Australia at the
2004 Summer Paralympics
Flag of Australia.svg
IPC codeAUS
NPCAustralian Paralympic Committee
Websitewww.paralympic.org.au
in Athens
Competitors151
Flag bearerLouise Sauvage (Opening) Matthew Cowdrey (Closing)
Medals
Ranked 5th
Gold
26
Silver
39
Bronze
36
Total
101
Summer Paralympics appearances (overview)

Australia competed at the 2004 Summer Paralympics in Athens, Greece. It was Australia's 12th year of participation at the Paralympics. The team included 151 athletes (91 men and 60 women).[1] Australian competitors won 101 medals (26 gold, 39 silver and 36 bronze) to finish fifth in the gold medal table and second on the total medal table.[2] Australia competed in 12 sports and won medals in 8 sports. The Chef de Mission was Paul Bird.[3] The Australian team was smaller than the Sydney Games due to a strict selection policy related to the athletes' potential to win a medal[4] and the International Paralympic Committee's decision to remove events for athletes with an intellectual disability from the Games due to issues of cheating at the Sydney Games. This was due to a cheating scandal with the Spanish intellectually disabled basketball team in the 2000 Summer Paralympics where it was later discovered that only two players actually had intellectual disabilities.[5] The IPC decision resulted in leading Australian athletes such as Siobhan Paton and Lisa Llorens not being able to defend their Paralympic titles. The 2000 summer paralympic games hosted in Sydney Australia proved to be a milestone for the Australian team as they finished first on the medal tally for the first time in history.In comparing Australia's 2000 Paralympic performance and their 2004 performance, it is suggested that having a home advantage might affect performance.

Outstanding performers

Some of the other outstanding Australian athletes included:

Background of the Athens Games

Further information: 2004 Summer Paralympics

The 2004 Summer Paralympics, formally known as Games of the XXVIII Olympiad, was held from September 17 to September 28. The twelfth Paralympic Games, a total of 3,808 competitors (2,643 Men and 1,165 Women) from 135 countries participated. During these games 304 World Records were broken with 448 Paralympic Games Records being broken across 19 different sports. Addition of judo and sitting volleyball for women and football 5-a-side for men were included. The ticket sale for event saw a decrease in tickets sold, with about 850.000 tickets for the different competitions compared to 1.2 million sold at the 2000 Sydney games.[15] The event was made possible through the help of 8,863 volunteers[16] [17]

Opening and Closing Ceremony

From the Paralympics opening ceremony
From the Paralympics opening ceremony

Louise Sauvage, a nine-time Paralympic gold medalist, lit the cauldron during the opening ceremonies for the 2000 Summer Paralympics in Sydney. On September 17, 2004, Sauvage carried the Australian flag into the opening ceremony stadium, "Spyridon Louis", at what was her 4th Paralympic games. She has a Sydney ferry, a street and a pathway named after her, as well as numerous school sport houses around Australia.[18] After the parade of nations, the Games were declared opened by IPC President Sir Philip Craven and Greek president Cistis Stephanopoulos, before the Paralympic flame was lit by Georgios Toptsis. The opening ceremony was seen by 72,000 spectators in the stadium[19]

Swimmer Matthew Cowdrey, recognized for his achievements during the games, was chosen to carry the Australia flag at the Closing Ceremony of the Games. The closing ceremony during the 2004 games was cut short and only entailed the protocol segments required to complete the Games, due to a tragic accident involving the deaths of seven high school students on their way to the Games. One minute of silence in tribute to the school students were held as the Paralympic flag flew half-mast. Australian gold medalist, Katrina Webb, who were critical of the Paralympic Organizers who removed the party element of the closing ceremony and thus leaving only the athletes' entry, the Paralympic President Phil Craven's speech and the handover of the flag to Beijing, said "Things like this happen, you can't stop everything. Life goes on. We should make sure we pay our respects in that regard but things should continue as they were."[20][21]

The closing ceremony ended with the unveiling of the IPC's new logo[22]

Factors affecting Australia’s performance

In 2000, Australia hosted both the Olympic and the Paralympic games with the Australian team's performance, more speciafically the summer Paralympic team, being remarkable. For the first time in history, Australia placed first on the total medal tally for the summer Paralympics, with a total of 314 medals.[23] This result was studied in the relation to the possibility of athletes having a home advantage, measured using a 'market share', which is measured by dividing the number of total medals won (with gold being 3 points, silver equating to 2 points and bronze being 1 point) by the total number of medals contested at the Paralympic games.[23] In the 2000 games, the Australian team presented a home market share of 9.50%. At the 1996 US Paralympic games prior, Australia's market share was 7.27% and in the 2004 Athens Paralympics, it was 6.15%. It is proposed that there was only a home advantage for a few sports which included athletics, table tennis and wheelchair fencing.[24] An investigation into whether there is a correlation between being communist country and sporting performance verses being a capitalist country and sporting performance[25] was also launched. It has been argued that in communist regimes, a higher amount of resources is allocated to the sports as “communist countries use success in top-level sports to display the benefits of their political system” as well as exhibiting their “internal political stability” [25]

It should also be noted that there are multiple socioeconomic determinants that contribute to a country’s performance at the summer Paralympics. Inevitably, success of a country is randomly distributed at the Paralympics .[25] An investigation into these contributing factors has been launched. “While some countries dominate a particular sport discipline, other countries have elite athletes in various sports, or have little or no success in sports at all”.[25] It has been proposed that countries that are more economically prosperous than others and have subsequently higher success rates across all sports.[25] These countries are able to invest more resources into top-level sports as well as investing more effort into ensuring they have a healthy population to enable maximum sporting performance. Research has also been conducted on communist countries as it has been proposed that these nations utilise their success in top-level sports to exhibit the benefits of their political system.[25] Expenditure on health and population size both also have a positive correlation on a country’s sporting performance. “This reflects a basic law of large numbers in the sense that larger populations will…have more talented athletes”.[25] Carrying on, the degree to which a nation supports the integration of a disabled person into the sporting world, is also positively correlated to the nation’s success at the Paralympics. The more accommodating and understanding a country is in relation to ensuring disabled individuals have equal access to facilities and services, the increased feelings of inclusive and thus desire to represent their country in sport. Thus, the size of the countries Paralympic team reflects how much political priority is given to support their disabled athletes.

