The governor of Oregon is the head of government of the U.S. state of Oregon.

List of governors

The Oregon Country was obtained by the United States on January 30, 1819,[1] as a shared region with the United Kingdom. The Oregon Treaty ended the sharing and formally established the borders on June 15, 1846. [2]

The Champoeg Meetings, including a constitutional committee, held from February 1841 until May 1843, served as a de facto government before the government was officially established. While early attempts at establishing a government had been unsuccessful because of discontent between English American and French Canadian settlers over the question of whom they should choose as governor, several other officers were elected at these meetings, including Ira Babcock as Supreme Judge. For lack of a government, the Supreme Judge also received executive and legislative duties. [3][4]

The meetings at Champoeg led up to the first constitution of the Oregon Country and several petitions for U.S. territorial status. The resulting acts created a provisional government on July 5, 1843. The first leaders of this government were an elected three-person Executive Committee. Later, George Abernethy was elected governor, and served from June 3, 1845, to March 3, 1849, though this government was never recognized by the federal government.

Oregon Territory

The region was organized as Oregon Territory on August 14, 1848.[5] During its history it had five governors appointed by the president of the United States.

Governors of the Territory of Oregon
No. Governor Term in office[a] Appointing President
1 Joseph Lane
(1801–1881)
[6]
August 18, 1848[b]

June 18, 1850
(successor appointed)[c]
James K. Polk
2 John P. Gaines
(1795–1857)
[11]
October 2, 1849[d]

May 16, 1853
(successor appointed)
Millard Fillmore
3 Joseph Lane
(1801–1881)
[6]
May 16, 1853[e]

May 18, 1853
(resigned)[f]
Franklin Pierce
4 John Wesley Davis
(1799–1859)
[22]
September 6, 1853[g]

August 1, 1854
(resigned)[h]
Franklin Pierce
5 George Law Curry
(1820–1878)
[21]
November 1, 1854[i]

July 8, 1858
(statehood)
Franklin Pierce

State of Oregon

The state of Oregon was admitted to the Union on February 14, 1859.[26]

The 1857 Constitution of Oregon provided for the election of a governor every four years, to serve no more than eight out of any twelve years.[27] This length and limit have never been changed. It is one of the few states without a lieutenant governor. The office would devolve upon the secretary of state upon vacancy[28] until a 1920 amendment put the president of the Senate first in the line of succession,[29] and a 1972 amendment returned the secretary of state to the front.[30]

Governors of the State of Oregon
No. Governor Term in office Party Election
1   John Whiteaker
(1820–1902)
[31][32]
July 8, 1858[j]

September 10, 1862
(did not run)
Democratic[33] 1858
2   A. C. Gibbs
(1825–1886)
[34][35]
September 10, 1862[36]

September 12, 1866
(did not run)
Republican[33] 1862
3 George Lemuel Woods
(1832–1890)
[37][38]
September 12, 1866[39]

September 14, 1870
(did not run)
Republican[33] 1866
4 La Fayette Grover
(1823–1911)
[40][41]
September 14, 1870[42]

February 1, 1877
(resigned)[k]
Democratic[33] 1870
1874
5 Stephen F. Chadwick
(1825–1895)
[43][44]
February 1, 1877[45]

September 11, 1878
(did not run)[43]
Democratic[33] Succeeded from
secretary of
state
6 W. W. Thayer
(1827–1899)
[46][47]
September 11, 1878[48]

September 13, 1882
(did not run)[46]
Democratic[33] 1878
7 Zenas Ferry Moody
(1832–1917)
[49][50]
September 13, 1882[51]

January 12, 1887
(did not run)[49]
Republican[33] 1882
8 Sylvester Pennoyer
(1831–1902)
[52][53]
January 12, 1887[54]

January 16, 1895
(term-limited)[l]
Democratic[m] 1886
1890
9 William Paine Lord
(1838–1911)
[56][57]
January 16, 1895[58]

January 10, 1899
(lost nomination)[56]
Republican[33] 1894
10 Theodore Thurston Geer
(1851–1924)
[59][60]
January 10, 1899[61]

January 14, 1903
(did not run)
Republican[33] 1898
11 George Earle Chamberlain
(1854–1928)
[62][63]
January 14, 1903[64]

March 1, 1909
(resigned)[n]
Democratic[33] 1902
1906
12 Frank W. Benson
(1858–1911)
[65][66]
March 1, 1909[67]

