Zimbabwe
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s)The Sables
EmblemSable antelope
UnionZimbabwe Rugby Union
Head coachBrendon Dawson
CaptainHilton Mudariki
Home stadiumVarious
First colours
World Rugby ranking
Current31 (as of 20 March 2023)
Highest26 (2015)
Lowest57 (2007, 2008)
First international
Southern Rhodesia 11–24 British and Irish Lions
(Bulawayo, Rhodesia; 30 July 1910)
as Zimbabwe
 Kenya 24–34 Zimbabwe 
(Nairobi, Kenya, 23 May 1981)
Biggest win
 Zimbabwe 130–10 Botswana 
(Harare, Zimbabwe 9 September 1996)
Biggest defeat
 Namibia 80–6 Zimbabwe 
(Windhoek, Namibia; 15 August 2015)
World Cup
Appearances2 (First in 1987)
Best resultPool stage (1987, 1991)
Websitezimbabwerugbyunion.co.zw

The Zimbabwe national rugby union team, nicknamed the Sables, represents the Zimbabwe Rugby Union in international competition. While sides representing the colony of Rhodesia have played as early as 1910, the modern day Zimbabwe rugby team did not play its first test until 1981, against Kenya. Zimbabwe has competed in two World Cups, in 1987 and 1991, in place of South Africa, who were sanctioned by the IRB at the time due to apartheid. Zimbabwe is categorized as Tier 3 Development One, which prioritizes Zimbabwe over other nations due to historical success as well as popularity of rugby in the nation.

During the colonial days, the team had an association with touring British Isles teams, who regularly played matches against them in their tours of South Africa; the earliest tour being in 1910 when Zimbabwe was known as Southern Rhodesia. The side has also played New Zealand on several occasions, the first being in the late 1920s; Zimbabwe is the only non-Tier 1 nation to defeat the All Blacks, as the Southern Rhodesia side defeated New Zealand in 1947.

Zimbabwe currently compete in the Africa Gold Cup, considered the equivalent of the Six Nations in Africa. Zimbabwe have won the competition once, in 2012 Africa Cup, and finished runners up in 2013, 2014, and 2015. Excluding the Springboks, Zimbabwe is one of only 3 nations in Africa to qualify for the Rugby World Cup, the others being Namibia and the Ivory Coast. The Sables maintain fierce rivalries with regional neighbors Namibia and Kenya, as the respective three nations have vied for African supremacy since the 2000s.

History

Main article: Rugby union in Zimbabwe

Pre-internationals (1890–1910)

When the Pioneer Column arrived in Rhodesia from the Cape Province in 1890, it brought with it the country's first rugby players. The oldest clubs in the country, Queens and the Bulawayo Athletic Club, were formed in 1894 in Bulawayo and the Rhodesia Rugby Football Union was founded one year later in 1895.[1]

The first tour by a Rhodesian team to South Africa took place in 1898, and was composed of players from the five biggest clubs in the two major settlements of Bulawayo and Salisbury, today known as Harare.

Southern Rhodesia/Rhodesia era (1910–1979)

A British Lions team played a side called Southern Rhodesia on 30 July 1910 in Bulawayo; the British Isles team defeated Southern Rhodesia. In 1924 a British side played another match against Rhodesia, on 24 July in Salisbury, the British won 24 to 11. With this, this was the first formal national side to represent the country. On 14 July 1928, Rhodesia played in Bulawayo against New Zealand, losing 8 to 44.

During their 1938 tour to South Africa, the British Lions played two matches against Rhodesia. The first, taking place on 20 July saw the British win 25 to 11; three days later the British won again, 45 to 11; these matches were played in Salisbury and Bulawayo. The 1949 Rhodesian Rugby team, led by John Morkel, famously beat a touring All Blacks side led by Fred Allen in Bulawayo 10-8 on 27 July 1949. Three days later they drew with the mighty All Blacks in Salisbury 3-3. Allen had infamously told his team that, no matter the circumstance, the team would not complain about touring conditions, as he felt whinging would not change the result on the pitch. In spite of this pact, the team encountered a number of issues which were not voiced properly, including the traveling ship being too small, long travel routes, Māori players being left behind due to racial codes, issues with coaching and not acclimating properly to the heat and conditions.[2]