Another factor that affected Australia’s performance was the introduction of technological advances that assisted Paralympic athletes in their performance. Prosthetic and wheelchair technology are necessities for citizens with disabilities to conduct their day to day activities.[26] However, application of certain technology into the sporting world can prove controversial and be unfair. It has been conducted through research that in the 2008 Beijing games, some track and field athletes in both the Paralympic and Olympic games wore clothing with a specific type of material that provided an unfair advantage. The clothing was manufactured by Nike and contained threads of vectran fibre which was found to “reduce drag by 7% when compared with the 2004 outfits”.[27] Thus, it can be argued that some technological advancements that were utilised in the 2004 Paralympic games provided an unfair advantage amongst other participants including Australian parathletes.

Australia’s past performance

As hosts of the 2000 Olympic and the Paralympic games, the Australian population had high expectations for the Australian athletes in these games. Notably, this was the first Paralympic games ever to be hosted in the Southern hemisphere. Overall, the 2000 Paralympic games attracted 3,879 para athletes, 285 being Australian para athletes.[28] This was 120 more para athletes than the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic team and 134 more than 2004 Athens Paralympic team. The Paralympic games saw 122 nations compete across 18 sports.[28] In total, the Australian team comprised 30 intellectually disabled athletes, which at the time, was the largest number the team had ever had. Overall, there were 20 multiple gold medallists in the team.[29] One notable athlete is Siobhan Paton, a Paralympic swimmer with an intellectual disability, who won the most gold medals than any other Australian in the 2000 games, coming away with 6 in total.[30] However, in the 2004 games she was unable to uphold these titles due to the temporary banning of intellectually disabled athletes [31]

Development and preparation

The 2004 Olympics and Paralympics was the largest event Athens had ever hosted and thus, it was paramount that the games ran safely and timely. This required thorough planning to ensure the games operated smoothly and problem free. Large consideration for how the large number of participants, coaches, visitors, workers, volunteers were all going to gather in a relatively small geographic area was needed as ensuring their safety was of number one priority.[24] The Olympic Planning Unit (OPU) played a crucial part in the planning of these games as they decided what was lacking and therefor needed of local public health agencies, identified possible health risks that could be exposed to the public and worked collaboratively with other government agencies.[32] Inevitably, international travel is associated with public health risks such as increased accidents and increased overall morbidity. The Greek government accounted for the possibility of new diseases that were previously not endemic to the city of Athens being imported due to the increase in tourists and travellers.[24] As a precaution, the Greek health authorities sorted possible diseases into non-infectious and infectious disease and then categorised in terms of their probability of occurring as their high or low priority.

With 7,000 people expected to attend these Paralympic games, it was recognised that delivery of food was of large concern and importance. The Organising committee for the Olympic games established that there was to be 3 main restaurants situated within the Olympic village for participants. Overall, 250 chefs and 250 assistants were employed to ensure the smooth preparation of around 50,000 expected daily meals to fed the village residents.[24] Continuing on, multiple catering companies and outdoor vendors were hired to offer meals around the various Paralympic venues.

Another concern that was raised in the preparation of the games, was the high possibility of the transmission of airborne viruses particularly within indoor venues.[24] More specifically, influenza was of main concern as a considerable portion of athletes and visitors were arriving from the southern hemisphere, including Australians, where it is highly prevalent.[32] An evaluation of non-infectious illnesses such as heat illness was assessed. This was regarded as high importance as heat was a major issue in the 1996 Atlanta games which saw high levels of humidity and temperatures.[32] The elected venues for the games such as the hotels, swimming pools and toilets underwent inspections 2 years prior to the commencement of the games and from there, were checked on a regular basis up until September 2004 when the Paralympic games closed [24] However, upon post-event analysis of the games, it was proposed that the relatively low number of visitors may partly be due to the international political position.[33] Overall, the extensive planning conducted prior and during the games proved paramount for the access of both the Olympic and Paralympic games.

Counter terrorism efforts were also made as attention to this was catalysed from the 1996 Atlanta games. 111 people were injured from an exploding bomb during these games.[32]

Sport-specific criteria

During the 2000 summer Paralympic games, a cheating scandal took place with the Spanish basketball team.[34] Gold medals were awarded to 10 members of the team which was revoked later in the same year when it was uncovered that 10 out of the 12 members on the team had intellectual disabilities. This scandal lead to the implementation of a more thorough and objective criteria that Paralympic athletes must meet prior to their participation in the games.[31] Working cooperatively, the International Sports Federation for Para-athletes with an Intellectual Disability (INAS-ID) and the International Paralympic committee (IPC) established a rigid criterion for selection to combat future cheating and scandals. The first process that athletes must go through is ensuring all competitors claiming to have an impairment of their intellectual functioning, must fit the primary eligibility criteria set out by the American Association on Intellectual and developmental disability’s (AAIDD) definition of having an intellectual disability. According to the AAIDD, they propose that "Intellectual disability is a disability characterized by significant limitation both in intellectual functioning and in adaptive behaviour as expressed in conceptual, social, and practical adaptive skills…this disability originates before the age of 18".[34] Continuing on, it has been established that receiving an IQ below 75, indicates significant impairment in intellectual functioning.[31] Athletes must also exhibit performance that is at a minimum of 2 standard deviations below the mean on a measure that has been standardised within one or more of the 3 categories of adaptive behaviours; practical, conceptual or practical skills.[31] This new criteria for the selection of the athletes was not implemented in time for the 2004 games, meaning certain athletes were unable to defend their Olympic title such as Australian swimmer Siobhan Paton and Track athlete Lisa Llorens.[34]