June 16, 1910
(resigned)[o]
Republican[33] Succeeded from
secretary of
state
13 Jay Bowerman
(1876–1957)
[68][69]
June 16, 1910[70]

January 10, 1911
(lost election)
Republican[33] Succeeded from
president of
the Senate
14 Oswald West
(1873–1960)
[71][72]
January 10, 1911[73]

January 12, 1915
(did not run)[71]
Democratic[33] 1910
15 James Withycombe
(1854–1919)
[74][75]
January 12, 1915[76]

March 3, 1919
(died in office)
Republican[33] 1914
1918
16 Ben W. Olcott
(1872–1952)
[77][78]
March 3, 1919[79]

January 8, 1923
(lost election)
Republican[33] Succeeded from
secretary of
state
17 Walter M. Pierce
(1861–1954)
[80][81]
January 8, 1923[82]

January 10, 1927
(lost election)
Democratic[33] 1922
18 I. L. Patterson
(1859–1929)
[83][84]
January 10, 1927[85]

December 21, 1929
(died in office)
Republican[33] 1926
19 Albin Walter Norblad Sr.
(1881–1960)
[86][87]
December 21, 1929[88]

January 12, 1931
(lost nomination)[p]
Republican[33] Succeeded from
President of
the Senate
20 Julius Meier
(1874–1937)
[89][90]
January 12, 1931[91]

January 14, 1935
(did not run)[89]
Independent[33] 1930
21 Charles Martin
(1863–1946)
[92][93]
January 14, 1935[94]

January 9, 1939
(lost nomination)[q]
Democratic[33] 1934
22 Charles A. Sprague
(1887–1969)
[95][96]
January 9, 1939[97]

January 13, 1943
(lost nomination)[95]
Republican[33] 1938
23 Earl Snell
(1895–1947)
[98][99]
January 13, 1943[100]

October 28, 1947
(died in office)
Republican[33] 1942
1946
24 John Hubert Hall
(1899–1970)
[101][102]
October 28, 1947[r]

January 10, 1949
(lost nomination)[101]
Republican[33] Succeeded from
speaker of
the House
[s]
25 Douglas McKay
(1893–1959)
[104][105]
January 10, 1949[106]

December 17, 1952
(resigned)[t]
Republican[33] 1948
(special)
1950
26 Paul L. Patterson
(1900–1956)
[107][108]
December 17, 1952[109]

January 31, 1956
(died in office)
Republican[33] Succeeded from
president of
the Senate
1954
27 Elmo Smith
(1909–1968)
[110][111]
January 31, 1956[u]

January 14, 1957
(lost election)
Republican[33] Succeeded from
president of
the Senate
28 Robert D. Holmes
(1909–1976)
[113][114]
January 14, 1957[115]

January 12, 1959
(lost election)
Democratic[33] 1956
(special)
29 Mark Hatfield
(1922–2011)
[116][117]
January 12, 1959[118]

January 9, 1967
(term-limited)[l]
Republican[33] 1958
1962
30 Tom McCall
(1913–1983)
[119][120]
January 9, 1967[121]

January 13, 1975
(term-limited)[l]
Republican[33] 1966
1970
31 Robert W. Straub
(1920–2002)
[122][123]
January 13, 1975[124]

January 8, 1979
(lost election)
Democratic[33] 1974
32 Victor Atiyeh
(1923–2014)
[125]
January 8, 1979[126]

January 12, 1987
(term-limited)[l]
Republican[125] 1978
1982
33 Neil Goldschmidt
(b. 1940)
[127]
January 12, 1987[128]

January 14, 1991
(did not run)
Democratic[127] 1986
34 Barbara Roberts
(b. 1936)
[129]
January 14, 1991[130]

January 9, 1995
(did not run)
Democratic[129] 1990
35 John Kitzhaber
(b. 1947)
[131]
January 9, 1995[132]

January 13, 2003
(term-limited)[l]
Democratic[131] 1994
1998
36 Ted Kulongoski
(b. 1940)
[133]
January 13, 2003[134]

January 10, 2011
(term-limited)[l]
Democratic[133] 2002
2006
37 John Kitzhaber
(b. 1947)
[131]
January 10, 2011[135]

February 18, 2015
(resigned)[v]
Democratic[131] 2010
2014
38 Kate Brown
(b. 1960)
[137]
February 18, 2015[138]

January 9, 2023
(term-limited)[l]
Democratic[137] Succeeded from
secretary of
state
2016
(special)
2018
39 Tina Kotek
(b. 1966)
[139]
January 9, 2023[140]

