Football Academic All-America Team Members of the Year
Awarded forthe yearly outstanding men's American football Academic All-America team member
CountryUnited States & Canada
Presented byCollege Sports Communicators
History
Most recentRome Odunze, Washington
Nolan Reeve, Colorado Mines
Owen Grover, Wartburg
Jaden Meizinger, Keiser
Websiteacademicallamerica.com

Football Academic All-America Team Members of the Year are each the annual most outstanding singular college football athlete of the set of American football athletes selected for the Academic All-America Teams in a given year. The Academic All-America program recognizes combined athletic and academic excellence of the nation's top student-athletes because the All-America teams and team members of the year are selected based on excellence in both classroom achievement and athletic competition performance by the College Sports Communicators (CSC, known before the 2022–23 school year as College Sports Information Directors of America, or CoSIDA).

Formerly, an Academic All-District team of honorees based on CSC member nominations and voting was chosen in each of eight geographic districts across the United States and Canada.[1] Academic All-District and All-America teams were chosen separately for various levels of collegiate athletic competition (known as division)s. For each division, a set of eight districts were delinieated. For the NCAA Division I-level teams, the 2021–22 districts were as follows: – District 1 (CT, MA, ME, NH, NY, RI, VT), District 2 (DC, DE, KY, MD, NJ, PA, WV), District 3 (NC, TN, VA), District 4 (AL, FL, GA, PR, SC), District 5 (IL, IN, MI, OH), District 6 (AR, IA, LA, MN, MO, MS, MT, ND, SD, WI, WY), – District 7 (CO, ID, KS, NE, NM, NV, OK, TX), District 8 (AK, AZ, CA, HI, OR, UT, WA, Canada). Other divisions use other district groupings.[2] Formerly, only first team All-District honorees made the All-America team ballots. In 2022, the All-district selection process was eliminated, with all eligible nominees being included on the Academic All-America final ballot. In addition, Tennis and Swimming & Diving were added as separate sports from the at-large set of sports. Also, the qualifying G.P.A. was raised from 3.3 to 3.5.[3]

From 1996 to 2010, this team selection process was held separately for the college and University Divisions. The University Division Academic All-America and Academic All-District teams included eligible participants from National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I member schools, while the College Division team included scholar-athletes from all of the following: NCAA Division II, NCAA Division III, National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA), Canadian universities and colleges and two-year schools. From each team one winner for each sport was chosen from both the college and University Divisions for all twelve Academic All-America teams including football to be the team member of the year. Thus, all twelve Academic All-American teams (Men's and women's basketball, men's and women's soccer, men's and women's track & field/cross country, men's baseball, women's softball, men's football, women's volleyball and all remaining sanctioned men's and women's sports as at-large teams) had one Academic All-American of the Year each of its divisions. One of these twelve sport-by-sport Academic All-Americans of the year is selected as the Academic All-America Team Member of the Year for each division.[4] The most recent football player to win the all-sports honor is John Matocha of the Colorado School of Mines, who received the Division II awards for the 2022–23 academic year.[5][a]

In 2011, the Academic All-America program was expanded from two to four divisions. NCAA Divisions II and III were separated into their own divisions, while the College Division was then restricted to non-NCAA institutions.[6] Most recently, effective with the 2018–19 school year, the College Division was split, with NAIA members now receiving their own set of awards, while in some sports Two-Year College, Canadian Institutions and any other institution not affiliated with the NCAA or NAIA also get a set of rewards under the College Division.[1] However, the football selection process has incorporated Canada into the districts for the other 4 sets.[2]

History

Media personality headshot
1995 & 1996 winner
Quarterback cocking his arm to throw a football
2008 & 2009 winner
Football player walking
2018 & 2019 winner
Football player gripping his shoulder pads
2020–21 & 2021 winner
(clockwise) Danny Wuerffel, Tim Tebow, Cameron Dukes and Justin Herbert are repeat winners of the award

Although Nebraska Cornhuskers football has the most Football Academic All-America selections,[7] only Rob Zatechka had earned this award for Nebraska.[8]

