Cosplay of Marika Katou in Bodacious Space Pirates at 2013 Cosplay Mart
Cosplay of Marika Katou in Bodacious Space Pirates at 2013 Cosplay Mart

Space pirates are a type of stock character from space opera and soft science fiction.[1] The archetype evolved from the air pirate trope popular from the turn of the century until the 1920s. By the 1930s, space pirates were recurring villains in the Buck Rogers comic strip. Like historical sea pirates, space pirates may be involved in slaving or smuggling in addition to raiding spacecraft and settlements.

The names are organized alphabetically by surname, or by single name if the character does not have a surname. If more than two characters are in one entry, the last name of the first character is used.

Animation

Name Work Duration Description
Amsaja Cleopatra in Space 2020–present The self-declared "Queen of the Space Pirates," who heads a crew of three other pirates (Ostea, Cyborg Dwayne, and Boop), and the doppelgänger of series protagonist, Cleopatra.[2] She previously had the telepathic space shark ninja as her ex-boyfriend, and the series villain, Octavian, might be her ex-boyfriend as well.
Atomsk FLCL 2000-2001 Pirate King in this OVA, who also appears in the manga, and two anime series, FLCL Progressive and FLCL Alternative.[3]
Ryoko Balta Tenchi Muyo! GXP 2002 Although she named herself after Ryoko Hakubi,[4] Balta is hardly as bloodthirsty as that infamous space pirate was rumored to be, although she is notorious.[5] Even though she was a member of the dreaded Daluma pirate guild, Ryoko Balta is an educated and cultured pirate.[6][7] She is well-versed in many customs from other planets, including the Japanese Tea Ceremony.
Lars Barriga Steven Universe
Steven Universe Future
2013-2019
2019-2020
A human who died on the Gem Homeworld and was resurrected by Steven, later becoming the captain of a group of fugitive gems on a stolen spaceship. He has been described as "complicated fellow" by his voice actor, Matthew Moy,[8] and was designed by series creator Rebecca Sugar when she was in college.[9] Some have said that the outfit Lars wears is reminiscent of Captain Harlock.[10]
Boop Cleopatra in Space 2020–present She is a doppelgänger of Mihos, Cleo's animal companion.[2] She is on the pirate ship along with Cyborg Dwayne, Amsaja, and Ostea. His attack cry is just saying her name over and over.
Brak Space Ghost
Space Ghost Coast to Coast
1966-1967
1994-2008
A supervillain who is portrayed as a catlike alien space pirate trying to conquer the galaxy. Cartoon Network described him as having "meager wits and the love of a peppy tune."[11]
Captain Cracker ThunderCats
ThunderCats Roar
1985-1989
2020–present
A robotic space pirate who has a robot parrot which sits on his shoulder.[12]
Cyborg Dwayne Cleopatra in Space 2020–present The doppelgänger of protagonist Brian Bell who is also on the pirate ship with Ostea, Boop, and Amsaja.[2]
Spectre
Gabbro
Foolscap
Shear
Goma
Ancient Ruler Dinosaur King DKidz Adventure 2007-2008 Spectre, Gabbro, Foolscap, Shear, and Goma are members of the “Spectral Space Pirates” and collect cosmos stones throughout time.[13][14]
Hammerhand ThunderCats
ThunderCats Roar
1985-1989
2020–present
The leader of the Berserkers who has a cybernetic arm that can punch and pound with great force.[12] After he and his original Berserkers were killed, Hammerhand was later mystically resurrected by Mumm-Ra who summoned up his spirit to animate a clone of Panthro which he had created. When the plan failed, Hammerhand's spirit broke Mumm-Ra's control and the clone body shifted into Hammerhand's original form before departing. Other Berserkers are Topspinner, Ram Bam, and Cruncher, all of whom are "gold-loving" pirates and all cyborgs.[15][16]
Captain Harlock Space Pirate Captain Harlock 1978-1979 Captain of the Arcadia. The character was created by Leiji Matsumoto in 1977 and popularized in the 1978 television series Space Pirate Captain Harlock.[17] Since then, the character has appeared in numerous animated television series and films, like Arcadia of My Youth, the latest of which is 2013's Space Pirate Captain Harlock. Harlock has achieved notable popularity. Several anime and manga characters have been, in some way, inspired by Matsumoto's creation. Naoko Takeuchi drew inspiration from Harlock's stoic qualities ("strong, silent, unshakeable") when designing the character of Tuxedo Mask,[18] while Last Exile's Alex Row was modeled after the Captain.[19] His basic character design is even thought to be a source of inspiration for Osamu Tezuka's manga character Black Jack.
