin, Mon, and Rakhine States.[71] On 7 September, NUG acting president Duwa Lashi La stated that the regime had lost control of half of the country, with the NUG having formed over 300 People's Defence Force battalions, and township public defence forces in 250 of the country's townships.[72]

Meetings

By end of September 2021, the SAC meeting had been held 15 times. It is unclear what an ordinal number of the coordination meeting held on 15 February 2021 was. The SAC meetings reported by state-run English newspaper are as follows.

Meeting Date Chairman
Coordination meeting[73] 15 February 2021[73] Senior General Min Aung Hlaing[73]
3rd coordination meeting[74] 22 February 2021[74] Senior General Min Aung Hlaing[74]
Meeting 4/2021[75] 1 March 2021[75] Senior General Min Aung Hlaing[75]
Meeting 5/2021[76] 8 March 2021[76] Senior General Min Aung Hlaing[76]
Meeting 6/2021[77] 15 March 2021[77] Senior General Min Aung Hlaing[77]
Meeting 7/2021[78] 22 March 2021[78] Senior General Min Aung Hlaing[78]
Meeting 8/2021[79] 30 March 2021[79] Senior General Min Aung Hlaing[79]
Meeting 9/2021[80] 26 April 2021[80] Senior General Min Aung Hlaing[80]
Meeting 10/2021[81] 10 May 2021[81] Senior General Min Aung Hlaing[81]
Meeting 11/2021[82] 24 May 2021[82] Senior General Min Aung Hlaing[82]
Meeting 12/2021[83] 7 June 2021[83] Senior General Min Aung Hlaing[83]
Meeting 13/2021[84] 7 August 2021[84] Senior General Min Aung Hlaing[84]
Meeting 14/2021[85] 23 August 2021[85] Senior General Min Aung Hlaing[85]
Meeting 15/2021[86] 24 September 2021[86] Senior General Min Aung Hlaing[86]

International recognition

An increasing number of foreign governments have curbed diplomatic ties with the military-led government, following the coup.[87] In February 2021, the Government of New Zealand officially announced it does not recognise the legitimacy of the military-led government, shortly after the coup.[87] The Government of Japan does not recognize the military-led government as Myanmar's legitimate governing body.[88] In August 2021, it refused to issue visas for two military-appointed diplomats intended to replace two Japan-based diplomats fired in March for protesting the coup.[88]

Since the coup, ASEAN has been circumspect in avoiding the impression of giving de jure recognition to SAC in official and legal communications.[89] Indonesia's foreign minister Retno Marsudi has led efforts to exclude SAC at the political level from all ASEAN meetings until democracy was restored through an inclusive process.[90] In April 2021, ASEAN member states adopted a Five-Point Consensus with respect to the Myanmar situation, calling for the immediate cessation of violence in the country, commencement of constructive dialogue for a peaceful resolution, appointment of a special ASEAN envoy to mediate on ASEAN's behalf, the provision of humanitarian assistance via the AHA Centre, and ASEAN's ability to meet with all concerned parties.[91]

On 4 October 2021, ASEAN leaders, including Indonesian foreign minister, Retno Marsudi, and Singaporean foreign minister, Vivian Balakrishnan, publicly expressed disappointment about the Burmese military's commitment to a peace plan.[92] Malaysian Foreign Minister Saifuddin Abdullah expressed the possibility that the SAC chairman, Min Aung Hlaing and the junta could be excluded from the upcoming ASEAN Summit.[92][93] ASEAN ultimately barred Min Aung Hlaing from attending the October summit.[94] As of 1 November 2021, ASEAN's official website continues to list Kyaw Tin, appointed by the civilian-led government, as Myanmar's foreign minister, and civilian-appointed Win Myint as Myanmar's head of state.[89][95]

As Myanmar's humanitarian situation has continued to decline after the coup, particularly with the execution of four political prisoners in July 2022, ASEAN member states have expressed dissatisfaction with the SAC for its intransigence in implementing ASEAN's Five-Point Consensus.[96][97] In August 2022, Indonesia's foreign minister publicly criticized SAC's failure to implement the peace plan and its broken promises.[98] In September 2022, Singapore's foreign minister expressed its disappointment in SAC's progress against the consensus.[99] On 20 September 2022, Malaysia became the first ASEAN member state to publicly engage with the competing NUG.[100]

In November 2022, the European Union instituted economic sanctions on the State Administration Council.[101]

In 2021, the United Nations General Assembly adopted a resolution condemning Myanmar's military leaders and calling for a halt in arms sales to the country. The resolution calls on the Myanmar military to respect democratic election results and release political detainees as well as urging non-recognition of the junta.[102]

