1962 Wisconsin Badgers football
Rose Bowl, L 42–37 vs. USC
ConferenceBig Ten Conference
Ranking
CoachesNo. 2 [1]
APNo. 2 [2]
Record8–2 (6–1 Big Ten)
Head coach
MVPRon Vander Kelen
CaptainPat Richter
Steve Underwood
Home stadiumCamp Randall Stadium
Seasons
← 1961
1963 →
1962 Big Ten Conference football standings
Conf Overall
Team W   L   T W   L   T
No. 2 Wisconsin $ 6 1 0 8 2 0
No. 10 Minnesota 5 2 0 6 2 1
Northwestern 4 2 0 7 2 0
Ohio State 4 2 0 6 3 0
Michigan State 3 3 0 5 4 0
Purdue 3 3 0 4 4 1
Iowa 3 3 0 4 5 0
Illinois 2 5 0 2 7 0
Indiana 1 5 0 3 6 0
Michigan 1 6 0 2 7 0
  • $ – Conference champion
Rankings from AP Poll

The 1962 Wisconsin Badgers football team represented the University of Wisconsin in the 1962 NCAA University Division football season. Wisconsin was the Big Ten Conference champion and was ranked second in both final major polls, released in early December. This remains the highest season-ending ranking in program history (since the polls' inception in 1936 (AP) and 1950 (coaches)).

Wisconsin met the #1 USC Trojans in the historic Rose Bowl,[3][4] the first bowl game in college football history to pair the top two ranked teams in the nation. This Wisconsin team is also tightly linked to the resurgence of the program in the 1990s through All-American end Pat Richter, who returned as athletic director in 1989 and hired head coach Barry Alvarez.

Season

Wisconsin opened the season by crushing New Mexico State and then subdued Indiana 30–6. On October 13, they defeated Notre Dame 17–8, which gave them a number 10 ranking. The Badgers then defeated the Iowa 42–15, which moved them up to fifth. A 14–7 loss to Ohio State the following week dropped Wisconsin out of the polls (top ten only).

On November 3, the Badgers defeated struggling Michigan on the road, 34–12. This set up following week's homecoming game versus #1 Northwestern at Camp Randall Stadium. Eighth-ranked Wisconsin soundly defeated Northwestern 37–6, and moved up to fourth in the next poll. A win at Illinois set up a #3 Wisconsin vs #5 Minnesota battle for Paul Bunyan's Axe. Wisconsin won 14–9, securing the Big Ten title and the berth in the Rose Bowl, as well as a season-ending #2 ranking.

The Badgers faced #1 USC in the historic Rose Bowl; the first bowl game in college football history between the top two teams in the polls, and the final rankings were already set. At the time, the two major polls (AP, UPI) released their final editions prior to the bowl games, so Wisconsin's runner-up rank went unchanged after the bowl loss. However, the game was still a de facto national championship game as the winner would receive the Grantland Rice Trophy.[5][6]

Quarterback Ron Vander Kelen seemingly "come from nowhere" to lead the Badgers to a conference championship; he had missed the 1960 season due to an injury, and was declared academically ineligible for 1961. He was named the Big Ten Conference MVP for 1962 in his only season of play (except for late-game mop-up in 1959 versus Marquette).[7]

Senior end Pat Richter was a unanimous consensus All-America selection and came in sixth in the Heisman Trophy voting for 1962. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1996. Despite his an accomplishments as a player, he may be better known to younger generations for hiring coach Barry Alvarez when he became the athletic director at Wisconsin decades later. Junior center Ken Bowman played ten seasons with the Green Bay Packers, winning three consecutive NFL titles under head coach Vince Lombardi.

Schedule and results

DateOpponentRankSiteResultAttendanceSource
September 29New Mexico State*W 69–1340,495
October 6Indiana
  • Camp Randall Stadium
  • Madison, WI
W 30–641,354
October 13Notre Dame*
  • Camp Randall Stadium
  • Madison, WI
W 17–861,098
October 20IowaNo. 10
  • Camp Randall Stadium
  • Madison, WI (rivalry)
W 42–1460,297
October 27at Ohio StateNo. 5L 7–1482,540
November 3at MichiganW 34–1253,789[8]
November 10No. 1 NorthwesterndaggerNo. 8
  • Camp Randall Stadium
  • Madison, WI
W 37–665,501
November 17at IllinoisNo. 4W 35–636,762
November 24No. 5 MinnesotaNo. 3
W 14–965,514
January 1, 1963vs. No. 1 USC*No. 2L 37–4298,698
  • *Non-conference game
  • daggerHomecoming
  • Rankings from AP Poll released prior to the game

Roster

Game summaries

at Ohio State

1 234Total
No. 5 Badgers 0 700 7
Buckeyes 7 007 14
  • Date: October 27, 1962
  • Location: Ohio Stadium
    Columbus, Ohio
  • Game attendance: 82,540
  • Game weather: Cloudy, wind SSW 15 mph, 44 °F (7 °C)

See also: 1962 Ohio State Buckeyes football team

No. 5 Minnesota

No. 5 Minnesota at No. 3 Wisconsin
1 234Total
No. 5 Golden Gophers 0 630 9
No. 3 Badgers 0 707 14

See also: 1962 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team

[9][10]

Rankings

Main article: 1962 NCAA University Division football rankings

Team players in the 1963 NFL Draft

Player Position Round Pick NFL club
Pat Richter End 1 7 Washington Redskins
Gary Kroner Back 7 93 Green Bay Packers

[11]

References

  1. ^ "Year-by-year Final Coaches' Polls". American Football Coaches Association. Archived from the original on January 2, 2011. Retrieved January 14, 2010.
  2. ^ "Poll Archive". Associated Press. Archived from the original on May 25, 2010. Retrieved January 14, 2010.
  3. ^ Bochat, Rel (January 1, 1963). "This is it! Badgers, USC in big one". Milwaukee Sentinel. p. 9, part 2. Archived from the original on January 27, 2020. Retrieved August 3, 2018.
  4. ^ Zimmermann, Paul (January 1, 1963). "Badgers bent on bowl vengeance; Wisconsin winless in two classics". Spokesman-Review. (Spokane, Washington). (Los Angeles Times). p. 12.
  5. ^ Los Angeles Times "The national championship was at stake – USC was ranked No. 1 and Wisconsin No. 2"
  6. ^ Jenkins, Dan (September 11, 1967). "THIS YEAR THE FIGHT WILL BE IN THE OPEN". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved January 23, 2024.
  7. ^ John Underwoord (September 9, 2010). "Vander Kelen". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved July 4, 2011.
  8. ^ Joe Falls (November 4, 1962). "U-M Scores, but -- Badgers Win, 34-12". Detroit Free Press. p. 1F – via Newspapers.com.
  9. ^ "Wisconsin Halts Minnesota, 14-9". The New York Times. November 25, 1962. Retrieved September 4, 2023.
  10. ^ "Two Goofs Kill the Gophers". Sports Illustrated. December 3, 1962. Retrieved September 12, 2023. ((cite magazine)): Cite magazine requires |magazine= (help)
  11. ^ "1963 NFL Draft Listing - Pro-Football-Reference.com". Archived from the original on December 23, 2007.