Governor of Arizona
= Current Arizona Governor Katie Hobbs
Incumbent
Katie Hobbs
since January 2, 2023
Government of Arizona
StyleThe Honorable
Status
ResidenceNo official residence
Term lengthFour years, renewable once consecutively[1]
Constituting instrumentArizona Constitution, article V[2]
Inaugural holderGeorge W. P. Hunt
FormationFebruary 14, 1912
DeputyNone (Lieutenant expected to be elected in 2026)
Salary$95,000 (2013)[3]
Websiteazgovernor.gov

The governor of Arizona is the head of government of the U.S. state of Arizona.[4] As the top elected official, the governor is the head of the executive branch of the Arizona state government and is charged with faithfully executing state laws.[4] The governor has the power to either approve or veto bills passed by the Arizona State Legislature;[5] to convene the legislature;[4] and to grant pardons,[6] except in cases of impeachment. The governor is also the commander-in-chief of the state's military forces.[7]

Twenty-four people have served as governor over 28 distinct terms. All of the repeat governors were in the state's earliest years, when George W. P. Hunt and Thomas Edward Campbell alternated as governor for 17 years and, after a two-year gap, Hunt served another term. One governor, Evan Mecham, was successfully impeached, and one, Fife Symington, resigned upon being convicted of a felony. The longest-serving governor was Hunt, who was elected seven times and served just under fourteen years. The longest single stint was that of Bruce Babbitt, who was elected to two four-year terms after succeeding to the office following the death of his predecessor, Wesley Bolin, serving nearly nine years total. Bolin had the shortest tenure, dying less than five months after succeeding as governor. Arizona has had five female governors, the most in the United States, and was the first—and until 2019 (when Michelle Lujan Grisham succeeded Susana Martinez in neighboring New Mexico) the only—state where female governors served consecutively.

The governor, as of January 2, 2023, is Democrat Katie Hobbs.

List of governors

Confederate Arizona

Main article: Confederate Arizona

In Tucson between April 2 and April 5, 1860, a convention of settlers from the southern half of New Mexico Territory drafted a provisional constitution for "Arizona Territory", three years before the United States would create such a territory. This proposed territory consisted of the part of New Mexico Territory south of 33° 40' north. On April 2,[8] they elected a governor, Lewis S. Owings. The provisional territory was to exist until such time as an official territory was created, but that proposal was rejected by Congress at the time.[9]

On March 16, 1861, soon before the American Civil War broke out, a convention in Mesilla voted that the provisional territory should secede from the Union and join the Confederacy.[10] Lewis S. Owings remained on as the provisional governor of the territory.

The Confederacy took ownership of the territory on August 1, 1861, when forces led by Lieutenant Colonel John R. Baylor won decisive control of the territory, and Baylor proclaimed himself governor.[11] Arizona Territory was formally organized in the Confederacy on January 18, 1862.[12] On March 20, 1862, Baylor issued an order to kill all the adult Apache and take their children into slavery.[11] When Confederate President Jefferson Davis learned of this order, he strongly disapproved and demanded an explanation. Baylor wrote a letter December 29, 1862, to justify his decision, and after this was received, Davis relieved Baylor of his post and commission, calling his letter an "avowal of an infamous crime".n By that time, the Confederate government of Arizona Territory was in exile in San Antonio, Texas, as the territory had been effectively lost to Union forces in July 1862;[13] no new governor was appointed.

Territory of Arizona

Arizona Territory was formed on February 24, 1863, from New Mexico Territory, remaining a territory for 49 years.[14]

Governors of the Territory of Arizona
No. Governor Term in office[a] Appointing President
John A. Gurley
(1813–1863)
March 10, 1863

August 19, 1863
(died before taking office)[b]
Abraham Lincoln
1 John Noble Goodwin
(1824–1887)
[19]
August 21, 1863[c]

April 10, 1866
(resigned)[d]
Abraham Lincoln
2 Richard Cunningham McCormick
(1832–1901)
[26]
April 10, 1866[e]

March 4, 1869
(resigned)[f]
Andrew Johnson
3 Anson P. K. Safford
(1830–1891)
[34]
April 8, 1869[g]

April 5, 1877
(term expired)[h]
Ulysses S. Grant
4 John Philo Hoyt
(1841–1926)
[40]
April 5, 1877[i]

June 14, 1878
(resigned)[j]
Rutherford B. Hayes
5 John C. Frémont
(1813–1890)
[45]
June 14, 1878[k]

October 11, 1881
(resigned)[l]
Rutherford B. Hayes
6 Frederick Augustus Tritle
(1833–1906)
[50]
February 6, 1882[m]

October 7, 1885
(resigned)[n]
Chester A. Arthur
7 C. Meyer Zulick
(1839–1926)
[56]
October 15, 1885[o]

March 28, 1889
(successor appointed)
Grover Cleveland
8 Lewis Wolfley
(1839–1910)
[62]
March 28, 1889[p]

August 20, 1890
(resigned)[q]
Benjamin Harrison
9 John N. Irwin
(1844–1905)
[69]
October 1, 1890[r]

April 19, 1892
(resigned)[s]
Benjamin Harrison
10 Oakes Murphy
(1849–1908)
[75]
May 9, 1892[t]

April 13, 1893
(successor appointed)[u]
Benjamin Harrison
11 L. C. Hughes
(1842–1915)
[80]
April 8, 1893[v]

April 1, 1896
(successor appointed)[w]
Grover Cleveland
12 Benjamin Joseph Franklin
(1839–1898)
[85]
April 8, 1896[x]

July 22, 1897
(resigned)[y]
Grover Cleveland
13 Myron H. McCord
(1840–1908)
[91]
July 17, 1897[z]

August 1, 1898
(resigned)[aa]
William McKinley
14 Oakes Murphy
(1849–1908)
[75]
July 16, 1898[ab]

July 1, 1902
(resigned)[ac]
William McKinley
15 Alexander Oswald Brodie
(1849–1918)
[105]
May 14, 1902[ad]

February 14, 1905
(resigned)[ae]
Theodore Roosevelt
16 Joseph Henry Kibbey
(1853–1924)
[111]
February 27, 1905[af]

April 15, 1909
(successor appointed)
Theodore Roosevelt
17 Richard Elihu Sloan
(1857–1933)
[117]
April 15, 1909[ag]

February 14, 1912
(statehood)
William Howard Taft

State of Arizona

The state of Arizona was admitted to the Union on February 14, 1912, the last of the contiguous states to be admitted.