In the 2000 Summer Sydney Paralympic games, Siobhan Paton acquired a total of 6 gold medals and set 9 world records whilst doing so. She was also named “Paralympian of the Year” by the Australian Paralympic Committee.[31] In 2004, she also competed in the INAS-FID (International Sports federation for people with an intellectual disability) world championships where she won a total of 14 gold medals and 3 silver medals. She also completed in the Global games later on in the same year where, unsurprisingly, won 3 gold medals, two silver and 2 bronze.[34] Track athlete Lisa Llorens specialised in high jumping, long jumping and sprinting. In the 2000 Summer Sydney Paralympic games, she won 3 gold medals, in. the 200 metre sprint, high jump and long jump whilst also receiving a silver medal in the 100 metre sprint.[34] Astonishingly, she also broke the long jump world record 3 times. She was also granted the opportunities to carry the Paralympic torch into the Stadium for the 2000 Sydney games, to which she did so with great pride

These Paralympic athletes were unable to defend their titles due to the International Paralympic committee’s decision to eliminate events for athletes with intellectual disabilities.[35] Unfortunately, this IPC decision caused Paton to fall into depression as she felt she didn’t not meet the disability requirements anymore. It wasn’t until after the 2008 Paralympic games, that a specific and rigorous criterion had been created, and thus the ban had been lifted for intellectually disabled athletes'.[36]

Media coverage

The 2000 Summer Paralympics in Sydney had the most comprehensive media coverage; and highest TV ratings ever experienced by a Paralympic Games for its time laying down the solid foundations for media surround the 2004 Summer Paralympics in Australia. The Athens Paralympics saw record media attendance with a total of 3,103 media representatives, including more than 66 broadcasters. The Paralympics were shown in 49 countries in addition to being broadcast worldwide via Eurosport and Reuters. A study of the broadcast coverage revealed approximately 1.86 billion viewers in total, distributed on 617 hours of coverage.[37] The increase in media attendance is thought be attributed to the introduction of 5-a-side Football.[38] The development in media attendance and coverage confirms that the media's interest in the Paralympis Games Since the Sydney 2000 Paralympics has grown.

Medal tally

Further information: 2004 Summer Paralympics medal table

There were 518 Medal events at the games. Australia brought home 101 medals, including a record 26 gold medals. The 2004 Paralympic Games in Athens were a precursor to the 2008 Summer Paralympics in Beijing. China dominated the medal count with more goal medals, more silver medals and more medals overall than any other nation. Australia had the second highest medal tally overall, which were 16% higher than it was in 1984.[39]

Rank Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 China 63 46 32 141
2 Great Britain 35 30 29 94
3 Canada 28 19 25 72
4 United States 27 22 39 88
5 Australia 26 39 36 101

Medalists

[40]

Events

Archery

See also: Archery at the 2004 Summer Paralympics

Officials - Vicki O'Brien (Manager)[3][40]

Athlete Event Ranking round Round of 32 Round of 16 Quarterfinals Semifinals Finals
Score Seed Opposition
score
Opposition
score
Opposition
score
Opposition
score
Opposition
score
Rank
Natalie Cordowiner Women's individual standing 505 15 N/A  Wang (CHN)
L 126-136
Did not advance

Athletics

See also: Athletics at the 2004 Summer Paralympics

After the highly successful 2000 Summer Paralympic games where Australia finished the number one country in athletics,[41] the goal for the 2004 Games were to finish aa a top three nation. After the dust had settled, Australia was number two on the athletics medal table and completed their best away Games ever.[39]

Men's track

Athlete Class Event Heats Semifinal Final
Result Rank Result Rank Result Rank
Kieran Ault T37 100m 12.66 7 q N/A 12.75 7
Malcolm Bennett T36 400m 1:02.69 8 q N/A 1:02.95 8
800m DNS Did not advance
1500m N/A 5:04.71 5
Paul Benz T38 100m 12.16 7 q N/A 12.16 7
200m 24.95 7 q N/A 24.34 7
400m 53.82 7 q N/A 56.35 8
Richard Colman T53 100m 15.92 9 Did not advance
200m 27.42 7 q N/A 28.12 7
800m 1:40.33 3 Q N/A 1:38.68 PR 1st place, gold medalist(s)
Roy Daniell T13 Marathon N/A 2:42:17 2nd place, silver medalist(s)
Don Elgin T44 100m DNS Did not advance
Kurt Fearnley T54 800m 1:37.90 6 Q N/A 1:32.73 4
1500m 3:04.77 10 Q 3:08.62 9 Q 3:05.79 4
5000m 10:24.54 2 Q N/A 10:23.98 PR 1st place, gold medalist(s)
Marathon N/A 1:25:37 1st place, gold medalist(s)
Heath Francis T46 100m 11.21 5 Q N/A 11.09 2nd place, silver medalist(s)
200m 22.39 2 Q N/A 22.73 3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
400m 52.12 3 Q N/A 48.72 2nd place, silver medalist(s)
Neil Fuller T44 100m DNS Did not advance
200m 24.28 5 Q N/A 23.45 5
400m 54.21 3 Q N/A 53.15 2nd place, silver medalist(s)
Benjamin Hall T37 200m 26.10 7 q N/A 26.37 8
400m N/A 59.41 7
Paul Harpur T11 200m 24.92 17 Did not advance
400m 54.31 7 Q 55.74 7 54.50 7
Lachlan Jones T52 200m 34.30 8 q N/A 33.89 7
800m 2:05.42 4 q N/A 2:10.75 7
1500m 4:08.80 10 q N/A 3:59.15 5
John Lindsay T53 100m 16.12 14 Did not advance
200m 28.18 15 Did not advance
Tim Matthews T46 100m 16.44 14 Did not advance
Richard Nicholson T54 100m 15.05 13 q 15.33 15 Did not advance
Paul Nunnari T54 1500m 3:06.53 14 Did not advance
5000m 11:08.42 23 Did not advance
10000m 23:44.16 23 Did not advance
Marathon N/A 1:43.16 19
Frederic Periac T54 800m 1:42.32 21 Did not advance
1500m 3:10.62 29 Did not advance
Tim Sullivan T38 100m 11.63 1 Q N/A 11.37 WR 1st place, gold medalist(s)
200m 23.68 1 Q N/A 22.92 WR 1st place, gold medalist(s)
400m 51.42 1 Q N/A 51.41 1st place, gold medalist(s)
Darren Thrupp T37 100m 12.44 5 Q N/A 12.52 3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
Geoff Trappett T54 100m 14.87 7 q 14.91 7 Q 15.00 6
200m 26.56 11 Did not advance
Stephen Wilson T44 200m 24.42 6 Q N/A 23.75 7
400m 56.19 7 q N/A 53.98 4
Paul Benz
Darren Thrupp
Benjamin Hall
Tim Sullivan
T35-38 4 × 100 m relay N/A 46.73 WR 1st place, gold medalist(s)
4 × 400 m relay N/A DNF
Heath Francis
Stephen Wilson
Neil Fuller
Don Elgin
T42-46 4 × 100 m relay N/A 44.03 3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
4 × 400 m relay N/A 3:33.55 2nd place, silver medalist(s)
Richard Colman
Richard Nicholson
Kurt Fearnley
Geoff Trappett
T53-54 4 × 100 m relay 53.51 3 Q N/A 52.10 2nd place, silver medalist(s)
Richard Colman
Frederic Periac
Richard Nicholson
Kurt Fearnley
T53-54 4 × 400 m relay 3:19.10 5 Did not advance