Recognizes the State Administration Council

Rank Entity Notes
1  Belarus The UN General Assembly passed a resolution on June 18, 2021, urging the military of Myanmar to end violence, free political prisoners, and restore democracy after the country's coup. The UN members were urged to "prevent the flow of arms into Myanmar" by the resolution. The only nation to vote against was Belarus.[103]
2  Burkina Faso [104]
3  Cambodia Prime Minister Hun Sen was the first ASEAN head of state to visit Myanmar since the coup.[105]
4  China China has maintained close contacts with some resistance groups as well as the ruling junta.[106]
5  Egypt Cooperation between the two countries has continued since the 2021 coup.[107]
6  Eritrea [104]
7  Ethiopia [104]
8  India India has given support to the State Administration Council.[108]
9  Iran Myanmar and Iran have engaged in military-to-military cooperation since the coup.[109] The Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps are present in Myanmar and have provided military aid including drones and missiles to the Tatmadaw.[110]
10  Laos [104]
11  Mali [104]
12  Nicaragua [104]
13  North Korea Myanmar renewed ties with North Korea[111]
14  Pakistan Pakistan has increased defense cooperation since the State Administration Council took over.[112]
15  Russia Myanmar state newspapers report almost daily on cordial meetings between Russian and Myanmar officials. Min Aung Hlaing met Russian President Vladimir Putin in Moscow in September 2022, offering him overt recognition from a fellow authoritarian leader.[106]
16  Saudi Arabia Union Minister for Foreign Affairs U Than Swe received Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia to the Republic of the Union of Myanmar Mr. Saud bin Abdullah Al Subaie on 10 May 2023 at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Nay Pyi Taw. At the call, they cordially exchanged views on matters pertaining to the strengthening of existing friendly bilateral ties between Myanmar and Saudi Arabia, expanding mutually beneficial cooperation including investment and trade sectors as well as closer collaboration both at regional and international arena.[113]
17  Sri Lanka [104]
18  Syria Myanmar is considered a friendly country to the Syrian Arab Republic. On 76th anniversary of Independence Day of Syria, Assad received a congratulations from Chairman of the State Administration Council of Myanmar Min Aung Hlaing.[114]
19  Uganda [104]
20  Venezuela [104]
21  Zimbabwe [104]

Neutral stances

Rank Entity Notes
1  Algeria [104]
2  Bahrain [104]
3  Bangladesh [104]
4  Bhutan [104]
5  Brunei [104]
6  Côte d'Ivoire [104]
7  Cuba [104]
8  Djibouti [104]
9  Libya [104]
10  Mauritania [104]
11  Mongolia [104]
12    Nepal [104]
13  Somalia [104]
14  Thailand [104]
15  Timor-Leste [104]
16  Togo [104]
17  United Arab Emirates [104]
18  Yemen [104]