The state constitution of 1912 called for the election of a governor every two years.[123] The term was increased to four years by a 1968 amendment.[124][125] The constitution originally included no term limit,[126] but an amendment passed in 1992 allows governors to succeed themselves only once;[123] before this, four governors were elected more than twice in a row. Gubernatorial terms begin on the first Monday in the January following the election.[123] Governors who have served the two term limit can run again after four years out of office.

Arizona is one of seven states which does not have a lieutenant governor. Instead, in the event of a vacancy in the office of governor, the secretary of state, if elected, succeeds to the office. If the secretary of state was appointed rather than elected, or is otherwise ineligible to hold the office of governor, the next elected and eligible person in the line of succession assumes the office. The state constitution specifies the line of succession to be the Secretary of State, Attorney General, State Treasurer and Superintendent of Public Instruction, in that order.[127] If the governor is out of the state or impeached, the next elected officer in the line of succession becomes acting governor until the governor returns or is cleared.[127] In either case, any partial term counts toward the limit of two consecutive terms.

The line of succession has reached beyond the secretary of state only once, when Attorney General Bruce Babbitt became governor upon the death of Wesley Bolin. Rose Mofford had been appointed secretary of state to replace Bolin after Bolin succeeded to the governorship. Bolin had become governor when Raúl Héctor Castro resigned to accept appointment as ambassador to Argentina. Mofford later became acting governor after Evan Mecham was impeached by the House of Representatives, and succeeded to the governorship when Mecham was removed from office after his conviction by the Senate.

Governors of the State of Arizona
No.[ah] Governor Term in office Party Election
1   George W. P. Hunt
(1859–1934)
[129][130]
February 14, 1912[131]

January 1, 1917
(lost election)[ai]
Democratic[132] 1911
1914
2 Thomas Edward Campbell
(1878–1944)
[133]
January 1, 1917[134]

December 25, 1917
(removed from office)
Republican[132] 1916[ai]
1 George W. P. Hunt
(1859–1934)
[129][130]
December 25, 1917[138]

January 6, 1919
(did not run)
Democratic[132]
2 Thomas Edward Campbell
(1878–1944)
[133]
January 6, 1919[139]

January 1, 1923
(lost election)
Republican[132] 1918
1920
1 George W. P. Hunt
(1859–1934)
[129][130]
January 1, 1923[140]

January 7, 1929
(lost election)
Democratic[132] 1922
1924
1926
3 John Calhoun Phillips
(1870–1943)
[141][142]
January 7, 1929[143]

January 5, 1931
(lost election)
Republican[132] 1928
1 George W. P. Hunt
(1859–1934)
[129][130]
January 5, 1931[144]

January 2, 1933
(lost nomination)[145]
Democratic[132] 1930
4 Benjamin Baker Moeur
(1869–1937)
[146][147]
January 2, 1933[148]

January 4, 1937
(lost nomination)[146]
Democratic[132] 1932
1934
5 Rawghlie Clement Stanford
(1879–1963)
[149][150]
January 4, 1937[151]

January 2, 1939
(did not run)
Democratic[132] 1936
6 Robert Taylor Jones
(1884–1958)
[152][153]
January 2, 1939[154]

January 6, 1941
(lost nomination)[155]
Democratic[132] 1938
7 Sidney Preston Osborn
(1884–1948)
[156][157]
January 6, 1941[158]

May 25, 1948
(died in office)
Democratic[132] 1940
1942
1944
1946
8 Dan Edward Garvey
(1886–1974)
[159][160]
May 25, 1948[161]

January 1, 1951
(lost nomination)[aj]
Democratic[132] Succeeded from
secretary of state
1948
9 John Howard Pyle
(1906–1987)
[163][164]
January 1, 1951[165]

January 3, 1955
(lost election)
Republican[132] 1950
1952
10 Ernest McFarland
(1894–1984)
[166][167]
January 3, 1955[168]

January 5, 1959
(did not run)
Democratic[132] 1954
1956
11 Paul Fannin
(1907–2002)
[169][170]
January 5, 1959[171]

January 4, 1965
(did not run)
Republican[132] 1958
1960
1962
12 Samuel Pearson Goddard Jr.
(1919–2006)
[172][173]
January 4, 1965[174]

January 2, 1967
(lost election)
Democratic[132] 1964
13 Jack Williams
(1909–1998)
[175][176]
January 2, 1967[177]

January 6, 1975
(did not run)[ak]
Republican[132] 1966
1968
1970[al]
14 Raúl Héctor Castro
(1916–2015)
[179][180]
January 6, 1975[181]

October 20, 1977
(resigned)[am]
Democratic[132] 1974
15 Wesley Bolin
(1909–1978)
[182][183]
October 20, 1977[184]

March 4, 1978
(died in office)
Democratic[183] Succeeded from
secretary of state
16 Bruce Babbitt
(b. 1938)
[185]
March 4, 1978[186]

January 5, 1987
(did not run)
Democratic[185] Succeeded from
attorney general
[an]
1978
1982
17 Evan Mecham
(1924–2008)
[187]
January 5, 1987[188]

