Cinchocaine
Cinchocaine.svg
Cinchocaine 3D ball-and-stick.png
Clinical data
AHFS/Drugs.comInternational Drug Names
Routes of
administration
topical, intravenous (for animal euthanasia)
ATC code
Legal status
Legal status
Identifiers
  • 2-butoxy-N-[2-(diethylamino)ethyl]quinoline-4-carboxamide
CAS Number
PubChem CID
IUPHAR/BPS
DrugBank
ChemSpider
UNII
KEGG
ChEBI
ChEMBL
CompTox Dashboard (EPA)
ECHA InfoCard100.001.484 Edit this at Wikidata
Chemical and physical data
FormulaC20H29N3O2
Molar mass343.471 g·mol−1
3D model (JSmol)
  • O=C(c1c2ccccc2nc(OCCCC)c1)NCCN(CC)CC
  • InChI=1S/C20H29N3O2/c1-4-7-14-25-19-15-17(16-10-8-9-11-18(16)22-19)20(24)21-12-13-23(5-2)6-3/h8-11,15H,4-7,12-14H2,1-3H3,(H,21,24) checkY
  • Key:PUFQVTATUTYEAL-UHFFFAOYSA-N checkY
  (verify)

Cinchocaine (INN/BAN) or dibucaine (USAN) is an amide local anesthetic. Among the most potent and toxic of the long-acting local anesthetics, current use of cinchocaine is generally restricted to spinal and topical anesthesia.[1][2] It is sold under the brand names Cincain, Nupercainal, Nupercaine and Sovcaine.

Medical use

Cinchocaine is the active ingredient in some topical hemorrhoid creams such as Proctosedyl.[3] It is also a component of the veterinary drug Somulose, used for euthanasia of horses and cattle.

Physical properties

Cinchocaine is relatively insoluble in alkaline aqueous solutions.

See also

References

  1. ^ Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1006
  2. ^ Dibucaine
  3. ^ "Proctosedyl ointment/suppositories (cinchocaine, hydrocortisone)". Netdoctor. June 2012. Retrieved 25 December 2019.

Further reading