Governor of South Carolina
Incumbent
Henry McMaster
since January 24, 2017
StyleHis Excellency
Term lengthFour years, renewable once consecutively
Websitegovernor.sc.gov

The governor of South Carolina is the head of government of South Carolina and serves as commander-in-chief of the U.S. state's military forces. The current governor is Henry McMaster.

Governors

For the period before independence, see List of colonial governors of South Carolina.

South Carolina was one of the original Thirteen Colonies and was admitted as a state on May 23, 1788.[1] Before it declared its independence, South Carolina was a colony of the Kingdom of Great Britain. It seceded from the Union on December 20, 1860,[2] and was a founding member of the Confederate States of America on February 4, 1861.[3] Following the end of the American Civil War, South Carolina during Reconstruction was part of the Second Military District, which exerted some control over governor appointments and elections. South Carolina was readmitted to the Union on July 9, 1868.[4]

Under the first constitution of South Carolina, a president of the state was elected for a term of two years, who then could not run again until four years had passed. The 1865 constitution briefly increased terms to four years, but that was changed in the 1868 constitution back to two years, with no term limit. An amendment in 1926 increased term lengths to four years, but limited governors to not being able to succeed themselves; an amendment in 1981 allowed governors to succeed themselves once. The 1776 constitution created the office of vice-president, renamed to lieutenant governor in 1778, to succeed to the governorship should it become vacant.[5]

Governors of the State of South Carolina
No. Governor[a] Term in office Party Election Lt. Governor[b][c]
31   John Rutledge
(1739–1800)
[6]
March 26, 1776[7]

March 6, 1778
(resigned)[d]
None[9] 1776   Henry Laurens
32 Rawlins Lowndes
(1721–1800)
[10]
March 6, 1778[7]

January 9, 1779
(did not run)
None[9] 1778[e] James Parsons
31 John Rutledge
(1739–1800)
[6]
January 9, 1779[7]

January 31, 1782
(term-limited)[f][g]
None[9] 1779 Thomas Bee
Christopher Gadsden
33 John Mathews
(1744–1802)
[12]
January 31, 1782[7]

February 5, 1783
(did not run)
None[9] 1782[h] Richard Hutson
34 Benjamin Guerard
(1740–1788)
[13]
February 5, 1783[14]

February 10, 1785
(term-limited)[g]
None[9] 1783 Richard Beresford
Vacant
William Moultrie
35 William Moultrie
(1730–1805)
[15][16]
February 10, 1785[17]

February 21, 1787
(term-limited)[g]
None[9] 1785 Charles Drayton
36 Thomas Pinckney
(1750–1828)
[18]
February 21, 1787[19]

January 26, 1789
(term-limited)[g]
None[9] 1787 Thomas Gadsden
37 Charles Pinckney
(1757–1824)
[20][21]
January 26, 1789[22]

December 5, 1792
(term-limited)[i]
None[9] 1789 Alexander Gillon
1791
35 William Moultrie
(1730–1805)
[15][16]
December 5, 1792[15]

December 17, 1794
(term-limited)[i]
Federalist[24] 1792 James Ladson
38 Arnoldus Vanderhorst
(1748–1815)
[25][26]
December 17, 1794[25]

December 8, 1796
(term-limited)[i]
Federalist[24] 1794 Lewis Morris
37 Charles Pinckney
(1757–1824)
[20][21]
December 8, 1796[27]

December 19, 1798
(term-limited)[i]
Democratic-
Republican
[24]
1796 Robert Anderson
39 Edward Rutledge
(1749–1800)
[28][29]
December 19, 1798[30]

January 23, 1800
(died in office)
Federalist[24] 1798 John Drayton[j]
40 John Drayton
(1766–1822)
[31][32]
January 23, 1800[31]

December 8, 1802
(term-limited)[i]
Democratic-
Republican
[9]
Succeeded from
lieutenant
governor
Vacant
1800 Richard Winn
41 James Burchill Richardson
(1770–1836)
[33][34]
December 8, 1802[33]