April 4, 1988
(impeached and removed)[ao]
Republican[187] 1986
18 Rose Mofford
(1922–2016)
[190]
April 4, 1988[191]

March 6, 1991
(did not run)
Democratic[190] Succeeded from
secretary of state
19 Fife Symington
(b. 1945)
[192]
March 6, 1991[193]

September 5, 1997
(resigned)[ap]
Republican[192] 1990–1991[aq]
1994
20 Jane Dee Hull
(1935–2020)
[196]
September 5, 1997[197]

January 6, 2003
(term-limited)[ar]
Republican[196] Succeeded from
secretary of state
1998
21 Janet Napolitano
(b. 1957)
[199]
January 6, 2003[200]

January 20, 2009
(resigned)[as]
Democratic[199] 2002
2006
22 Jan Brewer
(b. 1944)
[201]
January 20, 2009[202]

January 5, 2015
(did not run)[at]
Republican[201] Succeeded from
secretary of state
2010
23 Doug Ducey
(b. 1964)
[204]
January 5, 2015[205]

January 2, 2023
(term-limited)[ar]
Republican[204] 2014
2018
24 Katie Hobbs
(b. 1969)
[206]
January 2, 2023[207]

Incumbent[au]
Democratic[206] 2022

See also

Notes

  1. ^ The range given is from the date the governor was confirmed by the Senate, or appointed by the President during a Senate recess, to the date the governor's successor was confirmed, unless noted.
  2. ^ Gurley was nominated on March 7, 1863,[15] and was confirmed by the Senate on March 10,[16] but died on August 19, before he could take office.[17][18]
  3. ^ Goodwin was appointed on August 21, 1863,[20] during a Senate recess; nominated on January 7, 1864;[21] and confirmed by the Senate on February 4, 1864.[22] He established the territorial government on December 29, 1863.[23][24]
  4. ^ Goodwin resigned, having been elected to the United States House of Representatives for a term which began on March 4, 1865; he held both offices for thirteen months.[19]>[25]
  5. ^ McCormick was nominated on March 14, 1866,[27] confirmed by the Senate on April 10,[28] and he took office on July 9.[29][30]
  6. ^ McCormick resigned, having been elected to the United States House of Representatives. While he took office on March 4, 1869,[31][32] at least one contemporary report said he resigned from the governorship on March 3.[33]
  7. ^ Safford was nominated on April 3, 1869,[35] confirmed by the Senate on April 8,[36] and took office on July 9.[37] He was reconfirmed by the Senate on March 18, 1873.[38]
  8. ^ While some sources say Safford resigned due to health and personal concerns,[34] President Hayes' nomination of his successor John Philo Hoyt specified, "vice A. P. K. Safford, whose term of office has expired."[39]
  9. ^ Hoyt was appointed on April 5, 1877,[41] during a Senate recess; nominated on October 17,[39] and confirmed by the Senate on October 29.[42] Despite already being in the territory when appointed, he did not take office until May 30, due to involvement as secretary of the territory in litigation over moving the territorial capital.[40][43]
  10. ^ McMullin states that Hoyt was asked to resign on June 11, 1878,[40] the day Hayes nominated Hoyt to be governor of Idaho Territory and Frémont to succeed him as governor of Arizona Territory.[44]
  11. ^ Frémont was nominated on June 11, 1878,[46] confirmed by the Senate on June 14,[47] and took office on October 6.[45][48]
  12. ^ Frémont resigned; he spent little time in the territory, and the Secretary of the Territory eventually asked him to resume his duties or resign, and he chose resignation.[49]
  13. ^ Tritle was nominated on January 27, 1882,[51] confirmed by the Senate on February 6,[52] and took office on March 8.[49][53][54]
  14. ^ Tritle resigned after Grover Cleveland was elected president, so that the Democrat could appoint a Democrat as governor.[50][55]
  15. ^ Zulick was appointed on October 15, 1885,[57] during a Senate recess; nominated on December 10, 1885;[58] and confirmed by the Senate on May 5, 1886.[59] He took office on November 2, 1885.[60][61]
  16. ^ Wolfley was nominated on March 14, 1889,[63] confirmed by the Senate on March 28,[64] and took office on April 8.[65][66]
  17. ^ Wolfley resigned due to a disagreement with the federal government on arid land policy.[62][67][68]
  18. ^ Irwin was nominated on September 29, 1890,[70] confirmed by the Senate on October 1, 1890,[71] and took office on January 20, 1891.[72]
  19. ^ Irwin resigned to handle family business out of state.[73][74]
  20. ^ Murphy was nominated on April 22, 1892,[76] and confirmed by the Senate on May 9.[77] As he was secretary of the territory, he did not take office until his successor to that office was confirmed, which occurred on June 2.[78]