Men's field

Athlete Class Event Final
Result Points Rank
Kieran Ault F37 Javelin 45.77 - 2nd place, silver medalist(s)
Damien Burroughs F37 Discus 42.44 - 5
Javelin 30.56 - 8
Shot put 10.78 - 6
Don Elgin F44/46 Discus 41.13 822 7
Shot put 12.19 839 12
P44 Pentathlon 4152 3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
Rodney Farr F52 Discus 15.08 - 6
Shot put 8.19 - 5
F52-53 Javelin 14.58 912 9
Brian Harvey F36/38 Javelin 37.39 - 8
F38 Discus 28.71 - 8
Shot put 9.61 - 9
Nicholas Larionow F36 Discus 27.92 - 7
Shot put 11.17 - 3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
Hamish MacDonald F33-34 Discus 29.23 871 6
Shot put 11.16 WR 1056 2nd place, silver medalist(s)
Richard Nicholson P54-58 Pentathlon 4662 10
Russell Short F12 Discus 42.54 - 5
F13 Shot put 15.54 - 3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
Darren Thrupp F36-38 Long jump 5.98 1033 3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
Bruce Wallrodt F54 Javelin 24.25 - 5
Shot put 8.63 - 5

Women's track

Athlete Class Event Heats Final
Result Rank Result Rank
Angela Ballard T53 100m N/A 17.87 3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
200m 33.14 11 Did not advance
400m 1:03.01 8 q 1:02.73 7
800m 2:08.81 7 Q 2:02.29 5
Gemma Buchholz T52 200m 42.15 5 q 43.81 6
400m 1:26.26 7 q 1:22.67 5
Christie Dawes T54 800m 1:54.24 7 Q 1:52.51 6
1500m 3:38.60 10 q 3:29.50 6
5000m 12:00.07 3 12:50.86 10
Marathon N/A 2:08.25 9
Amanda Fraser T37 100m N/A 16.56 6
Lara Hollow T13 100m N/A 13.79 7
400m N/A 1:03.65 5
Lisa McIntosh T37 100m N/A 14.81 3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
200m N/A 30.56 2nd place, silver medalist(s)
Louise Sauvage T54 400m N/A 2nd place, silver medalist(s)
800m 1:53.27 1 Q 1:50.88 2nd place, silver medalist(s)
Eliza Stankovic T54 200m 31.58 7 Q 31.36 7
800m 1:53.78 6 Q 1:52.79 7
1500m 3:36.63 3 Q 3:28.66 4
5000m 12:21.08 8 Q 12:18.46 7
Katrina Webb T38 400m N/A 1:05.41 PR 1st place, gold medalist(s)
Amy Winters T46 100m 12.64 1 Q 12.50 PR 1st place, gold medalist(s)
200m 25.77 2 Q 25.54 WR 1st place, gold medalist(s)

Women's field

Athlete Class Event Final
Result Points Rank
Joanne Bradshaw F37 Discus 20.17 708 9
F37/38 Shot put 8.60 933 7
Amanda Fraser F37 Discus 26.30 701 2nd place, silver medalist(s)
F37/38 Shot put 7.76 842 11
Louise Ellery F32-34/52/53 Discus NMR
Shot put 4.93 1100 6
Julie Iles F40 Discus 15.90 - 6
Javelin 13.49 - 6
Shot put 4.79 - 9
Katrina Webb F35-38 Javelin 28.47 WR 1223 4
Debbie Wendt F35-38 Javelin 18.77 846 12
F37 Discus 22.51 705 6
Jodi Willis F12 Discus 36.67 - 4
Shot put 11.95 - 3rd place, bronze medalist(s)

Coaches - Scott Goodman (Head), Paul Angel, Richard Bednall, Andrew Dawes, Iryna Dvoskina, John Eden, Brett Jones, Gary Lees, Alison O'Riordan

Officials - Andrew Faichney (Manager), Louise Mogg, Paul Rohwer, Greg Jones, Jodie Carey

Cycling

See also: Cycling at the 2004 Summer Paralympics

Australia were top of the medal table in cycling.

