Mohave County
Mohave County Courthouse in Kingman
Mohave County Courthouse in Kingman
Official seal of Mohave County
Map of Arizona highlighting Mohave County
Location within the U.S. state of Arizona
Map of the United States highlighting Arizona
Arizona's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 35°40′55″N 113°51′47″W / 35.681944444444°N 113.86305555556°W / 35.681944444444; -113.86305555556
Country United States
State Arizona
FoundedNovember 9, 1864
Named forFort Mohave
SeatKingman
Largest cityLake Havasu City
Area
 • Total13,461 sq mi (34,860 km2)
 • Land13,311 sq mi (34,480 km2)
 • Water150 sq mi (400 km2)  1.1%
Population
 (2020)
 • Total213,267
 • Estimate 
(2021)
217,692 Increase
 • Density16/sq mi (6.1/km2)
Time zoneUTC−7 (Mountain)
Congressional districts1st, 4th
Websitewww.mohavecounty.us

Mohave County is in the northwestern corner of the U.S. state of Arizona. As of the 2020 census, its population was 213,267.[1] The county seat is Kingman,[2] and the largest city is Lake Havasu City. It is the fifth largest county in the United States (by area).

Mohave County includes the Lake Havasu City–Kingman, Arizona Metropolitan Statistical Area, which is also included in the Las Vegas-Henderson, Nevada-Arizona Combined Statistical Area.

Mohave County contains parts of Grand Canyon National Park and Lake Mead National Recreation Area and all of the Grand Canyon–Parashant National Monument. The Kaibab, Fort Mojave and Hualapai Indian Reservations also lie within the county.

History

Mohave County was the one of four original Arizona Counties created by the 1st Arizona Territorial Legislature. The county territory was originally defined as being west of longitude 113° 20' and north of the Bill Williams River.[3] Pah-Ute County was created from it in 1865 and was merged back into Mohave County in 1871 when much of its territory was ceded to Nevada in 1866. The county's present boundaries were established in 1881. The county is also notable for being home to a large polygamous Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints sect located in Colorado City.

Mohave County has had five county seats: Mohave City (1864–1867), Hardyville (1867–1873), Cerbat (1873–1877), Mineral Park (1877–1887), and Kingman (1887–present).[4]

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 13,461 square miles (34,860 km2), of which 13,311 square miles (34,480 km2) is land and 150 square miles (390 km2) (1.1%) is water.[5] It is the second-largest county by area in Arizona and the fifth-largest in the contiguous United States.

The county consists of two sections divided by the Grand Canyon, with no direct land communication between them. The northern section, smaller and less populated, forms the western part of the Arizona Strip, bordering Utah and Nevada. The larger southern section borders Nevada and California across the Colorado River, which forms most of the county's western boundary. The southern section includes Kingman, the county seat, and other cities, as well as part of the Mojave Desert.

Adjacent counties

Mohave County and its adjacent counties form the largest such block of counties outside of Alaska. Their combined land area is 89,567.34 square miles (231,978.3 km2), or larger than that of the state of Idaho. They include the #1 (San Bernardino), #2 (Coconino), #5 (Mohave), and #7 (Lincoln) largest counties outside of Alaska. If Nye County, Nevada- which is #3 for total county area that does not border Mohave but borders neighboring Lincoln and Clark counties is included, then the combined land area would be 107,726.34 squard miles or larger than the state of Colorado.

National protected areas

There are 18 official wilderness areas in Mohave County that are part of the National Wilderness Preservation System. Most of these are managed by the Bureau of Land Management, but some are integral parts of the preceding protected areas, or have shared jurisdiction with the BLM. Some extend into neighboring counties (as indicated below) All wilderness areas within Grand Canyon–Parashant National Monument are managed by BLM, although the National Monument shares management with the National Park Service:

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1870179
18801,190564.8%
18901,44421.3%
19003,426137.3%
19103,77310.1%
19205,25939.4%
19305,5726.0%
19408,59154.2%
19508,510−0.9%
19607,736−9.1%
197025,857234.2%
198055,865116.1%
199093,49767.4%
2000155,03265.8%
2010200,18629.1%
2020213,2676.5%
2021 (est.)217,692[6]2.1%
U.S. Decennial Census[7]
1790–1960[8] 1900–1990[9]
1990–2000[10] 2010–2020[1]

2000 census

As of the census of 2000, there were 155,032 people, 62,809 households, and 43,401 families living in the county. The population density was 12 people per square mile (4/km2). There were 80,062 housing units at an average density of 6 per square mile (2/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 90.1% White, 0.5% Black or African American, 2.4% Native American, 0.8% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 4.0% from other races, and 2.1% from two or more races. 11.1% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 62,809 households, out of which 25.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.1% were married couples living together, 9.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.9% were non-families. 24.1% of all households were made up of individuals, and 11.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.45 and the average family size was 2.87.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 23.1% under the age of 18, 6.5% from 18 to 24, 23.2% from 25 to 44, 26.7% from 45 to 64, and 20.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43 years. For every 100 females there were 98.90 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.80 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $31,521, and the median income for a family was $36,311. Males had a median income of $28,505 versus $20,632 for females. The per capita income for the county was $16,788. About 9.8% of families and 13.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 20.4% of those under age 18 and 7.7% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census