  21. ^ While some sources say Murphy resigned before Hughes took office,[75] contemporary news reported that Murphy handed the office directly to Hughes on April 13, 1893.[79]
  22. ^ Hughes was nominated on April 5, 1893,[81] confirmed by the Senate on April 8,[82] and took office on April 13.[79]
  23. ^ Hughes had abolished many territorial offices, and unhappy officials successfully petitioned President Cleveland to remove him.[83][80][84]
  24. ^ Franklin was nominated on March 30, 1896,[86] confirmed by the Senate on April 8,[87] and took office on April 18.[85][88][89]
  25. ^ His successor having been sworn in out of state, and given instruction from the federal government, Franklin resigned the office and handed over duties to the secretary of the territory, Charles H. Akers.[90]
  26. ^ McCord was nominated on May 20, 1897,[92] and confirmed on July 17.[93] He was sworn in as governor in Virginia on July 21,[94] though Charles H. Akers was still acting governor of the territory until McCord arrived on July 28.[95]
  27. ^ McCord resigned to serve in the Spanish–American War.[91][96]
  28. ^ Murphy was appointed on July 16, 1898,[97] during a Senate recess; nominated on December 8;[97] and confirmed by the Senate on December 14.[98] He took office on August 1.[99][100][101]
  29. ^ Murphy was asked by President Theodore Roosevelt to resign for opposing the Newlands Reclamation Act;[102] he submitted his resignation in April 1902 to take effect June 30,[103] and remained until his successor took office.[104]
  30. ^ Brodie was nominated on May 7, 1902,[106] confirmed by the Senate on May 14,[107] and took office on July 1.[104][108]
  31. ^ Brodie resigned, having been appointed assistant chief of the records and pension bureau at the United States Department of War.[109][110]
  32. ^ Kibbey was nominated on February 10, 1905,[112] confirmed by the Senate on February 27,[113] and took office on March 7,[111][114] for a term to expire February 27, 1909.[115] Though he was renominated on December 16, 1908,[115] the Senate did not confirm him before the end of the session.[116]
  33. ^ Sloan was nominated on April 8, 1809,[118] confirmed by the Senate on April 15,[119] and took office on May 1.[120][121][122]
  34. ^ The governor's website labeled Katie Hobbs as the 24th governor;[128] based on this, each governor is numbered only once, regardless of how many distinct terms they served. Repeat terms are listed with the governor's original number in italics.
  35. ^ a b Initial results showed that Campbell had won by 30 votes, but Hunt challenged the results, claiming that several precincts had experienced fraudulent voting.[135] The Arizona Supreme Court named Campbell governor on January 27, 1917, and forced Hunt to surrender his office.[136] Hunt continued fighting in court, and on December 22, was declared the winner of the election by 43 votes.[137] Campbell vacated the office three days later.[130]
  36. ^ Garvey lost the Democratic nomination to Ana Frohmiller.[159][162]
  37. ^ Sobel says that Williams lost the 1974 election, but that was someone with a similar name, Russell Williams.[178]
  38. ^ First term under a constitutional amendment which lengthened terms to four years.[124]
  39. ^ Castro resigned, having been confirmed as United States Ambassador to Argentina.[179]
  40. ^ The secretary of state at the time of Bolin's death had been appointed, not elected, and thus not in the line of succession according to the Arizona constitution,[127] making Attorney General Babbitt governor.[185]
  41. ^ Mecham was impeached and removed from office on charges of obstruction of justice and misuse of government funds,[187] though he was later acquitted.[189]
  42. ^ Symington resigned after being convicted of bank fraud; the conviction was later overturned and he was pardoned by President Bill Clinton.[192][194]
  43. ^ Arizona adopted runoff voting after Evan Mecham won with only 43% of the vote in 1986. The 1990 election was very close, and a runoff was held on February 26, 1991, which Symington won, and he was inaugurated on March 6.[195]
  44. ^ a b Under a 1992 amendment to the constitution, governors who have served two successive terms are not eligible again until another full term has passed.[198]
  45. ^ Napolitano resigned, having been confirmed as United States Secretary of Homeland Security.[199]
  46. ^ It was a question on if Brewer, who had served part of a term and a full term, would be limited from running for a third term; she decided not to run.[203]
  47. ^ Hobbs' first term will expire January 4, 2027.