Several of the Football Academic All-America of the Year winners have gone on to win the overall Academic All-America of the Year. For Division I, Tommy Vardell (1991), Jim Hansen (1992), Rob Zatechka (1994), Danny Wuerffel (1996), Peyton Manning (1997), Matt Stinchcomb (1998), Chad Pennington (1999), Alex Smith (2004), Barrett Jones (2012), Carson Wentz (2015), Justin Herbert (2019), amd Mac Jones (2020–21) all earned the ovearll award. Before the split, College Division selectees Chris Palmer (1995), T.J. Hess (2001), Josh Lamberson (2005) and Greg Micheli (2008) were overall winners. Since the split no Division III or NAIA winners have been the overall Team Member of the Year, but Division II honorees Jason Vander Laan (2015) and John Matocha (2022) have won the overall award.[9]

Several have been repeat winners of this award.[8] For Division I, Justin Herbert is the most recent repeat winner. He was preceded by Tim Tebow and Danny Wuerffel. Before the College Division was divided, its repeat winners included David Gubbrud, Chris Hatcher and Corte McGuffey repeated. Since the split, Ugdam Goya has repeated at Division III and Jake Snodgrass and Cameron Dukes have repeated at NAIA.[8]

Tables of winners

Man in orange blazer headshot
1997 winner
Man signing a football
1999 winner
Man holding football helmet by the facemask
2004 winner
Football player
2012 winner
Man in gold blazer
2015 winner
Man jogging
2020–21 winner
(clockwise) Peyton Manning, Chad Pennington, Barrett Jones, Mac Jones, Carson Wentz and Alex Smith went on to win the overall award.

Names in bold indicate winners of the all-sports Academic All-America award.

Two-division era (1987–2010)

Football Academic All-America Team Members of the Year (1987–2010)
Year University Division Winner School College Division Winner School
1987 Kip Corrington[10] Texas A&M Grant Jones[10] Denison
1988 Paul Sorenson[11] Dartmouth David Gubbrud[11] Augustana (SD)
1989 Michael Thorson[12] Army David Gubbrud[12] Augustana (SD)
1990 Bill Musgrave[13] Oregon Robert O'Toole[13] Carnegie Mellon
1991 Tommy Vardell[14] Stanford Karl Kuhn[14] Arkansas Tech
1992 Jim Hansen[15] Colorado Roderick Tranum[15] MIT
1993 Tim Ruddy[16] Notre Dame Chris Hatcher[16] Valdosta State
1994 Rob Zatechka[17] Nebraska Chris Hatcher[17] Valdosta State
1995 Danny Wuerffel[18] Florida Chris Palmer[18] Saint John's (MN)
1996 Danny Wuerffel[19] Florida Lon Erickson[19] Illinois Wesleyan
1997 Peyton Manning[20] Tennessee Brad Gray[20] MIT
1998 Matt Stinchcomb[21] Georgia Corte McGuffey[21] Northern Colorado
1999 Chad Pennington[22] Marshall Corte McGuffey[22] Northern Colorado
2000 Drew Brees[23] Purdue Dave Wonderlick[23] Susquehanna
2001 Ryan Johnson[24] Montana State T.J. Hess[24] Widener
2002 Kliff Kingsbury[25] Texas Tech Mike Bowman[26] Susquehanna
2003 Craig Krenzel[27] Ohio State Tyler Paul[27] Emporia State
2004 Alex Smith[28] Utah Ty Touchstone[28] Eastern New Mexico
2005 Nick Hartigan[29] Brown Josh Lamberson [29] Northwest Missouri State
2006 Paul Posluszny[30] Penn State Ryan Meredith[30] Pittsburg State
2007 Brandon Cramer[31] Dayton Danny Woodhead[31] Chadron State
2008 Tim Tebow[32] Florida Greg Micheli[32] Mount Union
2009 Tim Tebow[33] Florida Beau Kildow[33] Morningside
2010 Greg McElroy[34] Alabama Isaac Odim[34] Minnesota–Duluth

Four-division era (2011–present)