Marika Kato Bodacious Space Pirates[a] 2012 In the far future where space travel is the norm, Marika Kato, born and raised in the Tau Ceti planet Morningstar, is the newly recruited teenage captain of the space pirate ship Bentenmaru, inheriting the title from her deceased father.[20] Apart from the anime series, she appeared in the manga series of the same name, and the 2014 film, Bodacious Space Pirates: Abyss of Hyperspace.[21]
Ririka Kato Bodacious Space Pirates 2012 She is the mother of Marika, the captain of the Bentenmaru, and wife of Gonzaemon Kato (otherwise known as Captain Ironbeard), the captain of the Parabellum pirate ship, and was once a space pirate known as "Blaster Ririka".[20] Sometime after Marika becomes the captain of the Bentenmaru, she joins the crew of the Parabellum.
Duelo McFile Vandread 2000-2001 Duelo quickly takes over medical emergencies often at the objection of the female pirates, but ignores them, assuring the crew members that he is not a threat. Since he is the only licensed medical practitioner on board the Nirvana, as well as being that the medical facilities on board the female pirate ship were no longer operational, the female pirates were left with no choice but to have him as their official doctor.[22]
Mito Space Pirate Mito 1999 Mito masquerades as a fashion model, but is actually a legendary space pirate.[23]
Hondo Ohnaka Star Wars: The Clone Wars
Star Wars Rebels
2008-2020
2014-2018
Leader of the Weequay space pirates,[b] known as the Ohnaka Gang, which kidnaps, and attempts to ransom, Obi-Wan Kenobi, Anakin Skywalker, Count Dooku—and later Ahsoka Tano—to the highest bidder during the Clone Wars.[24] He follows a code of honor and respects the Jedi, but is not above using sneaky tactics and treachery if it is for "good business". Years after the Clone Wars, despite losing his crew to the Galactic Empire, Hondo continues his criminal activities while having dealings with the Rebellion crew of the Ghost.[25] He also rebuilt the Slave I ship, which Boba Fett took control of following his father's death, and Boba Fett kept it for years onward.[26]
Orions Star Trek: The Animated Series 1973-1974 The first appearance of a male Orion was shown in the Star Trek: The Animated Series episode "The Pirates of Orion".[27] In the episode, these Orions are shown to be ruthless pirates,[28] As such, some recommended this episode for featuring the trio of characters Kirk, Spock, and Bones of The Original Series.[29] Later, the Orion Syndicate was mentioned in Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, but no actual Orions were seen, only members of other species.[30]
Ostea Cleopatra in Space 2020–present A doppelgänger of series protagonist Akila Theoris, she is a pirate in the same crew as Cyborg Dwayne and Amsaja.[2] She is a pirate who apparently edits, or a major contributor, to a newsletter for space pirates.
Black Patch Colonel Bleep 1957-1960 Part of the titular colonel's intergalactic rogues' gallery[31] in this first color cartoon series made for television.[32]
Pirate Clans Exosquad 1993-1994 In the first season of this series, a group of humans defend their homeworlds from attack when under attack from these rogue pirates and humanoids,[33] a theme which continues in season 2.[34]
Sinbad and the Space Pirates Challenge of the Super Friends 1978 Space pirates come to Earth to loot its treasure in the second part of episode 4.[35]
Herc Starsailor Jayce and the Wheeled Warriors 1985-86 A pirate, mercenary and captain of the space barge Pride of the Skies.[36]
Magno Vivan Vandread 2000-2001 The commander of the pirates and everyone addresses her as Boss (Okashira in the Japanese version, which was translated as "captain").[37] She sees her crew as her children and she hold them in high esteem, also she hold a picture of any of the crew who have left/died displayed when Gascogne apparently dies and she places her picture inside the cabinet.

