F-27 / FH-227
Fairchild-Hil FH.227B PP-BUH Congonhas 06.05.72 edited-2.jpg
A Fairchild Hiller FH-227B of VARIG at Congonhas Airport Sao Paulo in 1972
Role Airliner
Manufacturer Fairchild Hiller
First flight April 12, 1958 (F-27)
February 2, 1966 (FH-227)[1]
Introduction 1958
Status Retired
Number built 128 (F-27)
78 (FH-227)
Developed from Fokker F27 Friendship

The Fairchild F-27 and Fairchild Hiller FH-227 were versions of the Fokker F27 Friendship twin-engined turboprop passenger aircraft manufactured under license by Fairchild Hiller in the United States. The Fairchild F-27 was similar to the standard Fokker F27, while the FH-227 was an independently developed stretched version.

Design and development

Fairchild F-27J of Air South in 1974, showing the shorter fuselage of this version
Fairchild F-27J of Air South in 1974, showing the shorter fuselage of this version

The Fokker F27 began life as a 1950 design study known as the P275, a 32-seater powered by two Rolls-Royce Dart turboprops. With the aid of Dutch government funding, the P275 evolved into the F27, which first flew on November 24, 1955. The first prototype was powered by Dart 507s and would have seated 28. To correct a slight tail-heaviness and to allow for more seats, the second prototype (which first flew in January 1957) had a 3-foot-longer (0.91 m) fuselage, which would allow seating for 32.

A Fairchild Hiller FH-227B of the defunct Mohawk Airlines c. 1970
A Fairchild Hiller FH-227B of the defunct Mohawk Airlines c. 1970

By this stage, Fokker had signed an agreement that would see Fairchild build Friendships in the U.S. as the F-27. The first aircraft of either manufacturer to enter service in the U.S. was, in fact, a Fairchild-built F-27, with West Coast Airlines in September 1958. Other Fairchild F-27 operators in the U.S. included Air South, Air West and successor Hughes Airwest, Allegheny Airlines, Aloha Airlines, Bonanza Air Lines, Horizon Air, Ozark Air Lines, Pacific Air Lines, Piedmont Airlines (1948-1989), Northern Consolidated Airlines and successor Wien Air Alaska. Fairchild subsequently manufactured a larger, stretched version of the F-27 being the Fairchild Hiller FH-227 which was operated by U.S.-based air carriers Delta Air Lines, Mohawk Airlines, Northeast Airlines, Ozark Air Lines, Piedmont Airlines (1948-1989) and Wien Air Alaska.

Fairchild F-27s differed from the initial Fokker F27 Mk 100s in having basic seating for 40, heavier external skinning, a lengthened nose capable of housing a weather radar, and additional fuel capacity. They also incorporated a passenger airstair door in the rear of the aircraft, operated by a flight attendant, which eliminated the need for separate stairs on the ground.

Developments were the F-27A with more powerful engines and the F-27B Combi aircraft version. The F-27B Combi mixed passenger/freight version was operated in Alaska by Northern Consolidated Airlines and Wien Air Alaska.

Fairchild independently developed the stretched FH-227, which appeared almost two years earlier than Fokker's similar F27 Mk 500. The FH-227 featured a 1.83 m (6 ft) stretch over standard length F27/F-27s, taking standard seating to 56, with a larger cargo area between the cockpit and the passenger cabin.

Production

An FH-227D used in the movie Alive! in the livery of Fuerza Aérea Uruguaya Flight 571 that crashed in the Andes in 1972
An FH-227D used in the movie Alive! in the livery of Fuerza Aérea Uruguaya Flight 571 that crashed in the Andes in 1972

In addition to the 581 F27s built by Fokker, 128 F-27s and 78 FH-227s were built. As of February 2010, only one Fairchild FH-227 aircraft, FH-227E serial number 501 belonging to the Myanmar Air Force, remained in active service.[citation needed]

Former operators

(Source: Roach & Eastwood)

 Algeria
 Argentina
 Bahamas
 Brazil
 Canada
 Chile
 France
 South Korea
 Turkey
 United States

 Uruguay

 Venezuela

Notable accidents

Of the 78 FH-227s built, 23 crashed.[2]

Specifications (FH-227E)

Data from Jane's All The World's Aircraft 1969-70.[14]

General characteristics

Performance

See also

Related development

Aircraft of comparable role, configuration, and era

Related lists

References

Notes
  1. ^ Becker 1988, pp. 42, 44
  2. ^ Surviving the Andes Plane Crash (2010) Gary Orlando FH-227 historian
  3. ^ http://libraryonline.erau.edu/online-full-text/ntsb/aircraft-accident-reports/AAR69-06.pdf[bare URL PDF]
  4. ^ "Accident description PP-BUF". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 20 May 2011.
  5. ^ Germano da Silva, Carlos Ari César (2008). "O fim da Paraense". O rastro da bruxa: história da aviação comercial brasileira no século XX através dos seus acidentes 1928–1996 (in Portuguese) (2 ed.). Porto Alegre: EDIPUCRS. pp. 267–268. ISBN 978-85-7430-760-2.
  6. ^ "Accident description PT-LBV". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 30 May 2011.
  7. ^ Germano da Silva, Carlos Ari César (2008). "Aru traiçoeiro". O rastro da bruxa: história da aviação comercial brasileira no século XX através dos seus acidentes 1928–1996 (in Portuguese) (2 ed.). Porto Alegre: EDIPUCRS. pp. 327–331. ISBN 978-85-7430-760-2.
  8. ^ Aviation Safety Network CC-CJE accident synopsis retrieved 2010-06-23
  9. ^ Ranter, Harro. "ASN Aircraft accident Fairchild FH-227B F-GCPS Machault".
  10. ^ "Accident description PT-ICA". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 8 May 2011.
  11. ^ Germano da Silva, Carlos Ari César (2008). "Nevoeiro na reta final". O rastro da bruxa: história da aviação comercial brasileira no século XX através dos seus acidentes 1928–1996 (in Portuguese) (2 ed.). Porto Alegre: EDIPUCRS. pp. 361–363. ISBN 978-85-7430-760-2.
  12. ^ "Accident description PT-LCS". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 8 May 2011.
  13. ^ "Accident description PP-BUJ". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 14 May 2011.
  14. ^ Taylor 1969, pp. 321–322
Bibliography

Media related to Fairchild F-27 at Wikimedia Commons