In 1960, New Zealand returned to play a match on 2 July at Glamis Park, with Rhodesia losing 14 to 29, though gave the All Blacks a scare yet again, with the game being tied 6 all by half time. The 1962 tour of South Africa by the British Lions had Rhodesia as the opening fixture on the tour. The opening game of the Lions tour saw the visitors win in Bulawayo, beating Rhodesia 38 to 9 on 26 May. The next tour, in 1962, the Lions won in Salisbury, beating the side 32 to 6. In 1973 Rhodesia played a one-off match against Italy, winning 42 to 4. In 1970, Rhodesia played New Zealand for the last time on 27 July, losing 14 to 27. Overall, Rhodesia had played New Zealand 5 times, winning once and drawing once. In 1974, the Lions were back at Salisbury where they defeated Rhodesia 42 to 6. During the 1960s and 1970s, a number of players born in Rhodesia were capped for other international sides, such as Gary Teichmann, David Curtis, and Bobby Skinstad.[3] Rhodesia's rugby playing strength reached its peak in the early to mid-1970s seasons when the country possessed 49 clubs, putting together 102 teams.[4]

Record against Tier One nations prior to 1980

Opponent Played Won Lost Drawn Win % For Aga Diff
 Argentina 1 1 0 0 100.00% 17 12 +5
 Australia 5 0 4 1 0.00% 29 106 -77
British and Irish Lions 9 0 9 0 0.00% 83 265 -182
 France 3 0 2 1 0.00% 24 66 -42
 Ireland 1 0 1 0 0.00% 0 24 -24
 New Zealand 5 1 3 1 20.00% 49 111 -62
Total 25 3 19 3 12.00% 244 588 -344

Zimbabwe era (1980–present)

1980s and 1990s - The Golden Generation

In 1980, the Rhodesia Rugby Football Union was renamed the Zimbabwe Rugby Union, reflecting the end of white minority rule in Zimbabwe, and the beginning of the new state. Previously, the Rhodesia side was exclusively all-white, in contrast to the East Africa Tuskers which had been integrated. However, the new Zimbabwe side was instead integrated, including both black and white players. A tour to England was undertaken that year playing six matches, the first against Surrey at Twickenham and one of the others being against Gloucestershire at Kingsholm on 1 October.[5] That same year, the ZRU severed all its ties to the South African Rugby Board due to mounting pressure to boycott the apartheid regime; while Zimbabwe gained international acceptance as a rugby side, they no longer had teams in the Currie Cup and other South African competitions.

They played their first international game as Zimbabwe on 7 July 1981 against Kenya, winning 34 to 24. Throughout the 1980s, Zimbabwe played a variety of opponents and enjoyed a decent amount of success, defeating opponents such as Spain and the Soviet Union; in the victory over the Soviet Union, history was made as Richard Tsimba became the first black player for Zimbabwe. In 1987, Zimbabwe was invited to partake in the inaugural 1987 Rugby World Cup to represent the African continent, instead of South Africa, who were under sanction due to apartheid; unfortunately, the Sables lost all 3 of their matches, although came on the verge of upsetting Romania (losing by 1 point), a game which featured a two try performance by Richard Tsimba. The following year in 1988, Zimbabwe became one of the charter members of Rugby Africa, alongside the Ivory Coast, Morocco and Tunisia.

In 1990, Zimbabwe participated in the first Rugby World Cup qualifying competition for the African continent. The team topped a group consisting of the Ivory Coast, Morocco, and Tunisia, qualifying for the 1991 Rugby World Cup. However, unfortunately for the Sables, they lost all their 3 matches to Ireland, Japan, and Scotland by fairly large margins. After this World many players from Zimbabwe's "Golden Generation" retired. Namibia and later Kenya entered the scene, challenging the original four charter members of Rugby Africa, and the slow deterioration of the Zimbabwean economy in the 1990s and into the 2000s caused many rugby players (both black and white) to leave the country for opportunities elsewhere.[citation needed] An example of this is Kennedy Tsimba, who initially played as a Zimbabwe international, but later switched to South Africa due to the political and economic situation.[6]

Zimbabwe finished last in the round robin for the 1995 Rugby World Cup, and finished third in the 1999 qualifying round robin.

2000s - Decline

The Sables began the decade in poor form, losing all four of their matches in the 2000 Africa Cup, against Namibia and a South African Amateur XV; the team narrowly improved in the following edition in 2001, being able to defeat Namibia once by the score of 27 to 26. In the penultimate 2002 edition, Zimbabwe played a close and tense game against Namibia in Harare, but ultimately lost 30 to 42, failing to qualify for the 2003 Rugby World Cup.