Comics and manga

Name Work Duration Description
Abslom Daak Doctor Who 1963-1989
2005–present
Ex-convict, pirate and mercenary hired by the Time Lords to destroy Daleks in this comic, also appearing in the Deceit novel in 1993, traveling across the galaxy on his starship which is named the "Kill-Wagon."[38][39]
Black Barney Buck Rogers in the 25th Century A.D. 1929-1967 In this comic strip, Barney begins as a space pirate and later becomes a friend of Buck Rogers.[40][41]
Cobra Cobra 1978-1984 Appearing in this manga, then later in a film, anime, original video animation, Cobra is a notorious rogue pirate who refuses to align with a federation of star systems or a guild of pirates, meaning that he has to keep his identity hidden.[42] In the process, he teams up with Jane, a bounty hunter who is trying to find her sisters, with their goal to liberate a treasure from the planet of Mars.
Queen Emeraldas Queen Emeraldas
Galaxy Express 999
Space Pirate Captain Harlock
1978-1979
1977-1981
1977-1979
Spinoff character from Galaxy Express 999[c] and Capt. Harlock in Leiji Matsumoto universe. Sister of Maetel from GE999. In the manga, ahe comforts the series protagonist, Hiroshi Umino, who escapes Earth on a freighter,[43] and is fascinated by him, as she fled Earth in the past to a ship which she designed herself.[44]

Addiionally, Emeraldas shows up in the animate films Galaxy Express 999 (1977) and Space Battleship Yamato (1974).

Ironwolf Weird Worlds 1972-1974
2011
Antihero resisting the tyrannical Empress Hernandez. He first appeared in the last three issues of Weird Worlds, a comics anthology series published by American company DC Comics from 1972 to 1974.[45] and was created by Howard Chaykin, who plotted and drew the stories.[46]
Boris Jorgen Explorers on the Moon 1953-59 The disgraced former aide to the King of Syldavia who attempts to steal Professor Calculus' rocket for the Stalinist regime of Borduria, and abandon Captain Haddock and the Thompsons on the moon.[47]
Killer Kane Buck Rogers in the 25th Century A.D. 1929-1967 Flamboyant 25th century crime boss, later dictator of earth and Saturn, with a fleet of spacecraft and raygun-toting henchmen who appeared in the Buck Rogers comic strip and its subsequent 1939 Buck Rogers serial film produced by Universal Studios,[48][49] the 1979 film and subsequent TV series. Some reviewers believe that when measured against other serial villains such as Ming the Merciless, Killer Kane pales somewhat in comparison.[50]
Jonathan Rockhal Nathan Never 1991–present A space pirate captain. John Silver, whose name was inspired by Long John Silver, a man with a mechanical leg, is his second-in-command, who appeared in these comics.[51] Before they turned to piracy, they were generals of the Federal Army of Earth. Also in the comic series is a former space pirate named Madoc, a friend of Rebecca "Legs" Weaver, a colleague of the protagonist.[52]
Kaguyo Ryuutsugi Space Pirate (manga series) 2019–present The blue-haired, arrogant and often impatient main character of the Space Pirate manga series. A known criminal among the Blue Sun Empire and son of the late Omega Pirate.
Starjammers Uncanny X-Men 1963-2019 A team of space pirates, led by Corsair, appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics.[53] The Starjammers first appeared in Uncanny X-Men #107 (October 1977) and were created by Dave Cockrum.[54] The name "Starjammers" was created on the basis of the type of sailing ship known as "Windjammer".
Elon Cody Starbuck Star Reach 1974-1979 In this 1970s comic,[55] Starbuck is a "rollicking space pirate" and swashbuckler who was sometimes a hero, and other times a villain who has some redeeming qualities.[56][57][58] Some have also said that Lieutenant Starbuck in Battlestar Galactica was based on Starbuck in this comic series.[59]
The Star Pirate Planet Comics 1940-1953 Called the "Robin Hood of the space lanes," looked very much like the DC Comics hero Starman, and appeared between issues #12 and #64. Among several artists, George Appel produced a dozen early issues, while the bulk of issues #33-51 were drawn by Murphy Anderson, whose additions transformed the Pirate into "an almost completely new strip."[60] Three late issues (#59-61) are credited to newspaper comic strip artist Leonard Starr.[61][60]
Yondu Marvel Super-Heroes
Guardians 3000
1967-1982
2014
Blue skinned space pirate and mercenary, mentor to Star-Lord in this comic book and later film. The Earth-616 version of Yondu has been identified by writer Sam Humphries as "the great, great, great, great, great, great, great grandfather of the Yondu in the original Guardians of the Galaxy and Guardians 3000."[62] On this Earth, Yondu is the leader of The Ravagers, a group of Space Pirates. Yondu finds Peter Quill when his ship malfunctions and strands him on Earth.[63] The Ravagers rescue him as Peter tries to steal his ship, managing to outsmart every member of the crew and capturing Yondu. After Yondu frees himself from his restraints and attacks Peter, he gives him a choice between letting himself be released into space without more trouble or execution. Peter instead asks to join his crew. Yondu is initially skeptical of this idea, but after he learns Peter, like him, is a homeless orphan, Yondu allows him to stay on the ship with the Ravagers as their cleaning boy. Peter uses the opportunity to learn everything he can from space.[64] Later, Yondu makes him an official Ravager.[65]