References

General
Constitution
Specific
  1. ^ "Arizona Constitution, article V, section 1 (version 1), part A". Arizona State Legislature. State of Arizona. Retrieved August 22, 2018.
  2. ^ "Arizona Constitution, article V". Arizona State Legislature. State of Arizona. Retrieved August 22, 2018.
  3. ^ "CSG Releases 2013 Governor Salaries". The Council of State Governments. June 25, 2013. Archived from the original on October 22, 2014. Retrieved November 23, 2014.
  4. ^ a b c "Const. Arizona, article V, section 4". Arizona State Legislature. State of Arizona. Retrieved August 22, 2018.
  5. ^ "Const. Arizona, article V, section 7". Arizona State Legislature. State of Arizona. Retrieved August 22, 2018.
  6. ^ "Const. Arizona, article V, section 5". Arizona State Legislature. State of Arizona. Retrieved August 22, 2018.
  7. ^ "Const. Arizona, article V, section 3". Arizona State Legislature. State of Arizona. Retrieved August 22, 2018.
  8. ^ Robinson, William Morrison (1941). Justice in Grey: A History of the Judicial System of the Confederate States of America. Harvard University Press. p. 310. Retrieved August 3, 2010.
  9. ^ McClintock 1916, pp. 142–143.
  10. ^ Colton, Ray Charles (1985). The Civil War in the Western Territories. University of Oklahoma Press. pp. 9–10. ISBN 0-8061-1902-0. Retrieved August 3, 2010.
  11. ^ a b Colton, Ray Charles (1985). The Civil War in the Western Territories. University of Oklahoma Press. pp. 122–123. ISBN 0-8061-1902-0. Retrieved August 3, 2010.
  12. ^ Cowles, Calvin Duvall (1900). The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies. United States Government Printing Office. p. 930. Retrieved August 3, 2010.
  13. ^ Heidler, David Stephen; Jeanne t. Heidler; David J. Coles (2002). Encyclopedia Of The American Civil War: A Political, Social, and Military History. W. W. Norton & Company. p. 1412. ISBN 0-393-04758-X. Retrieved August 3, 2010.
  14. ^ Wagoner 1970, p. 20.
  15. ^ U.S. Congress. Senate Exec. Journal. 37th Cong., special sess., 223, accessed January 21, 2023.
  16. ^ U.S. Congress. Senate Exec. Journal. 37th Cong., special sess., 275, accessed January 21, 2023.
  17. ^ United States Congress. "John Addison Gurley (id: G000530)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress.
  18. ^ "Death of Hon. John A. Gurley". Chicago Tribune. August 22, 1863. p. 2. Retrieved January 22, 2023.
  19. ^ a b McMullin 1984, pp. 27–28.
  20. ^ "Governor of Arizona". Chicago Tribune. August 22, 1863. p. 1. Retrieved January 22, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  21. ^ U.S. Congress. Senate Exec. Journal. 38th Cong., 1st sess., 326–327, accessed January 21, 2023.
  22. ^ U.S. Congress. Senate Exec. Journal. 38th Cong., 1st sess., 389–390, accessed January 21, 2023.
  23. ^ McGinnis, Ralph Y.; Calvin N. Smith (1994). Abraham Lincoln and the Western Territories. Rowman & Littlefield. p. 91. ISBN 0-8304-1247-6.
  24. ^ Goff 1978, pp. 26–27.
  25. ^ Goff, John S. (1985). Arizona Territorial Officials Volume III: The Delegates to Congress 1863–1912. Cave Creek, Arizona: Black Mountain Press. p. 32. OCLC 12559708.
  26. ^ McMullin 1984, pp. 28–30.
  27. ^ U.S. Congress. Senate Exec. Journal. 39th Cong., 1st sess., 675, accessed January 21, 2023.
  28. ^ U.S. Congress. Senate Exec. Journal. 39th Cong., 1st sess., 717–718, accessed January 21, 2023.
  29. ^ "Proclamation by Richard C. M'Cormick, Governor of the Territory of Arizona, Announcing His Assumption of Official Duties". Arizona Miner. July 25, 1866. p. 3. Retrieved January 22, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  30. ^ Nicolson, John (1974). The Arizona of Joseph Pratt Allyn. University of Arizona Press. p. 39. ISBN 0-8165-0386-9. Retrieved October 11, 2008. McCormick was appointed April 10 and took the oath of office July 9, 1866.
  31. ^ United States Congress. "Richard Cunningham McCormick (id: M000371)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress.
  32. ^ Goff, John S. (1985). Arizona Territorial Officials Volume III: The Delegates to Congress 1863–1912. Cave Creek, Arizona: Black Mountain Press. p. 60. OCLC 12559708.
  33. ^ "Resignation of the Governor of Arizona". The New York Times. March 3, 1869. Retrieved January 21, 2023 – via Newspapers.com. Gov. Mccormick, of Arizona, delegate elect to the Forty-first Congress, tendered his resignation as Governor of that Territory to-day.
  34. ^ a b McMullin 1984, pp. 30–32.
  35. ^ U.S. Congress. Senate Exec. Journal. 41st Cong., 1st sess., 76, accessed January 21, 2023.
  36. ^ U.S. Congress. Senate Exec. Journal. 41st Cong., 1st sess., 108, accessed January 21, 2023.
  37. ^ Goff 1978, p. 55.
  38. ^ U.S. Congress. Senate Exec. Journal. 43rd Cong., special sess., 80, accessed March 7, 2023.
  39. ^ a b U.S. Congress. Senate Exec. Journal. 45th Cong., 1st sess., 37, accessed January 21, 2023.
  40. ^ a b c McMullin 1984, pp. 32–33.
  41. ^ "Washington". Memphis Daily Appeal. April 6, 1877. p. 1. Retrieved January 23, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  42. ^ U.S. Congress. Senate Exec. Journal. 45th Cong., 1st sess., 112–113, accessed January 21, 2023.
  43. ^ Goff 1978, p. 66.
  44. ^ U.S. Congress. Senate Exec. Journal. 45th Cong., 2nd sess., 344, accessed January 23, 2023.
  45. ^ a b McMullin 1984, pp. 33–36.
  46. ^ U.S. Congress. Senate Exec. Journal. 45th Cong., 2nd sess., 344, accessed January 23, 2023.
  47. ^ U.S. Congress. Senate Exec. Journal. 45th Cong., 2nd sess., 350, accessed January 23, 2023.