Incumbent[w]
Democratic[139] 2022

Notes

  1. ^ The range given is from the date the governor was confirmed by the Senate, or appointed by the President during a Senate recess, to the date the governor's successor was confirmed, unless noted.
  2. ^ James Shields was nominated and confirmed by the Senate on August 14, 1848;[7] however, he declined the post.[8] Lane was then appointed on August 18, 1848, during a Senate recess;[6] nominated on December 12;[8] and confirmed by the Senate on December 20.[9] He took the oath of office in the territory on March 3, 1849.[6]
  3. ^ Lane's successor Gaines was confirmed by the Senate on October 2, 1849. However, it took him nine months to reach the territory; Lane had received no official notice of his replacement, and continued serving as governor until he resigned on June 18, 1850.[10] Territorial Secretary Kintzing Prichette acted as governor until Gaines arrived.[6]
  4. ^ Joseph G. Marshall was appointed on August 9, 1849, during a Senate recess,[12][13] but declined the post.[12][14] Some sources say that Abraham Lincoln was then appointed but declined,[15][11] but the Territorial Papers have no record of a formal appointment.[12] Gaines was appointed on October 2, 1849, during a Senate recess;[12] nominated on December 21, 1849;[16] and confirmed by the Senate on September 9, 1850.[17] He arrived in the territory in August 1850.[11]
  5. ^ Lane was nominated on March 15, 1853,[18] and confirmed by the Senate on March 16.[19]
  6. ^ Lane resigned three days after taking office, his goal of replacing the current unpopular governor complete, to return to his seat in the United States House of Representatives.[20][6] Territorial Secretary George Law Curry acted as governor until his successor arrived.[21]
  7. ^ Davis was appointed on September 6, 1853, during a Senate recess,[12] and nominated and confirmed by the Senate on February 4, 1854.[23]
  8. ^ McMullin says Davis resigned, but no further details are given.[22] Territorial Secretary George Law Curry acted as governor until he was appointed successor.[21]
  9. ^ Curry was appointed on November 1, 1854, during a Senate recess;[21] nominated on July 7, 1856,[24] but was not confirmed before the Senate session expired; and nominated and confirmed by the Senate on August 22, 1856.[25] The territorial papers also note an appointment or confirmation on March 5, 1855, but no other information has been found on this date.[12]
  10. ^ Whiteaker was sworn in on July 8, 1858, eight months before Oregon formally became a state.[31]
  11. ^ Grover resigned, having been elected to the United States Senate.[40]
  12. ^ a b c d e f g Governors are ineligible to serve more than eight years in any period of twelve years.[55]
  13. ^ Pennoyer was nominated by the Democratic party in 1886, by the Democrats and Union Party in 1890, and he joined the Populist Party in 1892.[52]
  14. ^ Chamberlain resigned, having been elected to the United States Senate.[62]
  15. ^ Benson resigned due to ill health.[65]
  16. ^ Norblad lost the Republican nomination to George W. Joseph; however, Joseph died a month later, and Norblad, who had come in second to Joseph, refused to be considered.[86]
  17. ^ Martin lost the Democratic nomination to Henry L. Hess.[92]
  18. ^ Hall technically became governor upon the death of Governor Snell on October 28, though he took a formal oath of office on October 30 after Snell's body was identified.[103]
  19. ^ Governor Snell, President of the Senate Marshall Cornett, and Secretary of State Robert S. Farrell Jr. died in a plane crash on October 28, 1947; the next in the line of succession was Speaker of the House Hall.[98]
  20. ^ McKay resigned, in anticipation of being nominated for United States Secretary of the Interior.[104]
  21. ^ Patterson died late on January 31, and Smith took the oath of office the morning of February 1.[112]
  22. ^ Kitzhaber resigned due to an ethics scandal.[136]
  23. ^ Kotek's first term will expire on January 11, 2027.