As the decade continued, Zimbabwe slowly faded from the African rugby scene; the 2004 campaign was disastrous, as Zimbabwe lost to Madagascar for the first time, and were later thrashed by Namibia. The 2007 Rugby World Cup qualifying campaign was also a disaster, with Zimbabwe losing to Zambia, an opponent they had traditionally dominated. By 2008, the Sables hit rock bottom, losing in the first round of the qualifying for the 2011 World Cup.

2010s - Revival

The 2010s began with hope for Zimbabwe. The Sables won the Africa Cup for the first time in 2010, beating Botswana and Madagascar. The following year, after a reform of the Africa Cup divisions, Zimbabwe were placed in Group 1B, alongside familiar foes the Ivory Coast and Madagascar and Uganda. Zimbabwe won the division, defeating both Madagascar and Uganda.

As with many other sports, over the years, numerous talented young Zimbabwean rugby players have emigrated to play for other nations, mainly South Africa but also Australia, Scotland and other European countries. This trend has continued with players being attracted abroad by better playing and coaching facilities, as well as being pushed by the ever-declining economic climate in their country of origin.

Notable players

Over the years, Zimbabwe have lost much of their rugby talent to other countries. The list of Zimbabwean players who have left to ply their trade elsewhere includes:


Former Saracens CEO, Bath Chairman & SA Rugby CEO (whilst triumphant in the 1995 World Cup), Edward Griffiths was born in Zimbabwe.

Other players of Zimbabwean origin include All Black centre Braydon Ennor, Springbok scrumhalf Ross Cronje and Japan winger Kotaro Matsushima

Many other Zimbabwe-born players are playing at top levels in New Zealand, South Africa, Wales, England, Scotland, Ireland and across Europe.

Record

Zimbabwe record against all nations, updated to 1 July 2022, is as follows:[7]

Nation Games Won Lost Drawn Win% For Aga Diff
 Arabian Gulf 1 1 0 0 100% 50 21 +29
 Argentina 1 1 0 0 100% 17 12 +5
 Belgium 1 0 1 0 0% 11 28 –17
 Botswana 3 3 0 0 100% 237 23 +214
 Brazil 1 1 0 0 100% 24 22 +2
 Burkina Faso 2 2 0 0 100% 196 8 +188
 France 1 0 1 0 0% 12 70 –58
 Georgia 3 1 2 0 33.33% 35 58 –23
 Hong Kong 3 0 3 0 0% 29 86 –57
 Ireland 1 0 1 0 0% 11 55 –44
 Italy 3 0 3 0 0% 25 70 –45
 Ivory Coast 5 3 2 0 60% 105 70 +35
 Japan 1 0 1 0 0% 8 52 +44
 Kenya 24 14 10 0 58.33% 620 571 +49
 Madagascar 11 9 2 0 81.82% 368 155 +213
 Mauritius 1 1 0 0 100% 14 6 +8
 Morocco 4 2 1 1 50% 69 47 +22
 Namibia 33 3 30 0 9.09% 675 1239 —564
 Netherlands 1 1 0 0 100% 30 7 +23
 Nigeria 1 1 0 0 100% 111 12 +99
 Papua New Guinea 1 1 0 0 100% 38 11 +27
 Portugal 4 2 2 0 50% 113 72 +41
 Romania 4 0 4 0 0% 84 123 –39
 Russia 3 0 3 0 0% 35 92 –57
 Scotland 2 0 2 0 0% 33 111 –78
 Senegal 2 2 0 0 100% 49 31 +18
 Soviet Union 4 2 2 0 50% 65 66 –1
 Spain 7 2 5 0 28.57% 108 153 –45
 Tonga 1 0 1 0 0% 13 42 –29
 Tunisia 6 4 2 0 66.67% 153 93 +60
 Uganda 15 10 5 0 66.67% 358 287 +71
 United Arab Emirates 1 1 0 0 100% 65 14 +51
 Wales 3 0 3 0 0% 38 126 –88
 Zambia 7 6 1 0 85.71% 260 51 +209
Total 161 73 87 1 44.65% 4059 3884 +175