  48. ^ Goff 1978, pp. 76–77.
  49. ^ a b Walker, Dale L. (1997). Rough Rider: Buckey O'Neill of Arizona. University of Nebraska Press. pp. 23–24. ISBN 0-8032-9796-3. Retrieved August 3, 2010.
  50. ^ a b McMullin 1984, pp. 37–38.
  51. ^ U.S. Congress. Senate Exec. Journal. 47th Cong., 1st sess., 251, accessed January 23, 2023.
  52. ^ U.S. Congress. Senate Exec. Journal. 47th Cong., 1st sess., 270, accessed January 23, 2023.
  53. ^ Goff 1978, p. 88.
  54. ^ "none". Arizona Weekly Enterprise. March 18, 1882. p. 2. Retrieved January 23, 2023 – via Newspapers.com. Governor F. A. Tritle today qualified before Judge French in all legal requirements, and is now governor of the Territory of Arizona.
  55. ^ Wagoner 1970, p. 221.
  56. ^ McMullin 1984, pp. 38–40.
  57. ^ "Washington". The Des Moines Register. October 16, 1885. p. 2. Retrieved January 23, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  58. ^ U.S. Congress. Senate Exec. Journal. 49th Cong., 1st sess., 55, accessed January 23, 2023.
  59. ^ U.S. Congress. Senate Exec. Journal. 49th Cong., 1st sess., 453–454, accessed January 23, 2023.
  60. ^ "Governor of Arizona". Oakland Tribune. November 3, 1885. p. 3. Retrieved January 23, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  61. ^ Goff 1978, pp. 98–99.
  62. ^ a b McMullin 1984, pp. 40–42.
  63. ^ U.S. Congress. Senate Exec. Journal. 51st Cong., special sess., 10, accessed January 23, 2023.
  64. ^ U.S. Congress. Senate Exec. Journal. 51st Cong., special sess., 49, accessed January 23, 2023.
  65. ^ "Governor Wolfley's Enthusiastic Reception". Weekly Journal-Miner. April 10, 1889. p. 3. Retrieved January 24, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  66. ^ Goff 1978, p. 112.
  67. ^ Wagoner 1970, p. 276.
  68. ^ Walker, Dale L. (1997). Rough Rider: Buckey O'Neill of Arizona. University of Nebraska Press. p. 81. ISBN 0-8032-9796-3. Retrieved August 3, 2010.
  69. ^ McMullin 1984, pp. 42–43.
  70. ^ U.S. Congress. Senate Exec. Journal. 51st Cong., 1st sess., 762, accessed January 23, 2023.
  71. ^ U.S. Congress. Senate Exec. Journal. 51st Cong., 1st sess., 775, accessed January 23, 2023.
  72. ^ "Legislature: Doings of the Bodies at Phenix". Arizona Weekly Citizen. January 24, 1891. p. 2. Retrieved January 24, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  73. ^ "Gov. Irwin Resigns". Arizona Republic. April 20, 1892. p. 1. Retrieved January 24, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  74. ^ Goff 1978, p. 127.
  75. ^ a b c McMullin 1984, pp. 43–45.
  76. ^ U.S. Congress. Senate Exec. Journal. 52nd Cong., 1st sess., 220, accessed January 23, 2023.
  77. ^ U.S. Congress. Senate Exec. Journal. 52nd Cong., 1st sess., 232, accessed January 23, 2023.
  78. ^ U.S. Congress. Senate Exec. Journal. 52nd Cong., 1st sess., 246, accessed January 23, 2023.
  79. ^ a b "Old and New: Gov. Hughes Inducted Into Office". Arizona Republic. April 14, 1893. p. 5. Retrieved January 24, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  80. ^ a b McMullin 1984, pp. 45–46.
  81. ^ U.S. Congress. Senate Exec. Journal. 53rd Cong., special sess., 446, accessed January 23, 2023.
  82. ^ U.S. Congress. Senate Exec. Journal. 53rd Cong., special sess., 454–455, accessed January 23, 2023.
  83. ^ Johnson, Rossiter; John Howard Brown (1904). The Twentieth Century Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans. The Biographical Society. Retrieved October 11, 2008.
  84. ^ "Hughes Makes His Exit". Arizona Republic. April 2, 1896. p. 1. Retrieved January 24, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  85. ^ a b McMullin 1984, pp. 46–48.
  86. ^ U.S. Congress. Senate Exec. Journal. 54th Cong., 1st sess., 209, accessed January 23, 2023.
  87. ^ U.S. Congress. Senate Exec. Journal. 54th Cong., 1st sess., 223, accessed January 23, 2023.
  88. ^ Goff 1978, pp. 154–155.
  89. ^ "Governor Franklin". Arizona Republic. April 19, 1896. p. 4. Retrieved January 24, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  90. ^ "Secretary Akers Becomes Acting Governor". The Florence Tribune. July 24, 1897. p. 2. Retrieved January 24, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  91. ^ a b McMullin 1984, pp. 48–49.
  92. ^ U.S. Congress. Senate Exec. Journal. 55th Cong., 1st sess., 112, accessed January 23, 2023.
  93. ^ U.S. Congress. Senate Exec. Journal. 55th Cong., 1st sess., 243, accessed January 23, 2023.
  94. ^ "Governor C.H.Akers". Arizona Republic. July 22, 1897. p. 1. Retrieved January 24, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  95. ^ "The Governor of Arizona". Arizona Republic. July 29, 1897. p. 8. Retrieved January 24, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  96. ^ Wagoner 1970, p. 345.
  97. ^ a b U.S. Congress. Senate Exec. Journal. 55th Cong., 3rd sess., 1010, accessed January 23, 2023.
  98. ^ U.S. Congress. Senate Exec. Journal. 55th Cong., 3rd sess., 1092–1093, accessed January 23, 2023.
  99. ^ "Governor Murphy". Arizona Republic. August 2, 1898. p. 4. Retrieved January 24, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  100. ^ McClintock 1916, p. 346.
  101. ^ Goff 1978, p. 132.
  102. ^ Goff 1978, p. 136.
  103. ^ "Resignation of Arizona's Governor". The New York Times. April 30, 1902. p. 8. Retrieved September 25, 2023.
  104. ^ a b "Governor Murphy and His Officers". Arizona Republic. July 1, 1902. p. 7. Retrieved January 24, 2023.
  105. ^ McMullin 1984, pp. 49–51.