As of the census of 2010, there were 200,186 people, 82,539 households, and 54,036 families living in the county.[11] The population density was 15.0 inhabitants per square mile (5.8/km2). There were 110,911 housing units at an average density of 8.3 per square mile (3.2/km2).[12] The racial makeup of the county was 86.9% white, 2.2% American Indian, 1.1% Asian, 0.9% black or African American, 0.2% Pacific islander, 6.0% from other races, and 2.7% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 14.8% of the population.[11] In terms of ancestry, 23.1% were German, 16.2% were Irish, 15.6% were English, 5.7% were Italian, and 4.5% were American.[13]

Of the 82,539 households, 24.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.5% were married couples living together, 10.4% had a female householder with no husband present, 34.5% were non-families, and 26.7% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.39 and the average family size was 2.86. The median age was 47.6 years.[11]

The median income for a household in the county was $39,785 and the median income for a family was $47,530. Males had a median income of $36,222 versus $28,060 for females. The per capita income for the county was $21,523. About 11.6% of families and 16.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 24.7% of those under age 18 and 7.0% of those age 65 or over.[14]

Politics, government, and infrastructure

Since 2008, Mohave has taken over from Graham and Yavapai as the “reddest” county in the state, and in 2016 it stood as such by twenty percentage points. No Democratic presidential nominee has carried Mohave County since Lyndon Johnson, who, despite the home state advantage of Arizona native Barry Goldwater, did so in 1964, by a margin of only 152 votes. (In the 1990s, Bill Clinton came very close to winning this county, if not because of a combination of significant nationwide rural appeal and third-party candidate Ross Perot's Western appeal himself.)

In recent elections it has become common for Democratic nominees to receive less than thirty percent of the county's vote, and Hillary Clinton in 2016 received less than 22 percent. In 2020 Donald Trump received nearly 75% of the vote in Mohave County.

United States presidential election results for Mohave County, Arizona[15][16]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 78,535 74.88% 24,831 23.67% 1,517 1.45%
2016 58,282 72.90% 17,455 21.83% 4,206 5.26%
2012 49,168 69.91% 19,533 27.77% 1,627 2.31%
2008 44,333 65.20% 22,092 32.49% 1,570 2.31%
2004 36,794 63.53% 20,503 35.40% 618 1.07%
2000 24,386 55.25% 17,470 39.58% 2,285 5.18%
1996 17,997 43.33% 16,629 40.04% 6,907 16.63%
1992 13,684 33.69% 13,255 32.63% 13,677 33.67%
1988 17,651 62.40% 10,197 36.05% 438 1.55%
1984 17,364 69.26% 7,436 29.66% 272 1.08%
1980 13,809 68.86% 4,900 24.43% 1,345 6.71%
1976 7,601 51.92% 6,504 44.43% 535 3.65%
1972 6,755 68.92% 2,588 26.41% 458 4.67%
1968 3,208 51.64% 2,109 33.95% 895 14.41%
1964 2,091 48.19% 2,243 51.69% 5 0.12%
1960 1,641 55.59% 1,303 44.14% 8 0.27%
1956 1,523 60.99% 968 38.77% 6 0.24%
1952 1,746 62.09% 1,066 37.91% 0 0.00%
1948 1,167 43.03% 1,499 55.27% 46 1.70%
1944 974 42.64% 1,303 57.05% 7 0.31%
1940 1,198 37.16% 2,024 62.78% 2 0.06%
1936 609 24.08% 1,814 71.73% 106 4.19%
1932 537 23.52% 1,660 72.71% 86 3.77%
1928 1,127 60.33% 728 38.97% 13 0.70%
1924 738 38.00% 475 24.46% 729 37.54%
1920 996 57.97% 722 42.03% 0 0.00%
1916 643 28.89% 1,335 59.97% 248 11.14%
1912 69 8.56% 320 39.70% 417 51.74%


The Mohave County Administration Building is located in downtown Kingman at 700 West Beale Street. The old County Complex, which the Administration Building replaced, was located adjacent to the courthouse on Spring Street and 4th Street. The Mohave County Superior Courthouse, built in 1915, is an Art Deco/Streamline Moderne building on the National Register of Historic Places. The county jail is adjacent to the County Administration Building at 501 S. Highway 66.

Arizona State Prison – Kingman, a privately run prison of the Arizona Department of Corrections, is located in unincorporated Mohave County near Golden Valley and Kingman.[17][18]

Education

K-12 school districts

The following school districts serve Mohave County:[19]

Unified school districts
High school districts
Elementary school districts

Additionally there is a charter school:

Colleges

Public libraries

The Mohave County Library has ten branches. The branches in Bullhead City, Kingman and Lake Havasu City are open 56 hours a week. The branch in Mohave Valley is open 40 hours a week. Branches in Chloride, Dolan Springs, Golden Shores, Golden Valley, Meadview and Valle Vista are open 15 hours a week.