Football Academic All-America Team Members of the Year (2011–present)
Year Div. I Winner School Div. II Winner School Div. III Winner School College/NAIA Winner[b] School
2011 Andrew Luck[6] Stanford Clay Garcia[35] Colorado Mines Michael Zweifel[36] Dubuque Jake Snodgrass[37] McPherson
2012 Barrett Jones[38] Alabama Dustin Vaughan[39] West Texas A&M Nick Driskill[40] Mount Union Jake Snodgrass[41] McPherson
2013 Gabe Ikard[42] Oklahoma Trent Adams[43] Northwest Missouri State John Arena[44] Johns Hopkins Lamont Wims[45] Robert Morris (IL)
2014 Zach Zenner[46] South Dakota State Kevin Rodgers[47] Henderson State Michael Bates[48] Illinois College Connor Zumpfe[49] Nebraska Wesleyan
2015 Carson Wentz[50] North Dakota State Jason Vander Laan[51] Ferris State Hank Spencer[52] Mount Union Logan Paben[53] Peru State
2016 Christian McCaffrey[54] Stanford Kyle Zimmerman[55] Northwest Missouri State Ryan Anderson[56] Olivet Logan Brettell[57] Baker
2017 Marlon Walls[58] Stephen F. Austin Ty Reasnor[59] Arkansas Tech Ugdam Goyal[60] MIT Gunnar Orcutt[61] Peru State
2018 Justin Herbert[62] Oregon Kirby Hora[63] Augustana (SD) Ugdam Goyal[64] MIT Trent Solsma[65] Morningside
2019 Justin Herbert[66] Oregon Brant Grisel[67] Charleston (WV) Matt Anderson[68] Wisconsin–Whitewater Hilton Joseph[69] Waldorf
2020–21[c] Mac Jones[70] Alabama Evan Ernst[71] Ohio Dominican Steven Sellers[72] Mary Hardin–Baylor Cameron Dukes[73] Lindsey Wilson
2021 Charlie Kolar[74] Iowa State Henry Litwin[75] Slippery Rock Matt Anderson[76] Grove City Cameron Dukes[77] Lindsey Wilson
2022 Will Levis[78] Kentucky John Matocha[78] Colorado Mines Cormac Madigan[78] Ripon Ryan Cole[78] Morningside
2023 Rome Odunze[79] Washington Nolan Reeve[79] Colorado Mines Owen Grover[79] Wartburg Jaden Meizinger[79] Keiser
Notes
  1. ^ Football awards are normally presented in the fall and overall awards in spring. The only exception to date was in 2020–21, when COVID-19 disruptions caused the announcement of the football awards to be delayed until summer 2021.
  2. ^ College Division, 2011–2017; NAIA, 2018–present
  3. ^ Officially designated as "2020–21" awards; Division I FBS played in fall 2020, while most teams at other levels either did not play at all or played in spring 2021.

Schools with multiple awards

School Awards
Florida 4[m 1]
MIT 4[m 2]
Alabama 3
Colorado Mine 3
Augustana (South Dakota) 3[m 3]
Morningside 3
Mount Union 3
Northwest Missouri State 3
Stanford 3
Arkansas Tech 2
Lindsey Wilson 2[m 4]
McPherson 2[m 4]
Oregon 2[m 4]
Peru State 2
Susquehanna 2
Valdosta State 2[m 4]

Other footnotes

  1. ^ Four awards won by two individuals.
  2. ^ Four awards won by three individuals.
  3. ^ Three awards won by two individuals.
  4. ^ a b c d Two awards won by the same individual.

