Bernard D. Rostker
Bernard Rostker.jpg
United States Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness
In office
May 23, 2000 – June 2001
PresidentBill Clinton
George W. Bush
Preceded byCharles Cragin (acting)
Succeeded byDavid S. C. Chu
United States Under Secretary of the Army
In office
October 1998 – May 23, 2000
PresidentBill Clinton
Preceded byRobert M. Walker
Succeeded byGregory R. Dahlberg
United States Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Manpower and Reserve Affairs
In office
October 7, 1994 – October 1998
PresidentBill Clinton
Preceded byFrederick Pang
Succeeded byCarolyn H. Becraft
Director of the Selective Service System
In office
November 26, 1979 – July 31, 1981
PresidentJimmy Carter
Ronald Reagan
Preceded byRobert E. Shuck
Succeeded byJames G. Bond
Personal details
Born
Bernard Daniel Rostker

(1944-02-01) February 1, 1944 (age 78)
Bronx, New York, U.S.
Spouse(s)Louise
Alma materNew York University (BS)
Syracuse University (MA, PhD)
Military service
Allegiance United States
Branch/service
Seal of the United States Army Reserve.svg
United States Army Reserve
Years of service1968–1970
Rank
US-O3 insignia.svg
Captain[1]

Bernard Daniel Rostker (born February 1, 1944)[2][3][4][5] was Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Manpower and Reserve Affairs) from 1977 to 1979; Director of the United States Selective Service System from 1979 to 1981; Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Manpower and Reserve Affairs) from 1994 to 1998; Under Secretary of the Army from 1998 to 2000; and Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness in 2000-2001. From 1996 to 2001, he also served as Special Assistant to the Deputy Secretary of Defense for Gulf War Illnesses.

Early life and education

Rostker was born in The Bronx in 1944 and graduated from Taft High School in June 1960 at the age of sixteen. He then attended New York University, receiving a B.S. in Education and Economics in 1964.[3][4][5] While in college, he participated in the Reserve Officers' Training Corps, graduating as a Distinguished Military Graduate and being commissioned as a Second Lieutenant in the United States Army Reserve.[6] He next attended Syracuse University, earning an M.A. in Economics in 1966 and then a Ph.D. in Economics in 1970.[1][3][4][5] His master's thesis was entitled The economics of manpower retraining[7] and his doctoral thesis was entitled Manpower theory and policy and the residual occupational elasticity of substitution. His doctoral advisor was Jerry Miner.[8][9]

Early career

In 1968, he reported for active duty in the Army and joined the Manpower Requirements Directorate of the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Systems Analysis as an economist. After completing his military commitment at the rank of Captain two years later, he joined RAND as a research economist, becoming Program Director of the Manpower Personnel and Training Program, a program sponsored by the United States Air Force.[1]

He joined the United States Department of the Navy in 1977, upon being named Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Manpower and Reserve Affairs.[6]

In 1979, he became Director of the Selective Service System, holding this post November 26, 1979 – July 31, 1981. The selective service registration requirement for all U.S. men aged 18–25, had been abolished by President Gerald Ford in 1975, but was reestablished when President Jimmy Carter signed Proclamation 4771, Registration Under the Military Selective Service Act on July 2, 1980, retroactively re-establishing the Selective Service registration requirement for all 18- to 26-year-old male citizens born on or after January 1, 1960. Rostker thus oversaw the Selective Service Revitalization Plan which registered four million men for selective service. He is the named defendant in the U.S. Supreme Court case of Rostker v. Goldberg, 453 U.S. 57 (1981), which upheld the constitutionality of requiring only men to register for selective service.[10]

Rostker joined the Center for Naval Analyses in 1981, becoming Director for the Navy's Management Program. In that capacity he conducted research into the major management issues facing the United States Navy.

In 1983, he joined software development company SRA International as Director of the Systems Management Division. He returned to RAND in December 1984 to help establish the Arroyo Center, the Army's federally funded research and development center for studies and analysis. He served as Program Director of the Force Development and Employment Program and Associate Director of the Center. In January 1990, he shifted to RAND's National Defense Research Institute as Director of the Defense Manpower Research Center.

Clinton administration

In October 1994, President Bill Clinton nominated Rostker as Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Manpower and Reserve Affairs) and Rostker subsequently held this office from October 1994 until October 1998. On November 12, 1996, he was also named Special Assistant to the Deputy Secretary of Defense for Gulf War Illnesses and became responsible for coordinating and overseeing all of the United States Department of Defense's responses to Gulf War Illnesses.

