Gizmodo
Type of site
Design, technology, science, science fiction, blog
Available inEnglish, French, Dutch, Italian, German, Spanish, Japanese, Polish, Portuguese
Country of originUnited States
OwnerG/O Media
Created byPeter Rojas
EditorDavid M. Ewalt[1]
URLgizmodo.com
CommercialYes
RegistrationOptional
LaunchedJuly 1, 2002; 21 years ago (2002-07-01)[2]

Gizmodo (/ɡɪzˈmd/ giz-MOH-doh) is a design, technology, science and science fiction website. It was originally launched as part of the Gawker Media network run by Nick Denton, and runs on the Kinja platform. Gizmodo also includes the sub-blogs io9 and Earther, which focus on pop-culture and environmentalism respectively. Since April 2019, Gizmodo is part of G/O Media, owned by private equity firm Great Hill Partners.[3]

History

The blog, launched in 2002, was originally edited by Peter Rojas, who was later recruited by Weblogs, Inc. to launch their similar technology blog, Engadget.[citation needed] By mid-2004, Gizmodo and Gawker together were bringing in revenue of approximately $6,500 per month.[4]

Gizmodo then launched in other locations:

In February 2011, Gizmodo underwent a major redesign.[11]

In 2013, Matt Novak moved his Paleofuture blog to Gizmodo from Smithsonian.[12]

In 2015, the Gawker blog io9 was merged into Gizmodo. The staff of io9 continued with Gizmodo and continued to post articles on subjects covered by the website, including science fiction, fantasy, futurism, science, technology and astronomy.[13]

Gizmodo was one of six websites that was purchased by Univision Communications in their acquisition of Gawker Media in August 2016. Univision in turn sold Gizmodo and an array of sister websites to private equity firm Great Hill Partners in 2019.[14]

In Australia in 2018, after Nine Entertainment merged the business behind PEDESTRIAN.TV with that of Allure Media,[15] forming the larger Pedestrian Group,[16] the website and associated company changed its name to Pedestrian, and also incorporated the brands Gizmodo AU,[6] Business Insider Australia, Kotaku and POPSUGAR Australia.[17][18]

Sub-blogs

As part of its output Gizmodo currently contains two sub-blogs as part of the wider site:

io9

Main article: io9

io9 is a science fiction and fantasy pop-culture focused sub-blog which was launched as a standalone blog in 2008 by then editor Annalee Newitz under Gawker Media,[19] before being folded under Gizmodo in 2015 as part of a reorganization under parent company Gawker.[20] The current editor is James Whitbrook.[21]

Earther

Earther logo used from 2017 to 2023.

Earther is an environmental news sub-blog which was launched in September 2017.[22] Earther launched with the mission to chronicle three main topics: "The future of Earth," "The future of humans on Earth," and "The future of life on Earth."[23] Founding managing editor Maddie Stone said that the site was created because it "felt like a salient and important time to create a destination for environmental news where folks can go to read up on the latest studies, but also hear the latest news about how natural disasters are affecting people, the big important environmental policies being raised around the world, and some of the biggest conservation stories."[22]

During its lifetime, former Earther journalists Yessenia Funues, Brian Kahn, and Molly Taft won SEAL Awards for their environmental reporting. [24][25][26]

As of broader G/O Media layoffs in November 2023 the last member of the sub-blog, Angely Mercado, was laid off meaning there are currently no staff listed as working for the sub-blog.[27][28][29]

Controversy

TV-B-Gone

Richard Blakeley, a videographer for Gizmodo's publisher, Gawker Media, disrupted several presentations held at CES in 2008.[30][31] Blakely secretly turned off TVs using TV-B-Gone remote controls, resulting in his being barred from CES 2008, and any future CES events.

iPhone 4 prototype

In April 2010, Gizmodo came into possession of what was later known to be a prototype of the iPhone 4 smartphone by Apple.[32] The site purchased the device for US$5,000 from Brian J. Hogan, who had found it unattended at a bar in Redwood City, California, a month earlier.[33][34] UC Berkeley student Sage Robert, an acquaintance of Hogan, allegedly helped him sell the phone after failing to track down the owner. With Apple confirming its provenance, bloggers such as John Gruber and Ken Sweet speculated that this transaction may have violated the California Penal Code.[35]