References

General
  • "Former Oregon Governors". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 11, 2023.
  • McMullin, Thomas A. (1984). Biographical directory of American territorial governors. Westport, CT : Meckler. ISBN 978-0-930466-11-4. Retrieved January 19, 2023.
  • Sobel, Robert (1978). Biographical directory of the governors of the United States, 1789-1978, Vol. III. Meckler Books. ISBN 9780930466008. Retrieved March 25, 2023.
  • Dubin, Michael J. (2003). United States Gubernatorial Elections, 1776-1860: The Official Results by State and County. McFarland. ISBN 978-0-7864-1439-0.
  • Dubin, Michael J. (2014). United States Gubernatorial Elections, 1861-1911: The Official Results by State and County. McFarland. ISBN 978-0-7864-5646-8.
  • Kallenbach, Joseph Ernest (1977). American State Governors, 1776-1976. Oceana Publications. ISBN 978-0-379-00665-0. Retrieved September 23, 2023.
  • Glashan, Roy R. (1979). American Governors and Gubernatorial Elections, 1775-1978. Meckler Books. ISBN 978-0-930466-17-6.
  • "Governor Records". Oregon State Archives. Retrieved July 15, 2010.
  • "Our Campaigns - Governor of Oregon - History". www.ourcampaigns.com. Retrieved July 25, 2023.
Specific
  1. ^ Stat. 248
  2. ^ "Text of "Treaty with Great Britain, in Regard to Limits Westward of the Rocky Mountains"". The Avalon Project at Yale Law School. Archived from the original on April 19, 2009. Retrieved August 4, 2006.
  3. ^ DR. IRA L. BABCOCK, biography from Oregon Government, retrieved 15 May 2017
  4. ^ A History of Oregon, 1792-1849, retrieved 15 May 2017
  5. ^ Stat. 323
  6. ^ a b c d e f McMullin 1984, pp. 275–276.
  7. ^ U.S. Congress. Senate Exec. Journal. 30th Cong., 1st sess., 483, accessed June 5, 2023.
  8. ^ a b U.S. Congress. Senate Exec. Journal. 30th Cong., 2nd sess., 6, accessed June 5, 2023.
  9. ^ U.S. Congress. Senate Exec. Journal. 30th Cong., 2nd sess., 10, accessed June 5, 2023.
  10. ^ Forsyth, Marjorie Phyllis (January 1, 1942). The Public Career of Joseph Lane (Master of Arts (MA), History thesis). Butler University. p. 14.
  11. ^ a b c McMullin 1984, pp. 276–278.
  12. ^ a b c d e f The Territorial Papers of the United States: Volume I: General. United States Government Publishing Office. 1934. p. 26.
  13. ^ "Governor of Oregon". The Baltimore Sun. August 10, 1849. p. 4. Retrieved June 8, 2023.
  14. ^ "Declined". The Brooklyn Daily Eagle. August 29, 1849. p. 2. Retrieved June 8, 2023.
  15. ^ "Governor of Oregon Appointed". The Weekly Mississippian. October 12, 1849. p. 1. Retrieved June 8, 2023.
  16. ^ U.S. Congress. Senate Exec. Journal. 31st Cong., 1st sess., 98, accessed June 5, 2023.
  17. ^ U.S. Congress. Senate Exec. Journal. 31st Cong., 1st sess., 230, accessed June 5, 2023.
  18. ^ U.S. Congress. Senate Exec. Journal. 33rd Cong., special sess., 67, accessed June 5, 2023.
  19. ^ U.S. Congress. Senate Exec. Journal. 33rd Cong., special sess., 74, accessed June 5, 2023.
  20. ^ Forsyth, Marjorie Phyllis (January 1, 1942). The Public Career of Joseph Lane (Master of Arts (MA), History thesis). Butler University. pp. 31–32.
  21. ^ a b c d McMullin 1984, pp. 279–281.
  22. ^ a b McMullin 1984, pp. 278–279.
  23. ^ U.S. Congress. Senate Exec. Journal. 33rd Cong., 1st sess., 229, 234, accessed June 5, 2023.
  24. ^ U.S. Congress. Senate Exec. Journal. 34th Cong., 1st sess., 113, accessed June 5, 2023.
  25. ^ U.S. Congress. Senate Exec. Journal. 34th Cong., 2nd sess., 154–155, accessed June 5, 2023.
  26. ^ 11 Stat. 383
  27. ^ OR Const. art. V, § 1
  28. ^ OR Const. art. V, § 8, orig.
  29. ^ "Oregon Line of Sucession to the Governorship, Measure 5 (May 1920)". Ballotpedia. Retrieved June 9, 2023.
  30. ^ "Oregon Gubernatorial Line of Succession, Measure 8 (1972)". Ballotpedia. Retrieved June 9, 2023.
  31. ^ a b Sobel 1978, pp. 1261–1262.
  32. ^ "John Whiteaker". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 8, 2023.
  33. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad Kallenbach 1977, pp. 482–484.
  34. ^ Sobel 1978, p. 1262.
  35. ^ "Addison C. Gibbs". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 8, 2023.