Film

Name Work Year Description
Dagg Dibrim Starchaser: The Legend of Orin 1985 In this space opera and animated film,[66] Dagg is a pirate, crystal smuggler, and sidekick to the protagonist.[67][68][69][70] Some have said he "resembles Burt Reynolds but behaves like Harrison Ford's Han Solo."[71]
Brock Donnelly Max Cloud[d] 2020 In this film by director Martin Owen, Brock Donnelly is a space pirate with confusing motives, arriving suddenly in the story and often changing is allegiances.[72]
Captain CJ "Hawk" Hawkens Space Raiders 1983 Roguish protagonist and space pirate in this space opera, which is Roger Corman's dark spin on Star Wars.[73][74]
Tex Hex BraveStarr: The Movie 1988 This animated Space Western, based on the animated series of the same name, has an evil purple-skinned outlaw, minion to the demon Stampede.[75]
The Hood Thunderbirds Are Go 1966 Telepathic criminal mastermind who attempts to hijack the Zero-X spacecraft.
Nabel Space Truckers 1996 A scientist who is later revealed to be a pirate captain of the Regalia named Macanudo, who rebuilt his grievously injured body and went into piracy as revenge against Saggs for betraying him.[76][77]
Richard B. Riddick The Chronicles of Riddick 2004 Escaped convict and last of the alien Furian race.[78] Riddick was once a mercenary, then part of a security force,[79] and later a soldier and ruler of the Necromongers.
Han Solo Star Wars: Episode IV – A New Hope 1977 A pirate,[80] mercenary and spice smuggler, best friend to the dog-like alien Chewbacca and lover to Princess Leia.[81] In designing Solo, George Lucas used Humphrey Bogart as a point of reference, with Solo developing into a "tough James Dean style starpilot" that would appear in the finished film.[82] After his appearance in a New Hope, he also appeared in Star Wars: Episode V – The Empire Strikes Back in 1980, Star Wars: Episode VI – Return of the Jedi in 1983, Star Wars: The Force Awakens in 2015, Solo: A Star Wars Story in 2018, and Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker in 2019, along with in the Star Wars Holiday Special, the Star Wars Forces of Destiny series, and many other parts of the Star Wars franchise.
Mark Watney The Martian[e] 2015 Watney, a botanist,[83] notes with some glee that his plan to commandeer a NASA lander without explicit permission, as part of his rescue from being stranded on Mars, under his interpretation of applicable laws means that he is history's first "space pirate": citing that due to the Outer Space Treaty Mars is considered international territory, and citing that under the Law of the Sea, he is essentially hijacking a vessel without permission in international waters, "which, by definition, makes me a pirate." Other analysts have argued that he technically wasn't committing an act of piracy, however, due to the facts that 1 - it has not yet been explicitly established if the same laws for international waters apply to international territory such as Mars or Antarctica, 2 - "Piracy" explicitly refers to robbery by force from a crew, not "theft" of an uncrewed vessel as Watney did, and 3 - under space law, the vessel Watney was stealing would be considered U.S. territory and NASA property, and Watney was already a U.S. NASA astronaut.[84]