On April 26, after Gizmodo returned the iPhone to Apple, upon Apple's request California's Rapid Enforcement Allied Computer Team executed a search warrant on editor Jason Chen's home and seized computers, hard drives, servers, cameras, notes, and a file of business cards, under direction from San Mateo County’s Chief Deputy District Attorney Stephen Wagstaffe.[34][36][37] Since then, Gizmodo and the prosecution have agreed that a special master will review the contents of the items seized and determine if they contain relevant information.[38][39] Gizmodo was since barred from Apple-hosted events and product launches until August 2014, when they were invited once again to Apple's September 2014 "Wish we could say more" event.[40]

See also

References

  1. ^ "MG/O Media Announces New Editors In Chief Of AV Club, Gizmodo, Jezebel". Cision. August 31, 2021. Archived from the original on September 14, 2021. Retrieved September 14, 2021.
  2. ^ "Gizmodo.com WHOIS, DNS, & Domain Info – DomainTools". WHOIS. Archived from the original on September 30, 2021. Retrieved September 16, 2016.
  3. ^ Hayes, Dade (April 8, 2019). "Univision Finalizes Sale Of Former Gawker Portfolio And The Onion To Private Equity Firm Great Hill Partners". Deadline. Archived from the original on January 11, 2021. Retrieved December 17, 2019.
  4. ^ Greg Lindsay (June 1, 2004). "What Makes Nick Tick? The smartest publisher in the blogosphere says there's no money online. So why doesn't anyone believe him?". Business 2.0. Archived from the original on May 6, 2018. Retrieved January 27, 2007.
  5. ^ "VNU to Publish Gawker's Gizmodo Blog in Europe". MarketingVOX. October 7, 2005. Archived from the original on March 24, 2007. Retrieved January 27, 2007.
  6. ^ a b c "About Gizmodo Australia". Gizmodo Australia. December 14, 2021. Archived from the original on July 27, 2023. Retrieved March 18, 2022.
  7. ^ "Gizmodo Australia". Gizmodo.com.au. August 9, 2012. Archived from the original on July 26, 2023. Retrieved September 3, 2012.
  8. ^ "Gizmodo Brazil". Gizmodo.com.br. Archived from the original on September 11, 2010. Retrieved September 3, 2012.
  9. ^ "Gizmodo to launch in the UK". Guardian.com. August 31, 2011. Archived from the original on February 4, 2023. Retrieved September 29, 2017.
  10. ^ Tamburro, Paul (September 7, 2020). "Kotaku UK and Gizmodo UK shutting down, rights reverted back to G/O Media". GameRevolution. Evolve Media LLC. Archived from the original on February 4, 2023. Retrieved September 16, 2020.
  11. ^ "This Is the New Gizmodo". Gizmodo. February 7, 2011. Archived from the original on June 2, 2023. Retrieved July 8, 2023.
  12. ^ "The Paleofuture Blog Has Moved to Gizmodo". Smithsonian. May 30, 2013. Archived from the original on April 7, 2022. Retrieved August 11, 2018.
  13. ^ Ingram, Mathew. "Gawker Media merging Gizmodo and io9 teams into a tech super-hub". GigaOM. Archived from the original on April 7, 2022. Retrieved August 19, 2016.
  14. ^ Calderone, Michael (August 18, 2016). "Gawker.com Ending Operations Next Week". The Huffington Post. Archived from the original on October 16, 2016. Retrieved April 17, 2020.
  15. ^ Samios, Zoe (December 11, 2018). "Pedestrian TV and Allure merge, with Jason Scott to depart". Mumbrella. Archived from the original on February 4, 2023. Retrieved April 14, 2021.
  16. ^ Bennett, Lindsay (December 11, 2018). "Pedestrian TV to absorb Allure Media in post-Fairfax consolidation". AdNews. Archived from the original on March 21, 2022. Retrieved April 14, 2021.
  17. ^ "Nine merging digital publishers Pedestrian.TV & Allure Media". Mediaweek. December 11, 2018. Archived from the original on March 17, 2022. Retrieved March 17, 2022.