December 7, 1804
(term-limited)[i]
Democratic-
Republican
[9]
1802 Ezekiel Pickens
42 Paul Hamilton
(1762–1816)
[35][36]
December 7, 1804[35]

December 9, 1806
(resigned)[k]
Democratic-
Republican
[9]
1804 Thomas Sumter Jr.
37 Charles Pinckney
(1757–1824)
[20][21]
December 9, 1806[20]

December 10, 1808
(term-limited)[i]
Democratic-
Republican
[9]
1806 John Hopkins
40 John Drayton
(1766–1822)
[31][32]
December 10, 1808[41]

December 10, 1810
(term-limited)[i]
Democratic-
Republican
[9]
1808 Frederick Nance
43 Henry Middleton
(1770–1846)
[42][43]
December 10, 1810[44]

December 10, 1812
(term-limited)[i]
Democratic-
Republican
[9]
1810 Samuel Farrow
44 Joseph Alston
(1779–1816)
[45][46]
December 10, 1812[45]

December 10, 1814
(term-limited)[i]
Democratic-
Republican
[9]
1812 Eldred Simkins
45 David Rogerson Williams
(1776–1830)
[47][48]
December 10, 1814[47]

December 5, 1816
(term-limited)[i]
Democratic-
Republican
[9]
1814 Robert Creswell
46 Andrew Pickens
(1779–1838)
[49][50]
December 5, 1816[49]

December 8, 1818
(term-limited)[i]
Democratic-
Republican
[9]
1816 John A. Cuthbert
47 John Geddes
(1777–1828)
[51][52]
December 8, 1818[53]

December 7, 1820
(term-limited)[i]
Democratic-
Republican
[9]
1818 William Youngblood
48 Thomas Bennett Jr.
(1781–1865)
[54][55]
December 7, 1820[56]

December 9, 1822
(term-limited)[i]
Democratic-
Republican
[9]
1820 William Pinckney
49 John Lyde Wilson
(1784–1849)
[57][58]
December 9, 1822[59]

December 3, 1824
(term-limited)[i]
Democratic-
Republican
[9]
1822 Henry Bradley
50 Richard Irvine Manning I
(1789–1836)
[60][61]
December 3, 1824[62]

December 11, 1826
(term-limited)[i]
Democratic-
Republican
[60]
1824 William A. Bull
51 John Taylor
(1770–1832)
[63][64]
December 11, 1826[65]

December 10, 1828
(term-limited)[i]
Democratic-
Republican
[63]
1826 James Witherspoon
52 Stephen Decatur Miller
(1787–1838)
[66][67]
December 10, 1828[68]

December 9, 1830
(term-limited)[i]
Nullifier[66] 1828 Thomas Williams
53 James Hamilton Jr.
(1786–1857)
[69][70]
December 9, 1830[71]

December 11, 1832
(term-limited)[i]
Nullifier[69] 1830 Patrick Noble
54 Robert Y. Hayne
(1791–1839)
[72][73]
December 11, 1832[74]

December 11, 1834
(term-limited)[i]
Nullifier[72] 1832 Charles Cotesworth Pinckney II
55 George McDuffie
(1790–1851)
[75][76]
December 11, 1834[77]

December 10, 1836
(term-limited)[i]
Democratic[9] 1834 Whitemarsh Benjamin Seabrook
56 Pierce Mason Butler
(1798–1847)
[78][79]
December 10, 1836[78]

December 10, 1838
(term-limited)[i]
Democratic[9] 1836 William DuBose
57 Patrick Noble
(1787–1840)
[80][81]
December 10, 1838[82]

April 7, 1840
(died in office)
Democratic[9] 1838 Barnabas Kelet Henagan
58 Barnabas Kelet Henagan
(1798–1855)
[83][84]
April 7, 1840[85]