President Clinton nominated Rostker as Under Secretary of the Army and he was sworn in on October 26, 1998, while retaining his responsibilities for Gulf War Illness issues. As Under Secretary of the Army, Rostker was the #2 civilian in the United States Department of the Army; was responsible for assisting the Secretary of the Army in recruiting, organizing, supplying, equipping, training and mobilizing the Army and managing its $64 billion annual budget and more than 1.3 million active duty, National Guard, Army Reserve and civilian personnel; and assumed the duties of acting Secretary of the Army when the Secretary was not available.

After a nomination from President Clinton and confirmation by the United States Senate, Rostker was sworn in as the Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness on May 23, 2000. In that capacity, he was the senior adviser to the United States Secretary of Defense on recruitment, career development, pay and benefits for 1.4 million active duty military personnel, 1.3 million Guard and Reserve personnel and 725,000 DoD civilians. He also oversaw the Military Health System, the Defense Commissary Agency, the Army and Air Force Exchange Service, the Department of Defense Education Activity, and the Defense Equal Opportunity Management Institute. He was also responsible for overseeing research on the nation's military readiness. Rostker was replaced by David S. C. Chu, who was sworn in as Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness on June 1, 2001. He was a resident of Great Falls, Virginia during his service in the Clinton Administration.[11][12]

Later life

Upon leaving government service, Rostker returned to RAND and his research there has focused on managing the recruitment, retention, and performance of police officers in large city departments; managing the volunteer military; and reforming the military by lengthening military careers.

Personal

Rostker married Louise Cowen in 1966. They have two sons.[4][5]

Publications

References

  1. ^ a b c "Biographical Sketch of Bernard Daniel Rostker". Nomination of Bernard D. Rostker: Hearing Before the Committee on Armed Services, United States Senate, Ninety-Sixth Congress, First Session. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office. November 16, 1979. pp. 2–3. Retrieved 2022-03-23.
  2. ^ date & year of birth according to LCNAF CIP data
  3. ^ a b c "Nominations Before the Senate Armed Services Committee, Second Session, 103d Congress: Hearings Before the Committee on Armed Services, United States Senate". Vol. 103, no. 873. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office. 1994. pp. 1208–1211. ISBN 978-0-16-046386-0.
  4. ^ a b c d "Nominations Before the Senate Armed Services Committee, Second Session, 105th Congress: Hearings Before the Committee on Armed Services, United States Senate". Vol. 105, no. 868. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office. 1999. pp. 984–986. ISBN 978-0-16-058279-0. Retrieved 2022-03-23.
  5. ^ a b c d "Nominations Before the Senate Armed Services Committee, Second Session, 106th Congress: Hearings Before the Committee on Armed Services, United States Senate". Vol. 106, no. 985. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office. 2001. pp. 116–118. ISBN 978-0-16-065714-6. Retrieved 2022-03-23.
  6. ^ a b "The Honorable Bernard D. Rostker". Archived from the original on 2005-11-22. Retrieved 2010-02-01.
  7. ^ The economics of manpower retraining (Thesis). Syracuse University. 1966. Retrieved 2022-03-23.
  8. ^ Manpower Theory and Policy and the Residual Occupational Elasticity of Substitution (Thesis). Springfield, Virginia: National Technical Information Service. June 1970. Retrieved 2022-03-23.
  9. ^ "2.3 Completed Dissertation Grants". Manpower Research Projects Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Labor, Manpower Administration Through June 30, 1970. U.S. Department of Labor. 1970. p. 160. Retrieved 2022-03-23.
  10. ^ Londono, Ernesto (January 26, 2013). "Can women be drafted? Selective Service question is revived". The Washington Post.
  11. ^ "PRESIDENT CLINTON NAMES BERNARD ROSTKER AS UNDER SECRETARY OF THE ARMY (Clinton Administration White House Archives)". Archived from the original on 2011-10-26. Retrieved 2014-05-22.
  12. ^ "PRESIDENT CLINTON NAMES BERNARD ROSTKER AS ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR FORCE MANAGEMENT POLICY (Clinton Administration White House Archives)". Archived from the original on 2016-03-03. Retrieved 2014-05-22.
Government offices Preceded byRobert E. Shuck Director of the Selective Service System November 26, 1979 – July 31, 1981 Succeeded byJames G. Bond Preceded byFrederick Pang Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Manpower and Reserve Affairs) October 1994 – October 1998 Succeeded byCarolyn H. Becraft Preceded byRobert M. Walker United States Under Secretary of the Army October 1998 – May 2000 Succeeded byGregory R. Dahlberg Preceded byRudy de Leon Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness May 23, 2000 – ca. June 2001 Succeeded byDavid S. C. Chu