A pink velour bathrobe made of 100% polyester.
A piece of velour fabric.

Velour, occasionally velours, is a plush, knitted fabric or textile similar to velvet or velveteen. It can be made from polyester, spandex, or cotton, or a cotton-polyester blend.[1] Velour is used in a wide variety of applications, including clothing and upholstery.[2] Velour typically has a medium-length pile, shorter than velvet but longer than velveteen.[3]

Uses

Velour is a knitted fabric, which makes it stretchy (unlike velvet and velveteen, which are woven). Velour is soft and allows freedom of movement, and therefore is used for activewear and loungewear.[4] Historically, velour was cheaper than velvet and was thus often used for home furnishings and decor which would take heavy wear and tear. However, modern manufacturing techniques make velvet affordable for home furnishings. [5]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Velvet vs Velour vs Velveteen: how to Choose, Sew and Care". Dalston Mill Fabrics. Retrieved 23 January 2024.
  2. ^ "What is Velour and How Does it Differ From Velvet? | Contrado". Contrado Blog. 2018-02-16. Retrieved 2021-04-07.
  3. ^ "WHAT THE HECK IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN VELVET, VELVETEEN & VELOUR?". Modexclusive.
  4. ^ "Velvet vs Velveteen vs Velour: Uses & Comparison Videos". Threads Monthly. Retrieved 23 January 2024.
  5. ^ "What is Velour and How Does it Differ From Velvet?". Contrado. Retrieved 23 January 2024.