Literature

Name Work Release Date Description
Angelina Stainless Steel Rat 1961-2010 Criminal mastermind with a powerful space battleship who becomes Jim's lover.[85]
Boskone Lensman 1948-1954 Galactic-wide pirate organization.[86] in this influential space opera.[87]
Bull Coxine Tom Corbett, Space Cadet 1952-1956 Pirate who in 2353 led a breakout from the Solar Alliance prison asteroid and proceeded to prey upon various spacecraft until Tom Corbett and his unit mates Roger Manning and Astro defeated him.[88][89]
Murdoch Juan "The Pirate" 1968 A bold space adventurer in this story, which is part of The Psychotechnic League series.[90] Whether Murdoch is to be actually defined as a pirate, or rather as a very daring but legitimate entrepreneur, is a major issue on which the whole story turns. In another one of his stories, the pirates are desperate to destroy the protagonist "before he can bring the information to the authorities."[91]
Drongo Kane John Grimes novels 1967-1976 A pirate captain who is the villain in several books,[92][93][94] comes from the planet Austral, and other books mention the planet Australis in another part of the galaxy.[95] His story "The Mountain Movers" (part of Grimes' early career) includes the song of future Australian space adventurers, sung to the tune of "Waltzing Matilda." The Duchy of Waldegren is also a popular haunt of several notorious space-pirates (no individual names given) in the series.
Talon Karrde Thrawn trilogy 1991-1993 Karrde is a smuggler chief who becomes the leader of the criminal underworld after the death of Jabba Desilijic Tiure.[96] The author of the trilogy, Timothy Zahn, said that when he created the character he "always envisioned the face and voice of Avon" from Blake's Seven.[97]
Kraiklyn Consider Phlebas 1987 Captain of the pirate ship Clear Air Turbulence, an avid gambler who leads his crew on two disastrous raids before being killed by the main character Horza.[98][99][100]
Krys and Jolly U Alisa Selezneva 1965-2003 Krys is a shape-shifter, and Jolly U is a fat humanoid. They appear as Alisa's antagonists in several books and their adaptations, such as The Mystery of the Third Planet[101] and Guest from the Future.
Manjanungo Race Across the Stars 1982-1984 A bloodthirsty space pirate in this novel, which is part of the Spaceways series.[102]
Carson Napier Venus Series 1932-1962 A dashing space-traveler, got to Venus by mistake, discovered there a tyrannical regime which sorely needed opposing - and the best way to do that was to assume leadership of the Pirates of Venus (also the title of the first book in the Venus series).[103][104]
Red Peri The Red Peri 1935 Peri is the novel's protagonist and space pirate who has a base on the Moon.[105] Additionally, some said that "the background is imaginative, but the romance is on the level of the shopgirl pulps, and the writing leaves much to be desired,"[106] with David Bowman's helmetless spacewalk in 2001: A Space Odyssey inspired by Frank Keene's escape from the pirate base the novel.[107]
Garris Shrike Han Solo Trilogy 1997-1998 Space pirate, con artist, and mercenary who captured Han Solo as a child, turning him into a thief, while serving as his mentor.[108][109] A similar character, named Tobias Beckett appeared in the Solo: A Star Wars Story film.[110]
Star Seekers Transformers: Exiles
Transformers: Retribution
2011
2014
Transformer Pirates with a vendetta against Cybertron led by Thundertron, even appearing in the 2014 storyline for BotCon.[111] Thundertron also appeared as a figure in the Transformers: Prime toyline. Reportedly, Transformers Prime would have introduced pirates if it has continued.[112] Also, there was the Dread Pirate Crew which appeared in Transformers: Wings Universe, a universe based on the original cartoon, depicted in comics, and prose stories.[113]
Booster Terrik X-Wing 1996-2012 Terrik was a criminal who was imprisoned by protagonist Corran Horn's father, as well as an old friend of another protagonist Wedge Antilles.[114][115] Later in the series, Horn marries Terrik's daughter Mirax, despite Terrik's initial objections.
Gammis Turek Vatta's War 2003-2008 Formerly a little-known gang boss based out of Woosten, though thanks to time and planning he becomes leader of the biggest pirate organization in the history of the universe, as shown in the last three novels of the series, Engaging the Enemy (2006)[116] and Command Decision (2007).[117]
Unnamed Barbary Station 2017 A pair of engineers join a group of space pirates but the engineers work to "take down a sinister AI" so they can gain the trust of the crew.[118]