  36. ^ "Inaugural of Governor Gibbs". Morning Oregonian. September 12, 1862. p. 2. Retrieved June 9, 2023.
  37. ^ Sobel 1978, p. 1263.
  38. ^ "George Lemuel Woods". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 8, 2023.
  39. ^ "none". Morning Oregonian. September 14, 1866. p. 2. Retrieved June 9, 2023. Judge Shattuck administered the oath to the Governor elect. Governor Woods then delivered his inaugural address...
  40. ^ a b Sobel 1978, pp. 1263–1264.
  41. ^ "Lafayette Grover". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 8, 2023.
  42. ^ "Democratic Oregon". Albany Democrat. September 16, 1870. p. 2. Retrieved June 9, 2023.
  43. ^ a b Sobel 1978, pp. 1264–1265.
  44. ^ "Stephen Fowler Chadwick". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 8, 2023.
  45. ^ "Proclamation by the Governor". The Albany Register. February 16, 1877. p. 2. Retrieved June 9, 2023.
  46. ^ a b Sobel 1978, pp. 1265–1266.
  47. ^ "William Wallace Thayer". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 8, 2023.
  48. ^ "Oregon Legislature". Morning Oregonian. September 12, 1878. p. 3. Retrieved June 9, 2023.
  49. ^ a b Sobel 1978, pp. 1266–1267.
  50. ^ "Zenas Perry Moody". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 8, 2023.
  51. ^ "Salem Correspondence". Albany Democrat. September 15, 1882. p. 2. Retrieved June 9, 2023.
  52. ^ a b Sobel 1978, pp. 1267–1268.
  53. ^ "Sylvester Pennoyer". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 8, 2023.
  54. ^ "Inauguration of Sylvester Pennoyer as Governor". Statesman Journal. January 13, 1887. p. 1. Retrieved June 9, 2023.
  55. ^ "Ore. Const. art. V, § 1". Retrieved December 20, 2023.
  56. ^ a b Sobel 1978, pp. 1268–1269.
  57. ^ "William Paine Lord". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 8, 2023.
  58. ^ "Mill Begins to Grind". The Morning Astorian. Associated Press. January 17, 1895. p. 1. Retrieved June 11, 2023.
  59. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1269–1270.
  60. ^ "Theodore T. Geer". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 8, 2023.
  61. ^ "Governor Installed". The Morning Astorian. January 11, 1899. p. 1. Retrieved June 11, 2023.
  62. ^ a b Sobel 1978, pp. 1270–1271.
  63. ^ "George Earle Chamberlain". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 8, 2023.
  64. ^ "Geo. E. Chamberlain Inaugurated Governor of the Oregon People". The Oregon Daily Journal. January 14, 1903. p. 1. Retrieved June 11, 2023.
  65. ^ a b Sobel 1978, pp. 1271–1272.
  66. ^ "Frank W. Benson". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 8, 2023.
  67. ^ "F.W. Benson Became Oregon's Governor This Morning". The Capital Journal. March 1, 1909. p. 1. Retrieved June 11, 2023.
  68. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1272–1273.
  69. ^ "Jay Bowerman". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 8, 2023.
  70. ^ "Bowerman Is Now Governor". Statesman Journal. June 17, 1910. p. 1. Retrieved June 11, 2023.
  71. ^ a b Sobel 1978, pp. 1273–1274.
  72. ^ "Oswald West". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 8, 2023.
  73. ^ "Oswald West Steps In With Pledge of Square Deal". Statesman Journal. January 11, 1911. p. 1. Retrieved June 11, 2023.
  74. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1274–1275.
  75. ^ "James Withycombe". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 8, 2023.
  76. ^ "Withycombe Is Governor of the State". The Oregon Daily Journal. January 12, 1915. p. 1. Retrieved June 11, 2023.
  77. ^ Sobel 1978, p. 1275.
  78. ^ "Ben Olcott". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 8, 2023.
  79. ^ "Governor of Oregon Is Called". The Eugene Guard. March 4, 1919. p. 1. Retrieved June 11, 2023.
  80. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1276–1277.
  81. ^ "Walter Marcus Pierce". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 8, 2023.
  82. ^ "Gov. Pierce Inaugurated". Statesman Journal. January 9, 1923. p. 1. Retrieved June 11, 2023.
  83. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1277–1278.
  84. ^ "Isaac Lee Patterson". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 8, 2023.
