CW-12 Sport Trainer and CW-16 Light Sport
Curtiss travel air cw-12q g-aaok arp.jpg
Curtiss-Wright Travel Air CW-12W (built 2009)
Role Civil trainer
Manufacturer Curtiss-Wright
First flight 1931
Status Some airworthy in 2009
Primary user Private owners
Number built 63

The Curtiss-Wright CW-12 Sport Trainer and CW-16 Light Sport (also marketed under the Travel Air brand that Curtiss-Wright had recently acquired) were high-performance training aircraft designed by Herbert Rawdon and Ted Wells and built in the United States in the early 1930s.

Development

The CW-12 and CW-16 shared the same basic design as conventional single-bay biplanes with staggered wings braced with N-struts. The pilot and instructor sat in tandem, open cockpits, the forward cockpit of the CW-12 having a single seat, while the CW-16's forward cockpit could seat two passengers side-by-side. Both versions of the aircraft were available in a variety of engine choices, and some CW-16s were exported as trainers to the air forces of Bolivia and Ecuador.

Variants

Curtiss Travel Air 16E at the Historic Aircraft Restoration Museum
Curtiss Travel Air 16E at the Historic Aircraft Restoration Museum
CW-12
CW-16

Operators

Civil owners in USA and United Kingdom

 Argentina
 Bolivia
 Brazil
 Colombia
 Ecuador

Specifications (CW-12Q)

Data from Curtiss Aircraft 1907–1947[6]

General characteristics

Performance

References

Citations

  1. ^ a b c Bowers 1979, p.402.
  2. ^ a b c Bowers 1979, p. 408.
  3. ^ Hagedorn Air Enthusiast March to May 1992, p. 76.
  4. ^ a b c Hagedorn Air Enthusiast March to May 1992, p. 75.
  5. ^ Hagedorn Air Enthusiast March to May 1992, pp. 75–76.
  6. ^ Bowers 1979, p.403.
  7. ^ Lednicer, David. "The Incomplete Guide to Airfoil Usage". m-selig.ae.illinois.edu. Retrieved 16 April 2019.

Bibliography