Live-action television

Name Work Duration Description
Space Pirate Alien Barossa Ultraman Z 2020 They are a race of pirates born in a clutches of 10,000. They made their reputation by stealing weapons from their defeated opponents. Prior to the series, Ultraman Zero encountered a Barossa that fought using trickery. The Barossas are designed by Kengo Kusunoki as an alien that will represent the Reiwa era of Japan[119] and are villains in the series.[120][121][122]
Roj Blake Blake's Seven 1978-81 Blake is a political dissident and captain of the spaceship Liberator who leads his crew of thieves, freedom fighters and smugglers against the evil Terran Federation.[123]
John Crichton Farscape 1999-2007 An astronaut from Earth who travels to a distant galaxy through a wormhole and joins the space pirate crew of the sentient starship Moya.
Divatox Power Rangers Turbo 1997 In this series, Divatox is an intergalactic space pirate and villain.[124] In the 1997 film, she is seeking his golden key to traverse an inter-dimensional gateway and enter into matrimony with Maligore, an imprisoned demon who promises her great riches and power.[125]
Tylon Gershom Space Precinct 1994-95 A smuggler of alien refugees who murders Lt. Brogan's informant on the planet Altor.[126]
Gokaigers Kaizoku Sentai Gokaiger 2011-2012 Characters from a Super Sentai series who travel to Earth in search of the "Greatest Treasure in the Universe", only to be dragged into a battle with an invading alien force called the Space Empire Zangyack.[127]
Malcolm "Mal" Reynolds Firefly 2002 Former rebel Browncoat soldier and captain of Serenity, who has been described as someone that is "everything that a hero is not."[128] He is a survivor who tries to stay alive and get by,[129] raised by his mother and "about 40 hands" on a ranch on the planet Shadow.[130] He occasionally surprises his friends by displaying familiarity with disparate literature varying from the works of Xiang Yu[131] to poems[132] by Samuel Taylor Coleridge, though he has no idea "who" Mona Lisa is.
Thadiun Okona Star Trek: The Next Generation 1987-94 In this sci-fi retelling of Romeo and Juliet, Okona is a Han Solo-like thief and smuggler who ends a long-running feud between two powerful families by transporting a valuable ancestral jewel to princess Yanar of Altia on behalf of his best friend Benzan of Thesia.[133]
Camina Drummer The Expanse 2015-2022 In the fifth and sixth seasons of the show, Camina Drummer (formerly head of security at Tycho Space Station) joins a commune of space pirates using the ships Dewalt, Mowtang, and Tynan.
Klaus Ashford The Expanse 2015-2022 Before the events of the series, Klaus Ashford was the captain of the Tynan, a pirate ship. Eventually he leaves this lifestyle, and the Tynan is used to stop space pirates for the OPA. Eventually the ship becomes a pirate ship again, this time under captain Camina Drummer.
Saffron Firefly 2002 She is a very crafty and amoral con artist who assumes convenient identities to commit grand thefts, is known to seduce—and frequently marry, and an occasional ship thief.[134]
Alonzo P. Tucker Lost in Space 1965-1968 Inspired by Long John Silver, especially as portrayed by Robert Newton in this series, which was "aimed primarily at children."[135] He is introduced in the episode "The Sky Pirate" as a human rogue of sorts,[136][137][138] and is clearly defined as a space pirate by TV Guide.[139]

