2016 Moroccan general election
Morocco
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All 395 seats in the House of Representatives
198 seats needed for a majority
Party Leader % Seats +/–
PJD Abdelilah Benkirane 27.88 125 +18
PAM Ilyas El Omari 20.95 102 +55
Istiqlal Hamid Chabat 10.68 46 −14
RNI Salaheddine Mezouar 9.32 37 −15
MP Mohand Laenser 6.84 27 −5
USFP Driss Lachgar 6.19 20 −19
PPS Nabil Benabdallah 4.72 12 −6
UC Mohammed Abied 4.52 19 −4
FGD 2.83 2 New
MDS 1.34 3 +1
PUD 0.41 1 0
PVG 0.41 1 0
This lists parties that won seats. See the complete results below.
Prime Minister before Prime Minister after
Abdelillah Benkirane
PJD
Saadeddine Othmani
PJD

General elections were held in Morocco on 7 October 2016.[1] The ruling Justice and Development Party remained the largest party, winning 125 of the 395 seats in the House of Representatives, a gain of 18 seats compared to the 2011 elections.

Saadeddine Othmani was appointed as Prime Minister by King Mohammed VI and formed his cabinet on 5 April 2017, including the PJD, the National Rally of Independents (RNI), the Popular Movement (MP), the Constitutional Union (UC), the Party of Progress and Socialism (PPS) and the Socialist Union of Popular Forces (USFP).

Background

The elections were announced by the Moroccan government in late January 2016.[2] They were the second elections after the constitutional reforms introduced in 2011 by King Mohammed VI in response to the Arab Spring.[2] Despite the reforms, most executive powers still lie with the king.[3][4]

The 2011 elections were won by the Justice and Development Party (PJD), which has led the government since then. The party is described as "moderate Islamist", but its government coalition included parties with differing ideologies.[5][failed verification]

The incumbent Prime Minister going into the 2016 elections was Abdelilah Benkirane.[2] The largest opposition party was the pro-monarchy Party of Authenticity and Modernity (PAM).[6][7] PJD and PAM ran an "unusually hostile" campaign.[3] The largest Islamist opposition group, Justice and Spirituality, as well as several left-wing organizations boycotted the election, protesting the monarchy's still considerable executive powers.[4][3]

Electoral system

The 395 seats in the House of Representatives are elected by proportional representation in two tiers: 305 seats are elected from 92 multi-member constituencies, with the electoral threshold set at 6%, and the remaining 90 seats are elected from a single nationwide constituency with the electoral threshold set at 3%. The nationwide seats are reserved, with 60 for women and 30 for people under the age of 40.[8]

Under the electoral system no party can win a majority in the parliament, and parties must form a coalition government.[4]

Results

The vote had 43% turnout.[3][9] The Justice and Development Party won the most votes and 125 out of the 395 seats. The Authenticity and Modernity Party won 102 seats, and the rest of the seats were split among smaller parties.

Party Constituency Nationwide Total
seats
+/–
Votes % Seats Votes % Seats
Women Youth
Justice and Development Party 1,571,659 27.14 98 1,618,963 27.88 18 9 125 +18
Authenticity and Modernity Party 1,205,444 20.82 81 1,216,552 20.95 14 7 102 +55
Istiqlal Party 621,280 10.73 35 620,041 10.68 7 4 46 –14
National Rally of Independents 558,875 9.65 28 544,118 9.37 6 3 37 –15
Popular Movement 409,085 7.06 20 397,085 6.84 5 2 27 –5
Socialist Union of Popular Forces 367,622 6.35 14 359,600 6.19 4 2 20 –19
Party of Progress and Socialism 279,226 4.82 7 273,800 4.72 3 2 12 –6
Constitutional Union 268,813 4.64 15 263,720 4.54 3 1 19 –4
Federation of the Democratic Left 139,793 2.41 2 164,575 2.83 0 0 2 New
Democratic and Social Movement 74,472 1.29 3 77,630 1.34 0 0 3 +1
Covenant and Restoration Alliance 49,040 0.85 0 51,906 0.89 0 0 0 New
Front of Democratic Forces 51,945 0.90 0 49,360 0.85 0 0 0 –1
Environment and Sustainable Development Party 35,645 0.62 0 35,167 0.61 0 0 0 –2
Unity and Democracy Party 20,240 0.35 1 23,574 0.41 0 0 1 0
New Democratic Party 17,003 0.29 0 19,284 0.33 0 0 0 New
Party of Renaissance and Virtue 15,522 0.27 0 14,955 0.26 0 0 0 0
Party of Liberty and Social Justice 10,811 0.19 0 14,735 0.25 0 0 0 –1
Democratic Independence Party 13,097 0.23 0 13,418 0.23 0 0 0 0
Renaissance Party 11,194 0.19 0 12,710 0.22 0 0 0 New
Party of Hope 7,747 0.13 0 9,117 0.16 0 0 0 0
Labour Party 2,910 0.05 0 7,228 0.12 0 0 0 –4
Social Centre Party 6,156 0.11 0 6,977 0.12 0 0 0 0
Moroccan Union for Democracy 5,266 0.09 0 6,379 0.11 0 0 0 0
Democratic Society Party 3,046 0.05 0 5,110 0.09 0 0 0 0
Reform and Development Party 16,501 0.28 0 0 0
Green Left Party 13,389 0.23 1 1 0
National Democratic Party 5,115 0.09 0 0 0
Independents 9,656 0.17 0 0 0
Invalid/blank votes
Total 5,790,552 100 305 5,806,004 100 60 30 395 0
Registered voters/turnout 15,702,592 15,702,592
Source: CEC (Votes) Le Matin (Total seats, Women's seats)