Men's road race

Athlete Event Time Rank
Anthony Biddle
Kial Stewart (pilot)
Tandem road race / time trial B1-3 - 22
Kieran Modra
Robert Crowe (pilot)
Tandem road race / time trial B1-3 - 3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
Greg Ball Road race / time trial LC4 1:36:32 5
Peter Brooks Road race / time trial LC1 - 3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
Mark le Flohic Tricycle road race CP div 1/2 46:53 1st place, gold medalist(s)
Tricycle time trial CP div 1/2 10:06.84 2nd place, silver medalist(s)
Peter Homann Road race / time trial CP div 4 - 2nd place, silver medalist(s)
Andrew Panazzolo Road race / time trial CP div 3 1:20:18 6
Christopher Scott Road race / time trial CP div 4 - 1st place, gold medalist(s)

Men's track cycling (pairs / teams)

Athlete Event Ranking Round Quarterfinals Semifinals Final
Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank Opposition
Time
Rank
Anthony Biddle
Kial Stewart (pilot)
1km time trial tandem B1-3 N/A 1:05.14 1st place, gold medalist(s)
Sprint tandem B1-3 10.800 2 Q  Janowski (FRA)
 Senmartin (FRA)
W 11.160  Janovjak (SVK)
 Petrovic (SVK)
L 1 - 2  Yoshihara (JPN)
 Oki (JPN)
L 1 - 2
4
Kieran Modra
Robert Crowe (pilot)
Individual pursuit tandem B1-3 4:21.45 WR 1 Q N/A  Solem (CAN)
 Cowie (CAN)
W OVL  Mulder (NED)
 Schoots (NED)
W 4:23.87
1st place, gold medalist(s)
Kieran Modra
David Short (pilot)
1km time trial tandem B1-3 N/A 1:06.94 7
Sprint tandem B1-3 10.771 WR 1 Q  Oshiro (JPN)
 Tanzawa (JPN)
W 2 - 0  Yoshihara (JPN)
 Oki (JPN)
W 2 - 0  Janovjak (SVK)
 Petrovic (SVK)
W W/O
1st place, gold medalist(s)
Greg Ball
Peter Brooks
Peter Homann
Christopher Scott
Team sprint LC1-4 / CP 3/4 53.310 1 Q N/A  Canada (CAN) W 53.874  United States (USA)
W 53.968
1st place, gold medalist(s)

Men's track cycling (individual)

Athlete Event Qualification Final
Time Rank Opposition
Time
Rank
Greg Ball 1km time trial LC1-4 N/A 1:07.67 WR 1st place, gold medalist(s)
Peter Brooks 1km time trial LC1-4 N/A 1:10.25 5
Individual pursuit LC1 4:52.81 1 Q  Eibeck (AUT)
W 4:52.48
1st place, gold medalist(s)
Peter Homann Individual pursuit CP div 4 3:43.32 2 Q  Scott (AUS)
L 3:41.44
2nd place, silver medalist(s)
Andrew Panazzolo 1km time trial CP div 3/4 N/A 1:10.22 2nd place, silver medalist(s)
Individual pursuit CP div 3 4:06.52 3 q  Eckhard (ESP)
W 3:58.87
3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
Christopher Scott 1km time trial CP div 3/4 N/A 1:11.67 4
Individual pursuit CP div 4 3:35.37 PR 1 Q  Homann (AUS)
W 3:32.96 WR
1st place, gold medalist(s)

Women's road race

Athlete Event Time Rank
Lindy Hou
Toireasa Ryan (pilot)
Tandem road race / time trial B1-3 - 2nd place, silver medalist(s)
Lyn Lepore
Janelle Lindsay (pilot)
Tandem road race / time trial B1-3 - 9
Janet Shaw
Kelly McCombie (pilot)
Tandem road race / time trial B1-3 1:57:20 3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
Claire McLean Time trial LC1-4/CP 3/4 27:39.95 2nd place, silver medalist(s)

Women's track cycling

Athlete Event Qualification Semifinals Final
Time Rank Time Rank Opposition
Time
Rank
Lindy Hou
Janelle Lindsay (pilot)
1km time trial tandem B1-3 N/A 1:11.78 3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
Sprint tandem B1-3 11.675 WR 1 Q  MacPherson (AUS)
 Lepore (AUS)
W 2 - 0  McGlynn (GBR)
 Hunter (GBR)
W 2 - 0
1st place, gold medalist(s)
Lyn Lepore
Jenny MacPherson (pilot)
1km time trial tandem B1-3 N/A 1:15.45 6
Sprint tandem B1-3 12.645 4 Q  Hou (AUS)
 Lindsay (AUS)
L 0 - 2  Whitsell (USA)
 Compton (USA)
DNS
4
Janet Shaw
Kelly McCombie
1km time trial tandem B1-3 N/A 1:12.53 4
Claire McLean 1km time trial LC1-4 / CP 3/4 N/A 1:21.95 8

Coaches - Kevin McIntosh (Head), Darryl Benson, Andrew Budge

Officials - Elsa Lepore (Manager), John Beer, Paul Lamond

Equestrian

See also: Equestrian at the 2004 Summer Paralympics

Individual

Athlete Event Total
Score Rank
Georgia Bruce Individual championship test grade IV 61.419 14
Individual freestyle test grade IV 67.000 12
Marita Hird Individual championship test grade III 67.520 6
Individual freestyle test grade III 73.389 4
Jan Pike Individual championship test grade I 71.895 2nd place, silver medalist(s)
Individual championship test grade I 74.375 3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
Anne Skinner Individual championship test grade III 61.280 12
Individual freestyle test grade III 68.500 9

Mixed team

Athlete Event Total
Score Rank
Georgia Bruce
Marita Hird
Jan Pike
Anne Skinner
Mixed team 401.014 6

Coaches - Gillian Rickard (Head), Anne Hall

Officials - Sue Cusack (Manager), Judy Fyfe

Judo

See also: Judo at the 2004 Summer Paralympics

Men

Athlete Event Preliminary Quarterfinals Semifinals Repechage
round 1
Repechage
round 2
Final/
Bronze medal contest
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Anthony Clarke 90kg  Cruz Alonso (CUB)
W 1000-0000
 Kretsul (RUS)
L 0000–1000
N/A  Fernández (ESP)
L 0000-1000
Did not advance

Women

Athlete Event Quarterfinals Semifinals Repechage
round 1
Repechage
round 2
Final/
Bronze medal contest
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Desiree Allan 52kg  Schuetzel (GER)
L 0000–1000
N/A  Vlasova (RUS)
L 0000-1000

Coach - Trevor Kschammer (Head), Lara Sullivan

Powerlifting

See also: Powerlifting at the 2004 Summer Paralympics

Men

Athlete Event Result Rank
Darren Gardiner +100 kg 225.0 2nd place, silver medalist(s)
Steve Green 90 kg 175.0 10
Wayne Sharpe 48 kg 125.0 9

Women

Athlete Event Result Rank
Deahnne McIntyre +82.5 kg 130.0 5

Coaches – Martin Leach (Coach), Michael Farrell

Darren Gardiner originally finished third but was awarded the silver medal after Habibollah Mousavi, gold medallist in +100 kg was disqualified after a positive doping test.

