KFPH-DT
The UniMás network logo, the words UNIMÁS in blue in an italic sans serif with some rounded corners, with the word ARIZONA below in another sans serif.
CityFlagstaff, Arizona
Channels
BrandingUniMás Arizona
Programming
Affiliations
Ownership
Owner
KTVW-DT, KHOT-FM, KOMR
History
First air date
December 31, 1991 (32 years ago) (1991-12-31)
Former call signs
  • KKTM (1992–1995)
  • KWBF (1995–1998)
  • KBPX (1998–2001)
  • KDUO (2001–2002)
  • KFPH (2002–2003)
  • KFPH-TV (2004–2009)
Former channel number(s)
  • Analog: 13 (VHF, 1992–2008)
  • Digital: 27 (UHF, 2002–2009)
Call sign meaning
"Telefutura Phoenix"
Technical information[1]
Licensing authority
FCC
Facility ID41517
ERP33 kW
HAAT475.5 m (1,560 ft)
Transmitter coordinates34°58′5.8″N 111°30′36.1″W / 34.968278°N 111.510028°W / 34.968278; -111.510028
Translator(s)KTVW-DT 33.2/35.1 (UHF) Phoenix
Links
Public license information
WebsiteUniMás

KFPH-DT (channel 13), branded on-air as UniMás Arizona, is a television station licensed to Flagstaff, Arizona, United States, broadcasting the Spanish-language UniMás network to northern and central Arizona. It is owned and operated by TelevisaUnivision alongside Phoenix-based Univision outlet KTVW-DT (channel 33). In Flagstaff, Univision maintains offices on Fourth Street, though most operations are run from its Phoenix studios. The KFPH-DT transmitter is located atop Mormon Mountain, about 20 miles (32 km) south of Flagstaff in the Coconino National Forest.

In Phoenix, KFPH-DT is rebroadcast through KFPH-CD (channel 35). That station converted to an ATSC 3.0 station in 2018, though its subchannels were distributed onto other Phoenix stations for transmission. The UniMás subchannel is carried on KTVW-DT's transmitter.

Channel 13 in Flagstaff received a construction permit in October 1984, but seven years and a sale passed before the station began broadcasting as KKTM on December 31, 1991. KKTM operated as a local independent station for the Flagstaff area and became an affiliate of The WB in 1995 as KWBF. However, the sale of the station to an affiliate of Paxson Communications Corporation in 1996 heralded its conversion to infomercial programming and, beginning in 1998, the company's new Pax television network as KBPX. KBPX was paired with a translator to provide the network in Phoenix until KPPX-TV (channel 51) was completed in 1999. Two years later, Pax sold KBPX to Equity Broadcasting Corporation, which briefly programmed home shopping programming until Univision purchased the station as part of its then-new Telefutura network, today's UniMás.

History

In 1984, two groups—Minority Television of Flagstaff and Ware Communications—filed for construction permits to build a new television station on channel 13 in Flagstaff.[2] Minority Television was granted the construction permit on October 27, and the station took the call sign KKTM. A year later, Michael Gelfand, a doctor from Bethesda, Maryland, acquired the construction permit from Minority Television principal Katherine T. Mansfield.[3]

Construction work began in August 1991.[4] Meanwhile, to make way for KKTM to begin testing, a translator for Phoenix station KTSP-TV moved to the UHF band.[5] Studio space was also secured in the Greenlaw Village shopping center on Fourth Street.[6]

KKTM began broadcasting at half power from Mormon Mountain on December 31, 1991. Most of its programming came from two services primarily used by low-power stations, Channel America and Main Street TV.[7] The station also produced several local programs, including a newscast and a country music show taped at Flagstaff's Redwood Inn.[8] The newscast ceased production in June 1994.[9]

KKTM became a charter affiliate of The WB when it launched on January 11, 1995, and changed its call sign to KWBF.[10] However, Gelfand decided he did not have sufficient resources to support the station economically; in September, he agreed to sell KWBF for $1.4 million to Christian Network, Inc., an affiliated company to Paxson Communications Corporation that had been co-founded by Bud Paxson.[11][12] Christian Network then transferred its stations to Paxson Communications in May 1996.[13]

Paxson Communications launched its Pax TV network on August 31, 1998. The station began airing the new service and was given the new call sign of KBPX; the network's intended Phoenix station, KPPX-TV, was not ready to launch.[14] However, a translator on channel 67 rebroadcast the station in Phoenix.[15] KPPX-TV ultimately debuted on February 15, 1999.[16]

In March 2001, Paxson Communications sold two of its stations—KBPX and WPXS in Mount Vernon, Illinois—to Equity Broadcasting Corporation of Little Rock, Arkansas, for $17.75 million; Paxson retained the KBPX call letters.[17] The call sign was changed to KDUO on June 21, 2001, and the station switched to broadcasting the home shopping service America's Collectibles Network (now Jewelry Television). Equity also owned KOND-LP (channel 35), a Phoenix low-power station that began broadcasting KDUO's programming. Nearly immediately, Equity sold KDUO along with KBGF in Douglas, Arizona, and three low-power TV stations to Univision for $19.1 million in August.[18] The newly acquired stations became Telefutura's stations in Arizona, with KDUO changing call signs to KFPH.[19]

Technical information

Subchannels

The station's digital signal is multiplexed:

Subchannels of KFPH-DT[20]
Channel Res. Aspect Short name Programming
13.1 720p 16:9 KFPH-DT Main KFPH-DT programming / UniMás
13.2 KTVW-HD Univision (KTVW-DT)
13.3 480i 4:3 getTV GetTV
13.4 MYSTERY Ion Mystery
  Simulcast of subchannels of another station

Analog-to-digital conversion

KFPH-TV shut down its analog signal, over VHF channel 13, on September 18, 2008, citing a lack of space at its transmitter site to accommodate the analog transmitter, its digital channel 27 transmitter, and the new digital channel 13 transmitter; additionally, winter weather conditions rendered it impossible to perform work during the last 90 days before the conclusion of the digital transition.[21] The station's digital signal relocated from its pre-transition UHF channel 27 to VHF channel 13.[22]

References

  1. ^ "Facility Technical Data for KFPH-DT". Licensing and Management System. Federal Communications Commission.
  2. ^ "Legal No. 4004". Arizona Daily Sun. Flagstaff, Arizona. May 17, 1984. p. 22. Archived from the original on November 23, 2022. Retrieved November 23, 2022 – via Newspapers.com.
  3. ^ "Legal No. 2075". Arizona Daily Sun. Flagstaff, Arizona. August 28, 1985. p. 17. Archived from the original on November 23, 2022. Retrieved November 23, 2022 – via Newspapers.com.
  4. ^ Briand, Xavier (August 16, 1991). "New local TV station construction started: Transmitter placed on Mormon Mountain". Arizona Daily Sun. Flagstaff, Arizona. pp. 1, 14. Archived from the original on January 10, 2023. Retrieved November 23, 2022 – via Newspapers.com.
  5. ^ "New channel draws nearer to operation". Arizona Daily Sun. Flagstaff, Arizona. October 1, 1991. p. 2. Archived from the original on November 23, 2022. Retrieved November 23, 2022 – via Newspapers.com.
  6. ^ Briand, Xavier (November 27, 1991). "P&Z panel approves TV station". Arizona Daily Sun. p. 2. Archived from the original on November 23, 2022. Retrieved November 23, 2022 – via Newspapers.com.
  7. ^ "KKTM ready for full-power debut: New TV station five years in the making". Arizona Daily Sun. Flagstaff, Arizona. July 18, 1992. p. 22. Archived from the original on November 23, 2022. Retrieved November 23, 2022 – via Newspapers.com.
  8. ^ Briand, Xavier (November 5, 1992). "TV station says cable firm tuning it out". Arizona Daily Sun. Flagstaff, Arizona. p. 1. Archived from the original on November 23, 2022. Retrieved November 23, 2022 – via Newspapers.com.
  9. ^ Yanez, Diana (June 30, 1994). "Airwaves a little too hot". Arizona Daily Sun. Flagstaff, Arizona. p. 2. Archived from the original on November 23, 2022. Retrieved November 23, 2022 – via Newspapers.com.
  10. ^ "KKTM becoming KWBF". Arizona Daily Sun. Flagstaff, Arizona. January 10, 1995. p. 4. Archived from the original on November 23, 2022. Retrieved November 23, 2022 – via Newspapers.com.
  11. ^ "Christian network buys Channel 13". Arizona Daily Sun. Flagstaff, Arizona. September 27, 1995. p. 3. Archived from the original on November 23, 2022. Retrieved November 23, 2022 – via Newspapers.com.
  12. ^ "The $1 million-plus club" (PDF). Broadcasting & Cable. March 11, 1996. p. 44. Archived (PDF) from the original on November 23, 2022. Retrieved November 23, 2022.
  13. ^ "Changing Hands" (PDF). Broadcasting & Cable. May 13, 1996. p. 30. Archived (PDF) from the original on November 23, 2022. Retrieved November 23, 2022.
  14. ^ Walker, Dave (July 30, 1998). "Channel 51 to join Pax network when it's already in progress". Arizona Republic. p. HL8. Archived from the original on January 10, 2023. Retrieved November 23, 2022 – via Newspapers.com.
  15. ^ Walker, Dave (August 30, 1998). "Pax TV targets families". Arizona Republic. p. E5, E6. Archived from the original on November 23, 2022. Retrieved November 23, 2022 – via Newspapers.com.
  16. ^ Walker, Dave (February 13, 1999). "Ex-Symington aide to be station manager at new Channel 51". Arizona Republic. p. A4. Archived from the original on November 23, 2022. Retrieved November 23, 2022 – via Newspapers.com.
  17. ^ "Changing Hands" (PDF). Broadcasting & Cable. March 5, 2001. p. 32. Archived (PDF) from the original on December 6, 2022. Retrieved November 23, 2022.
  18. ^ "Changing Hands" (PDF). Broadcasting & Cable. August 13, 2001. p. 40. Archived (PDF) from the original on March 8, 2021. Retrieved November 23, 2022.
  19. ^ Kjos, Tiffany (January 31, 2002). "Spanish TV battle heats up". Arizona Daily Star. pp. D1, D5. Archived from the original on January 10, 2023. Retrieved March 7, 2021.
  20. ^ "RabbitEars TV Query for KFPH". RabbitEars. Archived from the original on November 23, 2022. Retrieved November 23, 2022.
  21. ^ "DTV TRANSITION STATUS REPORT". CDBS Public Access. Federal Communications Commission. October 21, 2008. Archived from the original on January 10, 2023. Retrieved November 2, 2008.
  22. ^ "DTV Tentative Channel Designations for the First and Second Rounds" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on August 29, 2013. Retrieved March 24, 2012.