References

  1. ^ a b "About the Academic All-America®Program" (Press release). College Sports Information Directors of America. November 27, 2017. Retrieved March 12, 2024.
  2. ^ a b "2021-22 Academic All-America® committee" (PDF). CoSIDA. 2021. Retrieved March 18, 2024.
  3. ^ "CoSIDA Strengthens Academic All-America® Awards Program with Significant Changes in 2022-23". College Sports Communicators. July 27, 2022. Retrieved March 15, 2024.
  4. ^ "Academic All-America program Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)" (PDF). College Sports Information Directors of America. Retrieved March 22, 2011.
  5. ^ "2022-23 Top 4 chosen for Overall Academic All-America® of the Year honors in NCAA and NAIA divisions" (Press release). College Sports Communicators. July 26, 2023. Retrieved September 26, 2023.
  6. ^ a b "Stanford quarterback Andrew Luck headlines the 2011 Capital One Academic All-America® Division I Football Team". College Sports Information Directors of America. December 8, 2011. Archived from the original on April 26, 2012. Retrieved December 8, 2011.
  7. ^ "Academic All-America®, selected by College Sports Communicators" (PDF). College Sports Communicators. January 31, 2024. Retrieved March 18, 2024.
  8. ^ a b c "Football Academic All-America® of the Year" (PDF). College Sports Communicators. 2023. Retrieved March 18, 2024.
  9. ^ "All-Time Academic All-America® Overall Team Member of the Year presented by College Sports Communicators" (PDF). College Sports Communicators. 2023. Retrieved March 18, 2023.
  10. ^ a b "1987 COSIDA ACADEMIC ALL-AMERICA FOOTBALL TEAM" (PDF). College Sports Information Directors of America. October 13, 2016. Retrieved May 5, 2024.
  11. ^ a b "1988 COSIDA ACADEMIC ALL-AMERICA FOOTBALL TEAM" (PDF). College Sports Information Directors of America. October 13, 2016. Retrieved May 5, 2024.
  12. ^ a b "1989 COSIDA ACADEMIC ALL-AMERICA FOOTBALL TEAM" (PDF). College Sports Information Directors of America. October 13, 2016. Retrieved May 5, 2024.
  13. ^ a b "1990 COSIDA ACADEMIC ALL-AMERICA FOOTBALL TEAM" (PDF). College Sports Information Directors of America. October 13, 2016. Retrieved May 5, 2024.
  14. ^ a b "1991 COSIDA ACADEMIC ALL-AMERICA FOOTBALL TEAM" (PDF). College Sports Information Directors of America. October 13, 2016. Retrieved May 5, 2024.
  15. ^ a b "1992 COSIDA ACADEMIC ALL-AMERICA FOOTBALL TEAM" (PDF). College Sports Information Directors of America. October 13, 2016. Retrieved May 5, 2024.
  16. ^ a b "1993 COSIDA ACADEMIC ALL-AMERICA FOOTBALL TEAM" (PDF). College Sports Information Directors of America. October 13, 2016. Retrieved May 5, 2024.
  17. ^ a b "1994 COSIDA ACADEMIC ALL-AMERICA FOOTBALL TEAM" (PDF). College Sports Information Directors of America. October 13, 2016. Retrieved May 5, 2024.
  18. ^ a b "1995 COSIDA ACADEMIC ALL-AMERICA FOOTBALL TEAM" (PDF). College Sports Information Directors of America. October 13, 2016. Retrieved May 5, 2024.
  19. ^ a b "1996 COSIDA ACADEMIC ALL-AMERICA FOOTBALL TEAM" (PDF). College Sports Information Directors of America. October 13, 2016. Retrieved May 5, 2024.
  20. ^ a b "1997 COSIDA ACADEMIC ALL-AMERICA FOOTBALL TEAM" (PDF). College Sports Information Directors of America. October 13, 2016. Retrieved May 5, 2024.
  21. ^ a b "1998 COSIDA ACADEMIC ALL-AMERICA FOOTBALL TEAM" (PDF). College Sports Information Directors of America. October 13, 2016. Retrieved May 5, 2024.
  22. ^ a b "1999 COSIDA ACADEMIC ALL-AMERICA FOOTBALL TEAM" (PDF). College Sports Information Directors of America. October 13, 2016. Retrieved May 5, 2024.
  23. ^ a b "2000 COSIDA ACADEMIC ALL-AMERICA FOOTBALL TEAM" (PDF). College Sports Information Directors of America. October 13, 2016. Retrieved May 5, 2024.
  24. ^ a b "2001 COSIDA ACADEMIC ALL-AMERICA FOOTBALL TEAM" (PDF). College Sports Information Directors of America. October 13, 2016. Retrieved May 5, 2024.
  25. ^ "Thirteen Student-Athletes Earn Repeat Verizon Academic All-America® Football Team Honors" (PDF). College Sports Information Directors of America. December 2, 2002. Retrieved March 23, 2011.
  26. ^ "2002-2003 VERIZON ACADEMIC ALL-AMERICA® FOOTBALL TEAM (COLLEGE DIVISION)" (PDF). College Sports Information Directors of America. December 2, 2002. Retrieved March 23, 2011.