Sailing

See also: Sailing at the 2004 Summer Paralympics

Australia represented in sailing:
Men - Jamie Dunross, Colin Harrison, Jeff Milligan, Peter Thompson

Coaches – Lachlan Gilbert (Head), Geoff Chambers

Australia failed to win any medals in the two sailing events.[3][40]

Shooting

See also: Shooting at the 2004 Summer Paralympics

Men

Athlete Event Qualification Final
Score Rank Score Total Rank
Ashley Adams Mixed 10m air rifle prone SH1 598 9 Did not advance
Men's 10m air rifle standing SH1 590 3 Q 102.2 692.2 3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
Mixed 50m rifle prone SH1 595 2 Q 102.8 697.8 2nd place, silver medalist(s)
Men's 50m rifle three positions SH1 1134 6 Q 97.9 1231.9 5
James Nomarhas Mixed 25m pistol SH1 557 10 Did not advance
Peter Worsley Mixed 10m air rifle standing SH2 583 21 Did not advance
Mixed 10m air rifle prone SH2 591 23 Did not advance
David Ziebarth Mixed 10m air rifle prone SH2 591 23 Did not advance

Women

Athlete Event Qualification Final
Score Rank Score Total Rank
Elizabeth Kosmala Mixed 10m air rifle prone SH1 596 22 Did not advance
Women's 10m air rifle standing SH1 381 10 Did not advance
Mixed 50m rifle prone SH1 579 20 Did not advance
Women's 50m rifle three positions SH1 542 8 Q 89.1 631.1 8

Coaches - Miroslav Sipek(Head), Hans Heiderman Officials - Michelle Fletcher (Manager), Craig Jarvis, Elizabeth Ziebarth

Swimming

See also: Swimming at the 2004 Summer Paralympics and Australian Paralympic Swim Team

Men

Athlete Class Event Heats Final
Result Rank Result Rank
Benoit Austin S8 50m freestyle 28.23 3 Q 28.42 3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
100m freestyle 1:01.44 PR 1 Q 59.83 WR 1st place, gold medalist(s)
100m butterfly 1:05.79 WR 1 Q 1:06.57 2nd place, silver medalist(s)
SM8 200m individual medley N/A 2:32.19 2nd place, silver medalist(s)
Daniel Bell S10 50m freestyle 26.54 7 Q 26.62 8
100m freestyle 57.56 7 Q 57.31 7
100m butterfly 59.83 PR 1 Q 59.67 2nd place, silver medalist(s)
SB9 100m breaststroke 1:12.10 WR 1 Q 1:11.79 2nd place, silver medalist(s)
SM10 200m individual medley 2:25.74 6 Q 2:28.59 7
Sam Bramham S9 100m butterfly 1:04.24 WR 1 Q 1:04.25 3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
Matthew Cowdrey S9 50m freestyle 27.29 4 Q 26.88 3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
100m freestyle 58.77 1 Q 58.15 WR 1st place, gold medalist(s)
400m freestyle 4:37.93 5 Q 4:31.80 3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
100m backstroke 1:09.70 6 Q 1:08.44 6
100m butterfly 1:05.34 3 Q 1:04.24 2nd place, silver medalist(s)
SB9 100m breaststroke 1:18.92 13 Did not advance
SM9 200m individual medley 2:26.44 2 Q 2:21.80 WR 1st place, gold medalist(s)
Dale Grant S9 50m freestyle 28.30 14 Did not advance
100m freestyle 1:02.90 19 Did not advance
Alex Hadley S7 50m freestyle 31.00 8 Q 31.08 8
100m freestyle 1:07.71 6 Q 1:06.85 5
400m freestyle 5:17.82 6 Q 5:20.77 6
50m butterfly 36.60 7 Q 36.20 8
Alex Harris S7 50m freestyle 30.62 6 Q 30.12 5
100m freestyle 1:06.95 4 Q 1:05.79 4
50m butterfly 37.68 14 Did not advance
SB7 100m breaststroke 1:40.72 10 Did not advance
Matt Levy S8 50m freestyle 29.98 5 Q 30.14 5
100m freestyle 1:05.21 5 Q 1:04.99 5
400m freestyle 5:07.73 8 Q 5:04.64 8
100m backstroke 1:22.49 10 Did not advance
100m butterfly 1:18.32 10 Did not advance
Jeremy McClure S12 400m freestyle 5:12.70 12 Did not advance
100m backstroke 1:07.85 6 Q 1:08.12 6
SB12 100m breaststroke 1:22.69 17 Did not advance
Ricardo Moffatti S8 50m freestyle 29.60 4 Q 29.42 4
100m freestyle 1:03.73 3 Q 1:03.12 3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
100m butterfly 1:13.72 5 Q 1:13.72 5
Rick Pendleton S10 100m backstroke 1:11.67 13 Did not advance
100m butterfly 1:06.31 11 Did not advance
SB10 100m breaststroke 1:14.98 6 Q 1:14.75 7
SM10 200m individual medley 2:25.34 4 Q 2:22.69 4
Alastair Smales S6 50m freestyle 35.11 12 Did not advance
100m freestyle 1:24.23 14 Did not advance
50m butterfly 34.49 4 Q 34.34 5
Rod Welsh S10 50m freestyle 27.49 14 Did not advance
100m freestyle 57.35 6 Q 57.06 6
100m freestyle 1:06.59 1 Q 1:04.55 3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
SM10 200m individual medley 2:25.09 3 Q 2:22.13 2nd place, silver medalist(s)
Daniel Bell
Sam Bramham
Alex Hadley
Ricardo Moffatti
N/A 4 × 100 m freestyle relay (34pts) 4:07.80 2 Q 4:02.04 2nd place, silver medalist(s)
Sam Bramham
Matthew Cowdrey
Alex Hadley
Rick Pendleton
N/A 4 × 100 m medley relay (34pts) 4:36.92 4 Q 4:26.25 WR 1st place, gold medalist(s)