Opposes recognition

Rank Entity Notes
1  Albania [104]
2  Andorra [104]
3  Angola [104]
4  Antigua and Barbuda [104]
5  Argentina [104]
6  Armenia [104]
7  Austria [104]
8  Australia [104]
9  Azerbaijan [104]
10  Barbados [104]
11  Belgium [104]
12  Belize [104]
13  Bolivia [104]
14  Bosnia and Herzegovina [104]
15  Botswana [104]
16  Brazil [104]
17  Bulgaria [104]
18  Cabo Verde [104]
19  Canada [104]
20  Chile [104]
21  Colombia [104]
22  Costa Rica In a broad statement, Costa Rica stated that 137 days had gone by since a coup overthrew Myanmar's democratically elected government. However, action is only now being taken by the General Assembly. Costa Rica voted in favor of the resolution because, as she put it, "nobody's interest is served by this junta continuing." She called for an immediate stop to all sales, transfers, and direct and indirect supplies of arms and ammunition to the junta, which she claimed is using them to "fire bullets into children's eyes." "Giving the junta more weapons is akin to giving them carte blanche for violence."[115]
23  Croatia [104]
24  Cyprus [104]
25  Czechia [104]
26  Denmark [104]
27  Dominican Republic The Dominican Republic voiced concern about the ongoing attacks on civilians as well as the arbitrary incarceration of press personnel and political figures. She stressed that although the resolution passed today "amends the long silence to a certain extent," the UN should not have taken so long to respond. She urged the international community to put forth effort in finding a workable solution that would put a stop to violence and repression against civilians and assist the people of Myanmar in their quest for democratic rule.[115]
28  Ecuador [104]
29  El Salvador [104]
30  Fiji [104]
31  Finland [104]
32  France [104]
33  Gambia [104]
34  Georgia [104]
35  Germany [104]
36  Ghana [104]
37  Greece [104]
38  Grenada [104]
39  Guatemala [104]
40  Guinea-Bissau [104]
41  Guyana [104]
42  Honduras [104]
43  Hungary [104]
44  Iceland [104]
45  Indonesia [104]
46  Iraq [104]
47  Ireland [104]
48  Israel [104]
49  Italy [104]
50  Jamaica [104]
51  Japan The Government of Japan does not recognize the military-led government as Myanmar's legitimate governing body.[88]
52  Kazakhstan [104]
53  Kuwait [104]
54  Latvia [104]
55  Lebanon [104]
56  Lesotho [104]
57  Liberia [104]
58  Liechtenstein The representative of Liechtenstein introduced the draft resolution titled "The situation in Myanmar" (document A/75/L.85/Rev.1), stating that the country's circumstances are still getting worse due to the reversal of democratic transition, the deaths of nonviolent protestors, and the military's suppression of political dissent. He stressed, "There is a real and present danger of a full-fledged civil war." The result of extensive deliberations, the draft resolution promotes, enhances, and supports ASEAN's (Association of Southeast Asian Nations) efforts to put Myanmar back on the path to democracy. It expresses the General Assembly's solidarity for the populace, denounces the use of deadly force by the Burmese military, and calls for the prosecution of those responsible for atrocities against the Rohingya.[115]
59  Lithuania [104]
60  Luxembourg [104]
61  Madagascar [104]
62  Malaysia [104]
63  Maldives [104]
64  Malta [104]
65  Marshall Islands [104]
66  Mauritius [104]
67  Mexico [104]
68  Micronesia [104]
69  Moldova [104]
70  Montenegro [104]
71  Morocco [104]
72  Namibia [104]
73  Netherlands [104]
74  New Zealand [104]
75  Nigeria [104]
76  North Macedonia [104]
77  Norway [104]
78  Oman [104]
79  Palau [104]
80  Panama [104]
81  Paraguay [104]
82  Peru [104]
83  Philippines [104]
83  Poland [104]
84  Portugal [104]
85  Qatar [104]
86  Romania [104]
87  Rwanda [104]
88  Saint Vincent and the Grenadines [104]
89  Samoa [104]
90  San Marino [104]
91  São Tomé and Principe [104]
92  Senegal [104]
93  Serbia [104]
94  Seychelles [104]
94  Singapore [104]
95  Slovakia [104]
96  Slovenia [104]
97  South Africa [104]
98  South Korea [104]
99  South Sudan [104]
100  Spain [104]
101  Sudan [104]
102  Sweden [104]
103   Switzerland [104]
104  Tanzania [104]
105  Trinidad and Tobago [104]
106  Tunisia [104]
107  Turkey [104]
108  Ukraine [104]
109  United Kingdom [104]
110  United States [104]
111  Uruguay [104]
112  Vietnam [104]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Saw Daniel was expelled from the party on 4 February 2021.[20]

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad "Order No (9/2021), Office of the Commander-in-Chief of Defence Services, Republic of the Union of Myanmar" (PDF). The Global New Light of Myanmar. 3 February 2021. p. 3. Archived (PDF) from the original on 2 April 2021. Retrieved 20 April 2021.
  2. ^
  3. ^ "ဗိုလ်ချုပ်မှူးကြီး မင်းအောင်လှိုင်ခေါင်းဆောင်သည့် ၁၁ ဦးပါ စီမံအုပ်ချုပ်ရေးကောင်စီဖွဲ့စည်း". Democratic Voice of Burma (in Burmese). 2 February 2021. Archived from the original on 6 February 2021. Retrieved 2 February 2021.
  4. ^ "နိုင်ငံတော်စီမံအုပ်ချုပ်ရေးကောင်စီ ဖွဲ့စည်း". Voice of America (in Burmese). 2 February 2021. Archived from the original on 2 February 2021. Retrieved 2 February 2021.
  5. ^ "Myanmar military announces new State Administrative Council". The Myanmar Times. 2 February 2021. Archived from the original on 8 February 2022. Retrieved 13 November 2023.
  6. ^ "နိုင်ငံတော်စီမံအုပ်ချုပ်ရေးကောင်စီ စီမံခန့်ခွဲရေး ကော်မတီကို အိမ်စောင့်အစိုးရအဖွဲ့ အဖြစ် ပြင်ဆင်ဖွဲ့စည်း". Eleven Media Group (in Burmese). 1 August 2021. Archived from the original on 1 August 2021. Retrieved 15 August 2021.
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