Music

Name Work Release

Date

Description
Blondie Tide Is High 1980 In the music video, Blondie and her group board a rocketship, collide with a flying saucer, and confront an alien resembling Darth Vader.
GWAR Scumdogs of the Universe 1990 Alien space pirates unleash a reign of terror on Earth.[140]
The Mechanisms The Mechanisms 2010-2020 A "band of immortal space pirates, roaming the universe on the Starship Aurora".[141] Nine members at their peak, all with one or more mechanical body parts[142]- made by the vampire Doctor Carmilla, who they eventually threw out of an airlock[143]- the Mechanisms tell stories of the people they've met through their eons in the stars; often science fiction or steampunk reworkings of mythologies or classic works.[144] They have a penchant for violence and crime- a police officer notes that first mate Jonny d'Ville has "literally committed every crime we have a name for".[145] Their final album, Death to the Mechanisms, marks their end, both in and out of character.[146]

Video games

Name Work Release Date Description
Black Sun Pirates Star Wars: Empire at War 2006 This game contains a non-playable faction called the Black Sun Pirates, who are a large gang of mercenaries.[147] In addition, during the Clone Wars, the criminal elements which comprised the Black Sun syndicate flourished, and it was led by a "cabal of Falleen nobles" on Mustafar,[148][149] appearing in the series Star Wars: The Clone Wars.[150] and in a comic book series.[151]
Captain Blackbeard Megaman Battle Network 6 2005-2006 This game includes a WWW member named Captain Blackbeard, an operator of Diveman.EXE who dressed as a sailor.[152] He is also known as Captain Kurohige in Japan.
The Bonne Family Mega Man Legends 1997-1998 This video game consists of Teisel,[153] Tron, Bon, and 40 Servbots.[154][155] and the youngest brother, Bon Bonne, who can only say one word—"Babu!" The Bonnes are accompanied by forty Servbots, robots under the care of Tron.[156] They are air pirates in their own series, only being space pirates in the crossovers Namco × Capcom[157] and Project X Zone.[158]
Jackals Halo 2 2004 A sci-fi race of reptilian-like creatures who are notorious for piracy in space in this video game.[159]
Ridley Metroid 1986-2017 A dragon-like alien that is a top ranking member of the space pirates.[160]
Sally Fallout 3 2008-2009 A child victim of alien abduction who helps the Vault Dweller take over Mothership Zeta, destroy an enemy flying saucer, and plunder the aliens' advanced technology.[161] The rest of her crew include the samurai Toshiro Kago, the mercenary Somah, doctor Elliot Tecorian, and the cowboy Paulson.
Space Pirates Kid Icarus: Uprising 2012 Futuristic, seemingly mechanical beings, and antagonists.[162] They act as enemies of Pit and the Underworld Army where they roam the Galactic Sea and steal the constellations. Besides the generic Space Pirates,[163] among the members of the Space Pirates are the Space Pirate Captain, Space Pirate Commando, and Space Pirate Sniper. They are reportedly called "Star Thieves" in Japan.

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Also known as Miniskirt Space Pirates
  2. ^ He was also called a "sassy space pirate" by Robert Nairne, who voiced him in a Disneyland display.
  3. ^ First a manga, then an anime, and OVA, along with several films.
  4. ^ Also called The Intergalactic Adventures of Max Cloud
  5. ^ Also a book of the same name

References

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  2. ^ a b c d "Pirates". Cleopatra in Space. Season 1. Episode 23. August 24, 2020. ABC ME.
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