Women

Athlete Class Event Heats Final
Result Rank Result Rank
Katerina Bailey S9 100m backstroke 1:23.36 11 Did not advance
100m butterfly 1:17.95 5 Q 1:16.61 3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
SM9 200m individual medley 2:55.26 8 Q 2:52.28 6
Sarah Bowen S6 50m freestyle 42.43 10 Did not advance
100m freestyle 1:30.75 10 Did not advance
100m backstroke 1:42.62 7 Q 1:40.35 7
SB6 100m breaststroke 1:46.20 1 Q 1:41.84 WR 1st place, gold medalist(s)
Lichelle Clarke S8 50m freestyle 35.75 10 Did not advance
100m freestyle 1:14.09 6 Q 1:14.51 6
400m freestyle 5:32.39 5 Q 5:22.99 2nd place, silver medalist(s)
100m backstroke 1:29.58 6 Q 1:30.35 7
Mandy Drennan S9 100m freestyle 1:09.52 8 Q 1:08.68 5
100m backstroke 1:19.68 7 Q 1:20.59 8
100m butterfly 1:22.56 11 Did not advance
Marayke Jonkers SB3 50m breaststroke 1:02.96 3 Q 1:02.63 3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
SM4 150m individual medley 3:26.01 4 Q 3:26.90 3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
Kat Lewis S10 50m freestyle 31.06 4 Q 30.82 5
100m freestyle 1:07.39 7 Q 1:06.70 7
400m freestyle 5:07.47 4 Q 5:03.48 4
100m butterfly 1:20.98 6 Q 1:19.93 5
Hannah MacDougall S10 100m freestyle 1:11.99 13 Did not advance
400m freestyle 5:22.33 10 Did not advance
100m backstroke N/A 1:18.17 4
Katrina Porter S8 100m freestyle 1:20.79 11 Did not advance
400m freestyle 5:34.54 6 Q 5:35.63 7
SB6 100m breaststroke 1:57.79 7 Q 1:56.38 7
Sarah Rose S6 50m freestyle 42.89 12 Did not advance
100m freestyle 1:35.00 13 Did not advance
50m butterfly 42.26 3 Q 41.96 3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
SM6 200m individual medley 3:35.55 6 Q 3:36.28 7
Dianne Saunders S7 50m butterfly 52.32 12 Did not advance
SB7 100m breaststroke 1:46.10 4 Q 1:44.99 4
SM7 200m individual medley 3:48.55 10 Did not advance
Kobie Scott S8 100m backstroke 1:30.09 7 Q 1:30.03 7
100m butterfly 1:28.64 5 Q 1:29.20 7
Jessica Smith S9 50m freestyle 33.12 9 Did not advance
100m freestyle 1:12.76 11 Did not advance
100m butterfly 1:23.35 14 Did not advance
Brooke Stockham S8 100m butterfly 1:30.18 7 Q 1:29.47 8
SB8 100m breaststroke 1:34.41 7 Q 1:34.96 7
SM8 200m individual medley 3:09.80 7 Q 3:13.38 8
Prue Watt S13 50m freestyle 29.45 2 Q 28.89 2nd place, silver medalist(s)
100m freestyle 1:03.75 2 Q 1:03.30 2nd place, silver medalist(s)
400m freestyle N/A 4:49.51 2nd place, silver medalist(s)
100m butterfly N/A 1:08.41 2nd place, silver medalist(s)
SB13 100m breaststroke N/A 1:23.07 3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
SM13 200m individual medley N/A 2:34.93 2nd place, silver medalist(s)
Stacey Williams S7 50m freestyle 41.18 14 Did not advance
100m freestyle 6:49.12 11 Did not advance
SB7 100m breaststroke 1:49.82 6 Q 1:50.84 6
SM7 200m individual medley 3:40.17 10 Did not advance
Chantel Wolfenden S7 50m freestyle 36.48 5 Q 35.62 5
100m freestyle 1:16.36 3 Q 1:15.09 2nd place, silver medalist(s)
400m freestyle 5:22.71 PR 1 Q 5:20.26 PR 1st place, gold medalist(s)
100m backstroke 1:32.58 3 Q 1:29.81 3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
50m butterfly 40.26 5 Q 38.99 5
SM7 200m individual medley 3:09.97 2 Q 3:10.46 3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
Kat Lewis
Lichelle Clarke
Chantel Wolfenden
Mandy Drennan
N/A 4 × 100 m freestyle relay (34pts) N/A 4:44.57 3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
Chantel Wolfenden
Katerina Bailey
Brooke Stockham
Hannah MacDougall
N/A 4 × 100 m medley relay (34pts) N/A 5:25.02 3rd place, bronze medalist(s)

Coaches - Brendan Keogh (Head), John Beckworth, Peter Bishop, Graeme Carroll, Gwen Godfrey, Paul Simms

Officials - Adam Luscombe (Manager), Zoe Young, Brendan Burkett,

Wheelchair basketball

See also: Wheelchair basketball at the 2004 Summer Paralympics

Men

Before the Athens 2004 wheelchair basketball competition, the men's team, popularly called The Rollers, goal was to improve their fifth place from Sydney. With the help of quality leadership from both staff and senior players they succeeded and won the silver medal playing against Canada.[39]

The silver medal would not have been possible without a great collective effort from the coaches or managerial staff.