  85. ^ "Patterson Takes Oath of Office". Medford Mail Tribune. Associated Press. January 10, 1927. p. 1. Retrieved June 11, 2023.
  86. ^ a b Sobel 1978, pp. 1278–1279.
  87. ^ "Albin Walter Norblad". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 8, 2023.
  88. ^ "Governor Patterson Dead". The Klamath News. United Press. December 22, 1929. p. 1. Retrieved June 11, 2023.
  89. ^ a b Sobel 1978, pp. 1279–1280.
  90. ^ "Julius L. Meier". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 8, 2023.
  91. ^ "Meier Inaugurated 20th Governor as Hundreds Jam Hall". Statesman Journal. January 13, 1931. p. 1. Retrieved June 12, 2023.
  92. ^ a b Sobel 1978, pp. 1280–1281.
  93. ^ "Charles Henry Martin". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 8, 2023.
  94. ^ "Martin Steps Into Oregon's Governorship". The Klamath News. United Press. January 15, 1935. p. 1. Retrieved June 12, 2023.
  95. ^ a b Sobel 1978, pp. 1281–1282.
  96. ^ "Charles Arthur Sprague". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 8, 2023.
  97. ^ Applegate, Richard (January 9, 1939). "Taxation, Relief Stressed In Sprague's Message". Albany Democrat-Herald. United Press. p. 1. Retrieved June 12, 2023.
  98. ^ a b Sobel 1978, pp. 1282–1283.
  99. ^ "Earl Wilcox Snell". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 8, 2023.
  100. ^ Bremer, Arthur (January 13, 1943). "Snell Sworn In As Oregon's New Governor". Albany Democrat-Herald. United Press. p. 1. Retrieved June 12, 2023.
  101. ^ a b Sobel 1978, pp. 1283–1284.
  102. ^ "John Hubert Hall". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 8, 2023.
  103. ^ "Hall Assumes Governorship". Herald and News. Associated Press. October 30, 1947. p. 1. Retrieved June 12, 2023.
  104. ^ a b Sobel 1978, pp. 1284–1285.
  105. ^ "James Douglas McKay". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 8, 2023.
  106. ^ Olson, James D. (January 10, 1949). "Douglas McKay Takes Oath as 25th Governor". The Capital Journal. p. 1. Retrieved June 12, 2023.
  107. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1285–1286.
  108. ^ "Paul Linton Patterson". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 8, 2023.
  109. ^ "Paul Patterson Becomes Oregon Governor Today". Corvallis Gazette-Times. United Press. December 17, 1952. p. 1. Retrieved June 12, 2023.
  110. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1286–1287.
  111. ^ "Elmo Everett Smith". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 8, 2023.
  112. ^ Olson, James D. (February 1, 1956). "Patterson Death Shocks State; Senate Head Succeeds to Post". The Capital Journal. p. 1. Retrieved June 12, 2023.
  113. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1287–1288.
  114. ^ "Robert Denison Holmes". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 8, 2023.
  115. ^ Olson, James D. (January 14, 1957). "Holmes Takes Oath as First Demo Governor in 22 Years". The Capital Journal. p. 1. Retrieved June 12, 2023.
  116. ^ Sobel 1978, p. 1288.
  117. ^ "Mark Odom Hatfield". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 8, 2023.
  118. ^ "Hatfield Takes Oath Before Joint Session". The Eugene Guard. United Press International. January 12, 1959. p. 1A. Retrieved June 12, 2023.
  119. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1288–1289.
  120. ^ "Thomas Lawson McCall". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 8, 2023.
  121. ^ Jepsen, Don (January 9, 1967). "McCall Sworn In; Calls for Income Tax Hike". The World. United Press International. p. 1. Retrieved June 12, 2023.
  122. ^ Sobel 1978, p. 1289.
  123. ^ "Robert William Straub". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 8, 2023.
  124. ^ "31st Governor". Statesman Journal. January 14, 1975. p. 1. Retrieved June 12, 2023.
  125. ^ a b "Victor G. Atiyeh". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 8, 2023.
  126. ^ Rosenberg, Martin (January 8, 1979). "Atiyeh Issues a Challenge to State". The Capital Journal. p. 1A. Retrieved June 12, 2023.
  127. ^ a b "Neil Goldschmidt". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 8, 2023.
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