  18. ^ "Home page". Pedestrian Group. Archived from the original on March 15, 2022. Retrieved March 17, 2022.
  19. ^ Wortham, Jenna (January 2, 2008). "Gawker Blasts Into Sci-Fi With New Blog, Io9; a Q&A With Editor Annalee Newitz". Wired. Retrieved June 10, 2008.
  20. ^ "io9 to Become Part of Gizmodo". CBR. November 17, 2015. Retrieved June 1, 2021.
  21. ^ "A Message from Your New Editor". December 6, 2021.
  22. ^ a b "New site aims for 'brutally honest' environmental news". Columbia Journalism Review. October 3, 2017. Retrieved February 4, 2018.
  23. ^ Weissman, Cale Guthrie (August 6, 2017). "Gizmodo's New Environmental Site "Earther" Will Chronicle The Earth's Decline". Fast Company. Retrieved August 6, 2018.
  24. ^ "2019 SEAL Environmental Journalism Award Winners Announced". SEAL Awards. February 13, 2020. Retrieved December 19, 2023.
  25. ^ "Twelve Journalists Recognized as 2020 SEAL Environmental Journalism Award Winners". SEAL Awards. February 17, 2021. Retrieved December 19, 2023.
  26. ^ "Twelve Journalists Recognized as 2022 SEAL Environmental Journalism Award Winners". SEAL Awards. February 8, 2023. Retrieved December 19, 2023.
  27. ^ Spangler, Todd (November 9, 2023). "Jezebel Shutting Down, Parent Company G/O Media Laying Off 23 Staffers". Variety. Retrieved December 22, 2023.
  28. ^ Staff, Gizmodo (October 4, 2011). "About Gizmodo". Gizmodo. Archived from the original on December 24, 2023. Retrieved December 22, 2023.
  29. ^ https://twitter.com/AngelyMercado/status/1722664855239323954[bare URL]
  30. ^ Needleman, Rafe (January 10, 2008). "Bloggers behaving badly: Gizmodo messes with CES flat screens". Archived from the original on May 16, 2008. Retrieved January 11, 2008.
  31. ^ Lam, Brian (January 10, 2008). "Confessions: The Meanest Thing Gizmodo Did at CES". Archived from the original on January 10, 2019. Retrieved January 11, 2008.
  32. ^ Helft, Miguel; Bilton, Nick (April 19, 2010). "For Apple, Lost iPhone Is a Big Deal". The New York Times. Archived from the original on February 4, 2023. Retrieved April 22, 2010.
  33. ^ "Man who found — and sold — the missing iPhone unmasked". Today in Tech. Yahoo News. April 29, 2010. Archived from the original on May 4, 2010. Retrieved May 4, 2010.
  34. ^ a b Lundin, Leigh (May 2, 2010). "The Fourth Estate, The Death of Journalism". Newsworthy. Criminal Brief. Archived from the original on February 4, 2023. Retrieved May 21, 2010.
  35. ^ Sweet, Ken (April 19, 2010). "Gizmodo paid for iPhone 4G: so are they receivers of stolen goods?". Technology Blog. London: The Guardian. Archived from the original on February 4, 2023. Retrieved May 4, 2010.
  36. ^ Sutter, John (April 26, 2010). "Police seize computers from Gizmodo editor". SciTechBlog. CNN. Archived from the original on May 13, 2010. Retrieved May 4, 2010.
  37. ^ Calderone, Michael (April 26, 2010). "Silicon Valley cops raid Gizmodo editor's home, take four computers". The Newsroom. Yahoo News. Archived from the original on May 3, 2010. Retrieved May 4, 2010.
  38. ^ Lundin, Leigh (June 13, 2010). "Prosecutor in Search of a Crime?". Newsworthy. Criminal Brief. Archived from the original on February 4, 2023. Retrieved June 13, 2010.
  39. ^ Myslewski, Rik (June 4, 2010). "Search begins on seized Gizmodo journo kit". Der Ring des Gizmodophonelungen. San Francisco, California: The Register. Archived from the original on March 20, 2019. Retrieved August 10, 2017.
  40. ^ "Apple's iPhone Event Will Be Sept 9th (And We'll Be There)". Newsworthy. Gizmodo. August 28, 2014. Archived from the original on March 20, 2023. Retrieved September 9, 2017.