  27. ^ a b "2003 Academic All-America® Football Team Announced" (PDF). College Sports Information Directors of America. Retrieved March 23, 2011.
  28. ^ a b "Utah's Smith & Eastern New Mexico's Touchstone Head: 2004 ESPN The Magazine Academic All-America® Football Team" (PDF). College Sports Information Directors of America. December 1, 2004. Retrieved March 23, 2011.
  29. ^ a b "Brown's Hartigan, Northwest Missouri State's Lamberson Head: 2005 ESPN the Magazine Academic All-America® Football Teams" (PDF). College Sports Information Directors of America. December 1, 2005. Retrieved March 23, 2011.
  30. ^ a b "Penn State's Posluszny and Pittsburgh State's Meredith Head: 2006 ESPN The Magazine Academic All-America Football Teams" (PDF) (Press release). College Sports Information Directors of America. November 30, 2006. Retrieved March 23, 2011.
  31. ^ a b "2007 ESPN The Magazine Academic All-America® Football Team" (PDF). College Sports Information Directors of America. Retrieved March 23, 2011.
  32. ^ a b "2008 ESPN The Magazine Academic All-America" (PDF). College Sports Information Directors of America. Retrieved March 23, 2011.
  33. ^ a b "2009-2010 ESPN The Magazine Sport-By-Sport Academic All-Americans Of The Year" (PDF). College Sports Information Directors of America. Retrieved March 23, 2011.
  34. ^ a b "Alabama quarterback Greg McElroy, Minnesota Duluth running back Isaac Odim lead ESPN Academic All-America® Football Teams". College Sports Information Directors of America. November 23, 2010. Archived from the original on September 29, 2011. Retrieved March 23, 2011.
  35. ^ "Clay Garcia of Colorado School of Mines named top scholar-athlete on Capital One Academic All-America® Division II Football Team". College Sports Information Directors of America. December 7, 2011. Archived from the original on July 13, 2012. Retrieved May 5, 2024.
  36. ^ "Record-setting senior wide receiver Michael Zweifel (University of Dubuque) leads Capital One Academic All-America® Division III Football Team; Zweifel named AAA of the Year for DIII football". College Sports Information Directors of America. December 6, 2011. Archived from the original on July 13, 2012. Retrieved May 5, 2024.
  37. ^ "Jake Snodgrass of McPherson leads Capital One Academic All-America® College Division Football Team". College Sports Information Directors of America. December 5, 2011. Archived from the original on July 13, 2012. Retrieved May 5, 2024.
  38. ^ "Alabama's Barrett Jones tops Capital One Academic All-America® Division I Football Team". College Sports Information Directors of America. December 6, 2012. Archived from the original on January 10, 2013. Retrieved December 6, 2012.
  39. ^ "Quarterback Dustin Vaughan of West Texas A&M tops Capital One Academic All-America® Division II Football Team". College Sports Information Directors of America. December 5, 2012. Archived from the original on April 7, 2013. Retrieved May 5, 2024.
  40. ^ "Mount Union defensive back Nick Driskill leads Capital One Academic All-America® Division III Football Team". College Sports Information Directors of America. December 4, 2012. Archived from the original on April 7, 2013. Retrieved May 5, 2024.
  41. ^ "McPherson College quarterback Jake Snodgrass leads Capital One Academic All-America College Division Football Teams; Snodgrass repeats as divisional AAA of the Year". College Sports Information Directors of America. December 3, 2012. Archived from the original on April 7, 2013. Retrieved May 5, 2024.
  42. ^ "Alabama's Jacob crowned Capital One Division I Academic All-America of the Year" (Press release). College Sports Information Directors of America. July 31, 2014. Retrieved December 16, 2014.
  43. ^ "Bentley's Battista named Capital One D2 Academic All-America® of the Year" (Press release). College Sports Information Directors of America. July 30, 2014. Retrieved December 16, 2014.
  44. ^ "Cazzola named Capital One Academic D3 All-America® of the Year" (Press release). College Sports Information Directors of America. July 29, 2014. Retrieved December 16, 2014.