Transportation

Major highways

State Route 389 in Mohave County
State Route 389 in Mohave County

Airports

The following public use airports are located in Mohave County:

Communities

Cities

Towns

Census designated places

Ghost towns

Indian communities

County population ranking

The population ranking of the following table is based on the 2010 census of Mohave County.[22][23]

county seat

Rank City/Town/etc. Population (2010 Census) Municipal type Incorporated
1 Lake Havasu City 52,527 City 1978
2 Bullhead City 39,540 City 1984
3 Kingman 28,068 City 1952
4 Fort Mohave 14,364 CDP
5 New Kingman-Butler 12,134 CDP
6 Golden Valley 8,370 CDP
7 Colorado City 4,821 City 1913 (founded)
8 Mohave Valley 2,616 CDP
9 Desert Hills 2,245 CDP
10 Golden Shores 2,047 CDP
11 Dolan Springs 2,033 CDP
12 Beaver Dam 1,962 CDP
13 Valle Vista 1,659 CDP
14 Scenic 1,643 CDP
15 Centennial Park 1,264 CDP
16 Meadview 1,224 CDP
17 Peach Springs 1,090 CDP
18 Willow Valley 1,062 CDP
19 Arizona Village 946 CDP
20 Walnut Creek 562 CDP
21 So-Hi 477 CDP
22 Cane Beds 448 CDP
23 Lazy Y U 428 CDP
24 Mesquite Creek 416 CDP
25 White Hills 323 CDP
26 Littlefield 308 CDP
27 Crystal Beach 279 CDP
28 Chloride 271 CDP
29 Pinion Pines 186 CDP
30 Clacks Canyon 173 CDP
31 Pine Lake 138 CDP
32 Oatman 135 CDP
33 Truxton 134 CDP
34 Wikieup 133 CDP
t-35 Antares 126 CDP
t-35 Yucca 126 CDP
36 Kaibab (partially in Coconino County) 124 CDP
37 Katherine 103 CDP
38 Moccasin 89 CDP
39 McConnico 70 CDP
40 Hackberry 68 CDP
41 Mojave Ranch Estates 52 CDP
42 Valentine 38 CDP
43 Crozier 14 CDP
44 Topock 10 CDP
45 Grand Canyon West 2 CDP

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved September 27, 2022.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. ^ Wagoner, Jay J. (1970). Arizona Territory 1863–1912: A Political history. Tucson: University of Arizona Press. p. 58. ISBN 0816501769.
  4. ^ Walker, Henry (1986). "Historical Atlas of Arizona", p. 32. University of Oklahoma Press, Norman. ISBN 978-0806120249
  5. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 23, 2012. Retrieved August 23, 2015.
  6. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Counties: April 1, 2020 to July 1, 2021". Retrieved September 27, 2022.
  7. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 18, 2014.
  8. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved May 18, 2014.
  9. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 18, 2014.
  10. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Archived (PDF) from the original on October 9, 2022. Retrieved May 18, 2014.
  11. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved January 20, 2016.
  12. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 – County". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved January 20, 2016.
  13. ^ "DP02 Selected Social Characteristics in the United States – 2006–2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved January 20, 2016.
  14. ^ "DP03 Selected Economic Characteristics – 2006–2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved January 20, 2016.
  15. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved May 9, 2018.
  16. ^ Scammon, Richard M. (compiler); America at the Polls: A Handbook of Presidential Election Statistics 1920–1964; pp. 42–44 ISBN 0405077114
  17. ^ "Arizona State Prison – Kingman (MTC)". March 31, 2014.
  18. ^ "Golden Valley CDP, Arizona Archived June 8, 2011, at the Wayback Machine." U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved on August 13, 2010.
  19. ^ "2020 Census – School District Reference Map: Mohave County, AZ" (PDF). U.S. Census Bureau. Archived (PDF) from the original on October 9, 2022. Retrieved July 28, 2022.Text list
  20. ^ "HB2515 – 491R – House Bill Summary". Retrieved November 10, 2021.
  21. ^ a b c d e f g Varney, Philip (1980). "Mohave Ghosts". Arizona's Best Ghost Towns. Flagstaff: Northland Press. pp. 46–55. ISBN 0873582179. LCCN 79-91724.
  22. ^ CNMP, US Census Bureau. "This site has been redesigned and relocated. – U.S. Census Bureau". www.census.gov. Retrieved May 9, 2018.
  23. ^ Geography, US Census Bureau. "2010 Census Block Maps". www.census.gov. Retrieved May 9, 2018.

Coordinates: 35°40′55″N 113°51′47″W / 35.68194°N 113.86306°W / 35.68194; -113.86306