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John Bunn
Biographical details
Born(1898-09-26)September 26, 1898
DiedAugust 13, 1979(1979-08-13) (aged 80)
Newbury Park, California
Playing career
Basketball
1917–1920Kansas
Football
1917–1920Kansas
Baseball
c. 1920Kansas
Position(s)Guard, forward (basketball)
Halfback, quarterback (football)
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Basketball
1921–1930Kansas (assistant)
1930–1938Stanford
1946–1956Springfield
1956–1963Colorado State–Greeley
Baseball
1926–1930Kansas
1947Springfield
Head coaching record
Overall315–299 (basketball)
48–50 (baseball)
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
Basketball
1 Helms (1937)
Basketball Hall of Fame
Inducted in 1964 (profile)
College Basketball Hall of Fame
Inducted in 2006

John W. Bunn (September 26, 1898 – August 13, 1979) was an American basketball coach and key contributor to the game of basketball. The Wellston, Ohio native played three seasons under coach Phog Allen at University of Kansas while earning his bachelor's degree (1917–21). He later became an assistant to Allen for nine seasons (1921–30). His In 1930, he became men's basketball head coach at Stanford University, where he coached college all-time great Hank Luisetti. His 1936–37 team finished the season with a 25–2 record[1] and was retroactively named the national champion by the Helms Athletic Foundation and the Premo-Porretta Power Poll.[2][3] After he left Stanford, Bunn went on to coach Springfield College (1946–56) and Colorado State College (now the University of Northern Colorado) (1956–63).

Bunn served as chairman of the Basketball Hall of Fame from 1949 to 1963. On October 1, 1964, Bunn was inducted to the Basketball Hall of Fame as a contributor. For his contribution, the Basketball Hall of Fame annually presents an award in his name.

Bunn died on August 13, 1979, in Newbury Park, California.[4]

Head coaching record

Basketball

Statistics overview
Season Team Overall Conference Standing Postseason
Stanford (PCC) (1930–1938)
1930–31 Stanford 8–9 3–6 4th (South)
1931–32 Stanford 6–14 2–9 4th (South)
1932–33 Stanford 9–18 3–8 3rd (South)
1933–34 Stanford 8–12 5–7 3rd (South)
1934–35 Stanford 10–17 4–8 T–3rd (South)
1935–36 Stanford 21–8 7–5 T–1st (South)
1936–37 Stanford 25–2 10–2 T–1st (South) Helms National Champion
Premo-Porretta National Champion[5]
1937–38 Stanford 21–3 10–2 1st (South)
Stanford: 108–83
Springfield (Independent) (1946–1956)
1946–47 Springfield 15-8
1947–48 Springfield 14-18
1948–49 Springfield 14-9
1949–50 Springfield 15-12
1950–51 Springfield 13-16
1951–52 Springfield 14-12
1952–53 Springfield 19-12
1953–54 Springfield 12-12
1954–55 Springfield 15-11
1955–56 Springfield 8-16
Springfield: 139-126
Colorado State–Greeley (RMFAC) (1956–1963)
1956–57 Colorado State–Greeley 11-10 5-5
1957–58 Colorado State College 6-15 5-5
1958–59 Colorado State College 14-10 12-6
1959–60 Colorado State College 14-11 12-6
1960–61 Colorado State College 8-16 7-7
1961–62 Colorado State College 10-16 8-10
1962–63 Colorado State College 10-16 8-8
Colorado State–Greeley: 73-94
Total: 315–299

      National champion         Postseason invitational champion  
      Conference regular season champion         Conference regular season and conference tournament champion
      Division regular season champion       Division regular season and conference tournament champion
      Conference tournament champion

[6][7]

References

  1. ^ "Stanford Cardinal season-by-season results". sports-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. 2014. Archived from the original on May 15, 2012. Retrieved July 23, 2014.
  2. ^ "NCAA Division I Men's Basketball – NCAA Division I Champions". Rauzulu's Street. 2004. Retrieved July 23, 2014.
  3. ^ ESPN, ed. (2009). ESPN College Basketball Encyclopedia: The Complete History of the Men's Game. New York, NY: ESPN Books. p. 545. ISBN 978-0-345-51392-2.
  4. ^ "Hall of Fame, 80, John Bunn, Dies". The Star Press. Muncie, Indiana. United Press International. August 15, 1979. p. 15. Retrieved December 30, 2020 – via Newspapers.com open access.
  5. ^ ESPN, ed. (2009). ESPN College Basketball Encyclopedia: The Complete History of the Men's Game. New York, NY: ESPN Books. p. 532. ISBN 978-0-345-51392-2.
  6. ^ "Springfield College Men's Basketball All-Time Results". Springfield College Pride.
  7. ^ "Northern Colorado MBB Record Book" (PDF).