World Cup Record

World Cup record World Cup Qualification record
Year Round P W D L F A P W D L F A
AustraliaNew Zealand 1987 Pool Stage 3 0 0 3 53 151 -
United KingdomRepublic of IrelandFrance 1991 Pool Stage 3 0 0 3 31 158 3 3 0 0 62 12
South Africa 1995 did not qualify 6 3 0 3 169 120
Wales 1999 5 2 0 3 125 102
Australia 2003 2 1 0 1 82 45
France 2007 4 2 0 2 55 84
New Zealand 2011 1 0 0 1 21 35
England 2015 6 3 0 3 170 126
Japan 2019 5 1 1 3 139 162
France 2023 5 3 0 2 265 73
Total 2/9 6 0 0 6 84 309 32 18 1 18 1088 759

Players

Current squad

On the 13th of June, the following 31 players were called up to face the Netherlands in a World Rugby test match as well as to participate in the 2023 Rugby World Cup Africa 1 qualifier tournament.[8]

Head Coach: Zimbabwe Brendon Dawson

Note: Flags indicate national union for the club/province as defined by World Rugby.

Player Position Date of birth (age) Caps Club/province
Liam Larkan Hooker (1995-11-28) 28 November 1995 (age 28) 0 Zimbabwe Zimbabwe Goshawks
Matthew Mandioma Hooker (1992-02-26) 26 February 1992 (age 31) 38 Zimbabwe Zimbabwe Goshawks
Royal Mwale Hooker (1988-10-17) 17 October 1988 (age 35) 23 Netherlands RC The Dukes
Tyran Fagan Prop (1992-04-25) 25 April 1992 (age 31) 10 Zimbabwe Zimbabwe Goshawks
Bornwell Gwinji Prop (1997-04-15) 15 April 1997 (age 26) 5 Zimbabwe Zimbabwe Goshawks
Cleopas Kundiona Prop (1998-12-15) 15 December 1998 (age 25) 6 France Nevers
Victor Mapunga Prop (1999-08-28) 28 August 1999 (age 24) 1 Zimbabwe Zimbabwe Goshawks
Gabriel Sipapate Prop (1995-01-15) 15 January 1995 (age 29) 1 Zimbabwe Zimbabwe Goshawks
Sean Beevor Lock (1995-06-29) 29 June 1995 (age 28) 6 Zimbabwe Zimbabwe Goshawks
Johan Du Preez Lock (1996-08-29) 29 August 1996 (age 27) 0 Zimbabwe Zimbabwe Goshawks
Godwin Mangenje Lock (1996-12-30) 30 December 1996 (age 27) 6 Zimbabwe Zimbabwe Goshawks
Godfrey Muzanargwo Lock (1998-11-13) 13 November 1998 (age 25) 10 Zimbabwe Zimbabwe Goshawks
Aiden Burnett Back row (1997-08-06) 6 August 1997 (age 26) 6 Zimbabwe Zimbabwe Goshawks
Jason Fraser Back row (1991-04-15) 15 April 1991 (age 32) 0 France Nevers
Kelvin Kanenungo Back row (1999-06-30) 30 June 1999 (age 24) 0 Zimbabwe Zimbabwe Goshawks
Nyasha Tarusenga Back row (1996-03-29) 29 March 1996 (age 27) 0 Zimbabwe Zimbabwe Goshawks
Biselele Tshamala Back row (1990-11-26) 26 November 1990 (age 33) 31 Zimbabwe Zimbabwe Goshawks
Tapiwa Tsomondo Back row (1993-05-05) 5 May 1993 (age 30) 1 France RC Amienois
Kyle Galloway Scrum-half (2000-10-29) 29 October 2000 (age 23) 0 Zimbabwe Zimbabwe Goshawks
Hilton Mudariki Scrum-half (1992-04-08) 8 April 1992 (age 31) 26 Zimbabwe Zimbabwe Goshawks
Brendon Marume Fly-half (2000-11-28) 28 November 2000 (age 23) 0 Zimbabwe Zimbabwe Goshawks
Riaan O'Neill Fly-half (1994-05-24) 24 May 1994 (age 29) 15 Zimbabwe Zimbabwe Goshawks
Ngoni Chibuwe Centre (1994-10-17) 17 October 1994 (age 29) 4 Romania Steaua București
Takudzwa Chieza Centre (1993-05-16) 16 May 1993 (age 30) 7 Zimbabwe Zimbabwe Goshawks
Shingirai Katsvere Centre (1997-05-10) 10 May 1997 (age 26) 11 Zimbabwe Zimbabwe Goshawks
Matthew McNab Centre (1998-06-08) 8 June 1998 (age 25) 5 Zimbabwe Zimbabwe Goshawks
Shayne Makombe Wing (1991-11-21) 21 November 1991 (age 32) 2 Zimbabwe Zimbabwe Goshawks
Martin Mangongo Wing (1996-06-09) 9 June 1996 (age 27) 7 Poland Skra Warsaw
Takudzwa Musingwini Wing (1987-03-17) 17 March 1987 (age 36) 6 Zimbabwe Zimbabwe Goshawks
Marcus Nel Wing (1992-08-15) 15 August 1992 (age 31) 0 Zimbabwe Zimbabwe Goshawks
Tapiwa Mafura Fullback (1996-04-11) 11 April 1996 (age 27) 2 South Africa Pumas