Coaching and managerial staff

Results

Game Match Score Rank
1 Australia vs.  Canada (CAN) 38 - 66 2 Q
2 Australia vs.  Great Britain (GBR) 80 - 59
3 Australia vs.  Italy (ITA) 57 - 52
4 Australia vs.  Brazil (BRA) 66 - 51
5 Australia vs.  France (FRA) 74 - 53
Quarterfinals Australia vs.  Germany (GER) 79 - 60 W
Semifinals Australia vs.  Great Britain (GBR) 64 - 52 W
Gold medal final Australia vs.  Canada (CAN) 53 - 70 2nd place, silver medalist(s)

Looking to improve from their loss in the Sydney 2000 Paralympics wheelchair final, the women's Wheelchair basketball team, also called The Gliders, went undefeated through the preliminary rounds beating US, Great Britain and the Netherlands. In the quarterfinal they beat Mexico before they moved on to beat Germany in the semifinals. In the finals, the US awaited. For the second time in as many Paralympic games, The Gliders were unable to overcome US, but won the silver medal. The Gliders team, consisting of a total of 12 women, had seven first time Paralympians so the silver medal was a great accomplishment.[39]

Women

Coaching staff

Results

Game Match Score Rank
1 Australia vs.  United States (USA) 62 - 61 1 Q
2 Australia vs.  Great Britain (GBR) 63 - 21
3 Australia vs.  Netherlands (NED) 30 - 25
Quarterfinals Australia vs.  Japan (JPN) 70 - 33 W
Semifinals Australia vs.  Canada (CAN) 57 - 40 W
Gold medal final Australia vs.  United States (USA) 44 - 56 2nd place, silver medalist(s)

Coaches and officials

Coaches: Alan Cox, Darryl Durham, Craig Friday, Gerry Hewson, Bernard Treseder.

Officials - Kelvin Browner, Michael Dowling, Sonia Healy (Manager).

Wheelchair rugby

See also: Wheelchair rugby at the 2004 Summer Paralympics

The men's rugby team didn't win any medals: they were 5th out of 12.

Players

Results

Game Match Score Rank
1 Australia vs.  New Zealand (NZL) 31 - 41 3 Q
2 Australia vs.  Japan (JPN) 48 - 47
3 Australia vs.  United States (USA) 38 - 49
Quarterfinals Australia vs.  Canada (CAN) 33 - 36 L
Semifinals (5th-8th) Australia vs.  Germany (GER) 44 - 40 W
5th-6th classification Australia vs.  Belgium (BEL) 46 - 43 5

Coaches and officials

Coaches: Glenn Stephens and Terry Vinyard

Officials: Robert Doidge, Kim Ellwood and Maria Spiller.

Wheelchair tennis

See also: Wheelchair tennis at the 2004 Summer Paralympics

Men

Athlete Class Event Round of 64 Round of 32 Round of 16 Quarterfinals Semifinals Finals
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Anthony Bonaccurso Open Singles  Vazouras (GRE)
W 6–1, 6-0
 Lee (KOR)
W 6–2, 6-3
 Welch (USA)
L 1–6, 3-6
Did not advance
David Hall Open Singles  Diaz (ARG)
W 6–0, 6-1
 Mendez (CHI)
W 6–0, 6-2
 Rydberg (USA)
W 6–0, 6-3
 Kunieda (JPN)
W 6–2, 0–6, 6-4
 Jeremiasz (FRA)
W 6–1, 6-1
 Ammerlaan (NED)
L 2–6, 1-6 2nd place, silver medalist(s)
Ben Weekes Open Singles  Victor (RSA)
W 6–1, 6-2
 Ammerlaan (NED)
L 0–6, 0-6
Did not advance
Anthony Bonaccurso
David Hall
Open Doubles N/A  Kruamai (THA) /  Peem Mee (THA)
W 6–1, 6-3
 Welch (USA) /  Greer (USA)
W 6–4, 6-3
 Kunieda (JPN) /  Saida (JPN)
L 6–4, 4–6, 6-7
 Ammerlaan (NED) /  Stuurman (NED)
W 6–4, 6–7, 6-4 3rd place, bronze medalist(s)

Women

Athlete Class Event Round of 32 Round of 16 Quarterfinals Semifinals Finals
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Daniela Di Toro Open Singles  Fabre (FRA)
W 6–3, 6–1
 Chokyu (CAN)
W 6–1, 6–3
 Forshaw (GBR)
W 7–6, 6-0
 Peters (NED)
L 5–7, 6–4, 3-6
Bronze medal match
 Gravellier (FRA)
W 1–6, 6–2, 6-2

Coaches - Greg Crump (Head)

Officials - Sallee Trewin (Manager)

Administration

Headquarters staff - Paul Bird (Chef de Mission), Ken Brown (Assistant Chef de Mission), Nick Dean (Assistant Chef de Mission), Doug Denby (Assistant Chef de Mission), Jason Hellwig (Director of Operations), Natalie Jenkins (Sports Administration Officer), Jacqui Knife (Sports Administration Officer), Richard Mathews (Attache), Stephen Mathews (Manager Security), Tony Naar (Manager Sport), Graeme Watts
Sports Medicine and Sports Science - Syd Bourke (Director Medical), John Camens, Lily Chiu, Liz Cloughessy (Medical Coordinator), Kieran Cusack, Maria Di Michele, Mick Jordan, David Lee, Murray Lydeamore (Welfare Coordinator), Mark MacDonald, Ingrid McKay, Claire Nichols, David Spurrier, Greg Ungerer, Luke Vladich
Media - Graham Cassidy, Katie Hodge, Margaret McDonald, David Lutteral[3][40]

See also

References

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  2. ^ "Medal Standings Athens 2004 Paralympic Games". International Paralympic Committee. Archived from the original on 5 June 2011. Retrieved 8 June 2011.
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  10. ^ "Athlete Biographies - Ben Austin". International Paralympic Committee. Retrieved 18 October 2017.
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  12. ^ "About Lindy". LindyHou.com. Archived from the original on 7 July 2017. Retrieved 18 October 2017.
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  26. ^ Burkett, Brendan (2010). "Technology in Paralympic sport: performance enhancement or essential for performance?". British Journal of Sports Medicine. 44 (3): 215–220. doi:10.1136/bjsm.2009.067249. PMID 20231602. S2CID 2722152.
  27. ^ Burkett, Brendan (2010). "Technology in Paralympic sport: performance enhancement or essential for performance?". British Journal of Sports Medicine. 44 (3): 215–220. doi:10.1136/bjsm.2009.067249. PMID 20231602. S2CID 2722152.
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