  106. ^ U.S. Congress. Senate Exec. Journal. 57th Cong., 1st sess., 510, accessed January 23, 2023.
  107. ^ U.S. Congress. Senate Exec. Journal. 57th Cong., 1st sess., 528, accessed January 23, 2023.
  108. ^ Goff 1978, p. 178.
  109. ^ "Gov. Brodie Quits". Arizona Republic. February 15, 1905. p. 1. Retrieved January 25, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  110. ^ McClintock 1916, p. 354.
  111. ^ a b McMullin 1984, pp. 51–53.
  112. ^ U.S. Congress. Senate Exec. Journal. 58th Cong., 3rd sess., 503, accessed January 23, 2023.
  113. ^ U.S. Congress. Senate Exec. Journal. 58th Cong., 3rd sess., 538, accessed January 23, 2023.
  114. ^ "The Induction". Arizona Republic. March 8, 1905. p. 1. Retrieved January 25, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  115. ^ a b U.S. Congress. Senate Exec. Journal. 60th Cong., 2nd sess., 116, accessed January 23, 2023.
  116. ^ U.S. Congress. Senate Exec. Journal. 60th Cong., 2nd sess., 609, accessed January 23, 2023.
  117. ^ McMullin 1984, pp. 53–55.
  118. ^ U.S. Congress. Senate Exec. Journal. 61st Cong., 1st sess., 37, accessed January 23, 2023.
  119. ^ U.S. Congress. Senate Exec. Journal. 61st Cong., 1st sess., 47, accessed January 23, 2023.
  120. ^ "Judge Richard F. Sloan Is Formally Inaugurated As Governor of Arizona". Tucson Citizen. May 1, 1909. p. 1. Retrieved January 25, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  121. ^ McClintock 1916, p. 359.
  122. ^ Goff 1978, p. 199.
  123. ^ a b c AZ Const. art 5, § 1
  124. ^ a b Ralph E. Hughes v. Douglas K. Martin Archived 2008-10-14 at the Wayback Machine (PDF), (Arizona Supreme Court 2002-08-20). “Nelson involved two allegedly conflicting amendments both approved by voters in the 1968 election, to Article 5 of the Arizona Constitution. ... The other amendment, proposition 104, extended the term of offices of the executive department, including the office of state auditor, from two years to four years.”
  125. ^ Berman, David R. (1998). Arizona Politics & Government: The Quest for Autonomy, Democracy, and Development. University of Nebraska Press. p. 112. ISBN 0-8032-6146-2. Retrieved August 3, 2010.
  126. ^ AZ Const. art. 5, old § 1
  127. ^ a b c "Const. Arizona, article V, section 6". Arizona State Legislature. State of Arizona. Retrieved November 7, 2018.
  128. ^ "Meet Governor Katie Hobbs". State of Arizona. Retrieved January 20, 2023.
  129. ^ a b c d Sobel 1978, pp. 49–50.
  130. ^ a b c d e "George Wylie Hunt". National Governors Association. Retrieved January 20, 2023.
  131. ^ "Bright Folds of Old Glory Have New Star". Arizona Republic. February 15, 1912. p. 1. Retrieved July 31, 2023.
  132. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r Kallenbach 1977, pp. 46–47.
  133. ^ a b Sobel 1978, pp. 50–51.
  134. ^ "Great Throng Approves Campbell's Inaugural". Arizona Republic. January 2, 1917. p. 1. Retrieved July 31, 2023.
  135. ^ "Gov. Hunt Refuses to Yield Office". New York Times. January 2, 1917. p. 4.
  136. ^ "Gov. Hunt Put Out of Office by Court". New York Times. January 28, 1917. p. 14.
  137. ^ "Court Declares Hunt Governor of Arizona". New York Times. December 23, 1917. p. 5.
  138. ^ "Gubernatorial Change Will Bring Executive Chair As Christmas Gift to Mr. Hunt". Arizona Republic. December 25, 1917. p. 1. Retrieved July 31, 2023.
  139. ^ "Campbell Again Is Arizona Governor". Arizona Republic. January 7, 1919. p. 1. Retrieved July 31, 2023.
  140. ^ "Hunt's Inauguration Marked by Simplicity; Economy Is Promised". Arizona Republic. January 2, 1923. p. 1. Retrieved July 31, 2023.
  141. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 51–52.
  142. ^ "John C. Phillips". National Governors Association. Retrieved January 20, 2023.
  143. ^ "Inaugural of Phillips Marked by Simplicity". Arizona Republic. January 8, 1929. p. 1. Retrieved July 31, 2023.
  144. ^ "Grand Old Man of Arizona Is Back in Office". Arizona Daily Star. Associated Press. January 6, 1931. p. 1. Retrieved July 31, 2023.
  145. ^ "Hunt Concedes Moeur Victory". The Los Angeles Times. Los Angeles. Associated Press. September 16, 1932. p. 2. Retrieved July 13, 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  146. ^ a b Sobel 1978, p. 52.
  147. ^ "Benjamin Baker Moeur". National Governors Association. Retrieved January 20, 2023.
  148. ^ "Arizona's Governor Is Seated". Arizona Republic. January 3, 1933. p. 1. Retrieved July 31, 2023.
  149. ^ Sobel 1978, p. 53.
  150. ^ "Rawghlie Clement Stanford". National Governors Association. Retrieved January 20, 2023.
  151. ^ "Sanford Stresses Problems". Arizona Republic. January 5, 1937. p. 1. Retrieved July 31, 2023.
  152. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 53–54.
  153. ^ "Robert Taylor Jones". National Governors Association. Retrieved January 20, 2023.
  154. ^ "R.T. Jones Becomes Governor". Arizona Republic. January 3, 1939. p. 1. Retrieved July 31, 2023.
  155. ^ "Talmadge, Once New Deal Foe, Re-Elected in Georgia". The San Francisco Examiner. Associated Press. September 12, 1920. p. 9. Retrieved July 13, 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  156. ^ Sobel 1978, p. 54.
  157. ^ "Sidney Preston Osborn". National Governors Association. Retrieved January 20, 2023.
  158. ^ "Big Program Is Mapped by New Governor". Arizona Republic. January 7, 1941. p. 1. Retrieved July 31, 2023.
  159. ^ a b Sobel 1978, p. 55.
  160. ^ "Daniel E. Garvey". National Governors Association. Retrieved January 20, 2023.