Reactions

Morocco's election observer body said that the voting was largely free and fair. It reported some cases of vote-buying, but said that they were rare and sporadic. It also expressed concern about the relatively low (43%) turnout.[3] Critics also alleged that the royal establishment used its influence to favour the pro-monarchy PAM.[4]

Aftermath

Following the elections, Khalid Adnoun, a spokesman for the second-placed Authenticity and Modernity Party (PAM) ruled out joining a coalition government, forcing the PJD to partner with multiple smaller parties in order to secure a majority.[4] On 10 October, Abdelillah Benkirane was reappointed Prime Minister by King Mohammed VI in accordance with the 2011 constitutional reforms which required the king to appoint a prime minister from the party receiving the most votes.[10] However, plans to form a second coalition government led to a political deadlock due to Benkirane objecting to proposals by Aziz Akhannouch, then-cabinet minister and newly-elected leader of the National Rally of Independents (RNI), and Mohand Laenser of the Popular Movement (MP), calling for the Constitutional Union (UC) and the Socialist Union of Popular Forces (USFP) to be included in the coalition.[11][12]

On 17 March 2017, Saadeddine Othmani was appointed as Prime Minister by King Mohammed VI.[13] On 25 March 2017 Othmani announced that he would be forming a coalition consisting of the PJD, RNI, MP, UC, USFP, and the Party of Progress and Socialism (PPS).[14] The members of the cabinet were announced by the King on 5 April, with some key portfolios going to technocrats.[15]

References

  1. ^ Morocco The World Factbook
  2. ^ a b c Morocco to hold parliamentary elections on Oct. 7 -government Reuters, 28 January 2016
  3. ^ a b c d e Observers: Moroccan election overall fair, but turnout low Archived 2017-03-01 at the Wayback Machine Associated Press, 9 October 2016
  4. ^ a b c d e Moderate Moroccan Islamists win election, coalition talks seen tough Reuters, 8 October 2016
  5. ^ Moroccan Islamist Party Wins New Mandate in Elections Wall Street Journal, 8 October 2016
  6. ^ The report: Morocco 2009, Oxford Business Group, p19
  7. ^ Michael J. Willis (2012) Politics and Power in the Maghreb: Algeria, Tunisia and Morocco from Independence to the Arab Spring, C. Hurst & Co, pp149–150
  8. ^ Electoral system Inter-Parliamentary Union
  9. ^ Parliamentary Elections 2016 Maroc.ma, 7 October 2016
  10. ^ Moroccan king reappoints Abdelilah Bekirane as PM Al Jazeera, 10 October 2016
  11. ^ "Nouveau blocage pour la formation du gouvernement marocain". Le Monde (in French). 9 January 2017. Retrieved 17 June 2022.
  12. ^ "Un mois et demi après les élections, le Maroc toujours sans gouvernement". Middle East Eye (in French). 20 November 2016. Retrieved 17 June 2022.
  13. ^ King of Morocco names Saad Eddine El Othmani as new prime minister
  14. ^ Saad Eddine Othmani Announces end of Deadlock, Formation of Government Morocco World News, 25 March 2017
  15. ^ Maroc : le roi nomme un gouvernement de technocrates qui marginalise les islamistes Le Monde, 5 April 2017