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Network terminal nodes are at the edges of the network
Network terminal nodes are at the edges of the network

In the context of telecommunications, a terminal is a device which ends a telecommunications link and is the point at which a signal enters or leaves a network. Examples of terminal equipment include telephones, fax machines, computer terminals, printers and workstations.

An end instrument is a piece of equipment connected to the wires at the end of a telecommunications link. In telephony, this is usually a telephone connected to a local loop. End instruments that relate to data terminal equipment include printers, computers, barcode readers, automated teller machines (ATMs) and the console ports of routers.[1][2]

See also

References

  1. ^ Gnanasivam, P. (2005). Telecommunication switching and networks. New Delhi: New Age International. ISBN 81-224-1583-0. OCLC 762016601.
  2. ^ P. Gnanasivam (2005). Telecommunication Switching and Networks. New Age International. pp. 26–. ISBN 978-81-224-1583-4.