  45. ^ "Lunney Named Top Capital One Academic All-America® honoree in College Division" (Press release). College Sports Information Directors of America. July 28, 2014. Retrieved December 16, 2014.
  46. ^ "Capital One Academic All-America® D1 Football Team Selected" (Press release). College Sports Information Directors of America. December 4, 2014. Retrieved December 16, 2014.
  47. ^ "Meet the Capital One Academic All-America® D2 Football Team" (Press release). College Sports Information Directors of America. December 3, 2014. Retrieved December 16, 2014.
  48. ^ "Capital One Academic All-America® D3 Football Team Announced" (Press release). College Sports Information Directors of America. December 2, 2014. Retrieved December 16, 2014.
  49. ^ "Meet the Capital One Academic All-America® College Div. Football Team" (Press release). College Sports Information Directors of America. December 1, 2014. Retrieved December 16, 2014.
  50. ^ "CoSIDA Academic All-America® Division I Football Selected" (Press release). College Sports Information Directors of America. December 3, 2015.
  51. ^ "Academic All-America® Football Teams - Division II" (Press release). College Sports Information Directors of America. December 2, 2014.
  52. ^ "Academic All-America® Football Teams - Division III". College Sports Information Directors of America. December 1, 2015.
  53. ^ "Academic All-America® Football Teams - College Division". College Sports Information Directors of America. November 30, 2015.
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  55. ^ "KYLE ZIMMERMAN OF NORTHWEST MISSOURI STATE LEADS CoSIDA ACADEMIC ALL-AMERICA® DIVISION II FOOTBALL TEAM" (PDF). College Sports Information Directors of America. November 30, 2016. Retrieved May 5, 2024.
  56. ^ "RYAN ANDERSON OF OLIVET TOPS CoSIDA ACADEMIC ALL-AMERICA® DIVISION III FOOTBALL TEAM" (PDF). College Sports Information Directors of America. November 29, 2016. Retrieved May 5, 2024.
  57. ^ "LOGAN BRETTELL OF BAKER LEADS CoSIDA ACADEMIC ALLAMERICA® COLLEGE DIVISION FOOTBALL TEAM" (PDF). College Sports Information Directors of America. November 28, 2016. Retrieved May 5, 2024.
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  60. ^ "MIT's Ugdam Goyal Headlines CoSIDA Academic All-America® Division III Football Team" (PDF) (Press release). College Sports Information Directors of America. December 13, 2017. Retrieved December 27, 2017.
  61. ^ "Gunnar Orcutt of Peru State Headlines CoSIDA Academic All-America® College Division Football Teams" (PDF) (Press release). College Sports Information Directors of America. December 11, 2017. Retrieved December 27, 2017.
  62. ^ "Justin Herbert of Oregon Headlines Google Cloud Academic All-America® Division I Football Team" (PDF) (Press release). College Sports Information Directors of America. December 10, 2018. Retrieved January 27, 2019.
  63. ^ "Kirby Hora of Augustana (S.D.) Headlines Google Cloud Academic All-America® Division II Football Teams" (PDF) (Press release). College Sports Information Directors of America. December 11, 2018. Retrieved January 27, 2019.
  64. ^ "MIT's Ugdam Goyal Headlines Google Cloud Academic All-America® Division III Football Teams" (PDF) (Press release). College Sports Information Directors of America. December 12, 2018. Retrieved January 27, 2019.
  65. ^ "Trent Solsma of Morningside Headlines Google Cloud Academic All-America® College Division Football Teams" (PDF) (Press release). College Sports Information Directors of America. December 13, 2018. Retrieved January 27, 2019.
  66. ^ "2019 Academic All-America® NCAA Division I Football Teams Announced" (Press release). College Sports Information Directors of America. December 9, 2019. Retrieved December 10, 2019.
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  69. ^ "2019 CoSIDA Academic All-America® NAIA Football Team Announced" (Press release). College Sports Information Directors of America. December 12, 2019. Retrieved December 16, 2019.
  70. ^ "2020–21 Academic All-America® NCAA Division I Football Teams Announced" (Press release). College Sports Information Directors of America. July 12, 2021. Retrieved August 20, 2021.
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