Zimbabwe Goshawks

The following players were included in the Zimbabwe Goshawks squad for the 2023 Currie Cup First Division:[9]

Zimbabwe Goshawks

Props

  • Zvikomborero Chimoto
  • Bornwell Gwinji
  • Patrick Macklin
  • Brian Makamure
  • Tomuvonga Msasanure
  • Tawanda Mudyiwa
  • Kevin Nqidi
  • Scotty Patson

Hookers

  • Liam Larkan
  • Neil Mawere
  • Vuyiswa Mpofu

Locks

  • Innocent Chimcheka
  • Tadiwa Gwashu
  • Dave Makamba


Loose forwards

  • Aiden Burnett
  • Tonderai Chiwambutsa
  • Aaron Juma
  • Kelvin Kanenungo
  • Gideon Maseka
  • Simbarashe Siraha

Scrum-halves

Fly-halves

  • Tino Chipfumbu
  • Jerry Jaravaza
  • Takudzwa Musingwini
  • Benji Pattenden


Centres

  • Russell Dinha
  • Leon Misichilli
  • MacLean Muhambi
  • Tamuka Pamire
  • Boyd Rouse

Wingers

  • Darrel Makwasha
  • Calvin Mukoyi
  • Kenneth Murefu
  • Gamu Nekato

Fullbacks

  • Brendon Marume
  • Martin Mangongo
  • Cleytos Sunduza
(c) Denotes team captain and Bold denotes internationally capped.

Past Coaches

Since the 1987

Years Coach
1987 Zimbabwe Brian Murphy
1988–1989 Saint Kitts Colin Osborne
1990–1992 Zimbabwe Ian Buchanan
1992–1996 Saint Kitts Colin Osborne
1997–1998 South Africa John Knox
1998 Zimbabwe Alex Nicholls (Interim)
1999–2001 Australia Mark Donato
2001–2003 Zimbabwe Godwin Murambiwa
2003 Zimbabwe Alex Nicholls (Interim)
2004 Zimbabwe Bright Chivandire
2005–2006 Zimbabwe Chris Lampard
2007–2010 Zimbabwe Brendon Dawson
2011 Zimbabwe Cyprian Mandongle (Caretaker)
2012–2014 Zimbabwe Brendon Dawson
2015–2017 Zimbabwe Cyprian Mandongle
2018–2019 South Africa Peter de Villiers
2019–present Zimbabwe Brendon Dawson

See also

References

Notes

  1. ^ "Zim Rugby -About ZRU". Archived from the original on 28 September 2007. Retrieved 15 August 2007.
  2. ^ "The Day Rhodesia Beat the All Blacks". rugby-talk.com. 25 April 2012. Retrieved 10 June 2018.
  3. ^ "Zim Rugby -About ZRU". Archived from the original on 28 September 2007. Retrieved 15 August 2007.
  4. ^ "Zim Rugby -About ZRU". Archived from the original on 28 September 2007. Retrieved 15 August 2007.
  5. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 12 June 2018. Retrieved 8 January 2014.((cite web)): CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  6. ^ Allie, Mohammed (18 March 2002). "The king of Bloemfontein". BBC Sport. Retrieved 11 June 2018.
  7. ^ "Rugbydata.com - International Rugby Union Statistics - Statistics for Zimbabwe - Teams Played". Archived from the original on 21 November 2008. Retrieved 23 October 2007.
  8. ^ Weak Sables squad named ahead of World Cup qualifiers
  9. ^ "Zimbabwe Goshawks". SA Rugby. Retrieved 28 March 2022.

Sources