  161. ^ "Long Seige of Illness Ends Early Today". Arizona Daily Sun. Associated Press. May 25, 1948. p. 1. Retrieved July 31, 2023.
  162. ^ "Woman Pulls Upset in Arizona Contest". The Los Angeles Times. Los Angeles. Associated Press. September 14, 1950. p. 19. Retrieved July 13, 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  163. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 55–56.
  164. ^ "John Howard Pyle". National Governors Association. Retrieved January 20, 2023.
  165. ^ "Pyle Confident of Harmonious Relationship With Lawmakers". Arizona Daily Star. Associated Press. January 2, 1951. p. 1A. Retrieved July 31, 2023.
  166. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 56–57.
  167. ^ "Ernest William McFarland". National Governors Association. Retrieved January 20, 2023.
  168. ^ Nuckolls, Claiborne (January 4, 1955). "Inaugural Attended by 3,000". Arizona Republic. p. 1. Retrieved July 31, 2023.
  169. ^ Sobel 1978, p. 57.
  170. ^ "Paul Jones Fannin". National Governors Association. Retrieved January 20, 2023.
  171. ^ Avery, Ben (January 6, 1959). "Sworn In As 11th Governor". Arizona Republic. p. 1. Retrieved July 31, 2023.
  172. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 57–58.
  173. ^ "Samuel Pearson Goddard". National Governors Association. Retrieved January 20, 2023.
  174. ^ King, Bill (January 5, 1965). "Governor Sworn In by Udall". Arizona Republic. p. 1. Retrieved July 31, 2023.
  175. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 58–59.
  176. ^ "John "Jack" R. Williams". National Governors Association. Retrieved January 20, 2023.
  177. ^ Wynn, Bernie (January 3, 1967). "Jack Williams Becomes 13th State Governor". Arizona Republic. p. 1. Retrieved July 31, 2023.
  178. ^ Lydon, Christopher (November 3, 1974). "Democrats Likely to Make Larger Than Usual Gain". The New York Times. Retrieved January 20, 2023. The Democrat, Raul H. Castro, who came within 8,000 votes of beating Gov. Jack Williams in 1970, is narrowly favored this year to defeat Russell Williams, a conservative Republican businessman who is no kin to the incumbent.
  179. ^ a b Sobel 1978, p. 59.
  180. ^ "Raul H. Castro". National Governors Association. Retrieved January 20, 2023.
  181. ^ Bolles, Don (January 7, 1975). "Castro Takes Oath As 14th Governor". Arizona Republic. p. 1. Retrieved July 31, 2023.
  182. ^ Sobel 1978, p. 60.
  183. ^ a b "Wesley Bolin". National Governors Association. Retrieved January 20, 2023.
  184. ^ "Bolin Becomes State's 15th Governor". Arizona Daily Sun. Associated Press. October 20, 1977. p. A1. Retrieved July 31, 2023.
  185. ^ a b c "Bruce Edward Babbitt". National Governors Association. Retrieved January 20, 2023.
  186. ^ "Gov. Bolin Dies at 69". Arizona Republic. March 5, 1978. p. A1. Retrieved July 31, 2023.
  187. ^ a b c "Evan Mecham". National Governors Association. Retrieved January 20, 2023.
  188. ^ Harris, Don; Stanton, Sam (January 6, 1987). "New Governor Declares War on Drugs, Porn". Arizona Republic. p. A1. Retrieved July 31, 2023.
  189. ^ Sullivan, Patricia (February 23, 2008). "Evan Mecham, 83; Was Removed as Arizona Governor". Washington Post. Retrieved November 24, 2018.
  190. ^ a b "Rose Mofford". National Governors Association. Retrieved January 20, 2023.
  191. ^ Asseo, Laurie (April 5, 1988). "Senate Convicts, Ousts Mecham". Arizona Daily Sun. Associated Press. p. 1. Retrieved July 31, 2023.
  192. ^ a b c "J. Fife Symington". National Governors Association. Retrieved January 20, 2023.
  193. ^ Pitzl, Mary Jo (March 7, 1991). "New Governor Vows Aid to Families, Kids". Arizona Republic. p. A1. Retrieved July 31, 2023.
  194. ^ Purdum, Todd S. (September 4, 1997). "Arizona Governor Convicted Of Fraud and Will Step Down". The New York Times. Retrieved October 11, 2008.
  195. ^ Mullaney, Marie Marmo (1994). Biographical Directory of the Governors of the United States, 1988–1994. Greenwood Publishing Group. pp. 29–30. ISBN 0-313-28312-5. Retrieved October 11, 2008.
  196. ^ a b "Jane Dee Hull". National Governors Association. Retrieved January 20, 2023.
  197. ^ Mattern, Hal (September 6, 1997). "Hull Becomes Governor As Symington Era Ends". Arizona Republic. p. A1. Retrieved July 31, 2023.
  198. ^ "Ariz. Const. amend. 176". www.stateconstitutions.umd.edu. Retrieved December 14, 2023.
  199. ^ a b c "Janet Napolitano". National Governors Association. Retrieved January 20, 2023.
  200. ^ Scutari, Chip; Leonard, Christina (January 7, 2003). "Napolitano Optimistic As She Becomes State's 21st Governor". Arizona Republic. p. A1. Retrieved July 31, 2023.
  201. ^ a b "Jan Brewer". National Governors Association. Retrieved January 20, 2023.
  202. ^ Benson, Matthew (January 21, 2009). "With New Job Confirmed, Napolitano Resigns Office". Arizona Republic. p. A10. Retrieved July 31, 2023.
  203. ^ Fischer, Howard (March 13, 2014). "Gov. Brewer won't run for re-election". Arizona Daily Sun. p. A1. Retrieved July 31, 2023.
  204. ^ a b "Doug Ducey". National Governors Association. Retrieved January 20, 2023.
  205. ^ Nowicki, Dan (January 6, 2015). "Ducey on Day 1: Tough Talk on Taxes, Budget". Arizona Republic. p. A1. Retrieved July 31, 2023.
  206. ^ a b "Katie Hobbs". National Governors Association. Retrieved January 20, 2023.
  207. ^ Barchenger, Stacey (January 3, 2023). "Hobbs, Five Other State Leaders Take Oath of Office in a Historic Transfer of Power". Arizona Republic. p. 1A. Retrieved July 31, 2023.