December 10, 1840
(did not run)
Democratic[9] Succeeded from
lieutenant
governor
Vacant
59 John Peter Richardson II
(1801–1864)
[86][87]
December 10, 1840[88]

December 10, 1842
(term-limited)[i]
Democratic[9] 1840 William K. Clowney
60 James H. Hammond
(1807–1864)
[89][90]
December 10, 1842[91]

December 10, 1844
(term-limited)[i]
Democratic[9] 1842 Isaac D. Witherspoon
61 William Aiken Jr.
(1806–1887)
[92][93]
December 10, 1844[94]

December 10, 1846
(term-limited)[i]
Democratic[9] 1844 J. F. Ervin
62 David Johnson
(1782–1855)
[95][96]
December 10, 1846[97]

December 14, 1848
(term-limited)[i]
Democratic[9] 1846 William Cain
63 Whitemarsh Benjamin Seabrook
(1793–1855)
[98][99]
December 14, 1848[100]

December 16, 1850
(term-limited)[i]
Democratic[9] 1848 William Henry Gist
64 John Hugh Means
(1812–1862)
[101][102]
December 16, 1850[103]

December 13, 1852
(term-limited)[i]
Democratic[9] 1850 Joshua John Ward
65 John Lawrence Manning
(1816–1889)
[104][105]
December 13, 1852[106]

December 13, 1854
(term-limited)[i]
Democratic[9] 1852 James Irby
66 James Hopkins Adams
(1812–1861)
[107][108]
December 13, 1854[109]

December 11, 1856
(term-limited)[i]
Democratic[9] 1854 Richard de Treville
67 Robert Francis Withers Allston
(1801–1864)
[110][111]
December 11, 1856[112]

December 13, 1858
(term-limited)[i]
Democratic[9] 1856 Gabriel Cannon
68 William Henry Gist
(1807–1874)
[113][114]
December 13, 1858[115]

December 17, 1860
(term-limited)[i]
Democratic[9] 1858 M. E. Carn
69 Francis Wilkinson Pickens
(d. 1869)
[116][117]
December 17, 1860[118]

December 18, 1862
(term-limited)[l]
Democratic[9] 1860 W. W. Harllee
70 Milledge Luke Bonham
(1813–1890)
[120][121]
December 18, 1862[122]

December 19, 1864
(term-limited)[l]
Democratic[9] 1862 Plowden Weston
(died)
Vacant
71 Andrew Gordon Magrath
(1813–1893)
[123][124]
December 19, 1864[125]

May 28, 1865
(arrested and removed)[m]
Democratic[9] 1864 Robert McCaw
Vacant May 28, 1865

June 30, 1865
Office vacated
after civil war
Vacant
72 Benjamin Franklin Perry
(1805–1886)
[126][127]
June 30, 1865[128]

November 29, 1865
(did not run)[126]
Provisional governor
appointed by President
73 James Lawrence Orr
(1822–1873)
[129][130]
November 29, 1865[131]

July 9, 1868
(did not run)
Democratic[132] 1865 William Dennison Porter
74 Robert Kingston Scott
(1826–1900)
[133][134]
July 9, 1868[135]

December 3, 1872
(did not run)
Republican[9] 1868 Lemuel Boozer
1870 Alonzo J. Ransier
75 Franklin J. Moses Jr.
(1838–1906)
[136][137]
December 3, 1872[138]

December 1, 1874
(lost nomination)
Republican[9] 1872 Richard Howell Gleaves
76 Daniel Henry Chamberlain
(1835–1907)
[139][140]
December 1, 1874[141]

April 11, 1877
(lost election)
Republican[9] 1874
1876[n]
77 Wade Hampton III
(1818–1902)
[142][143]
December 14, 1876[144]

February 26, 1879
(resigned)[o]
Democratic[9] William Dunlap Simpson
1878
78 William Dunlap Simpson
(1823–1890)
[146][147]
February 26, 1879[145]

September 1, 1880
(resigned)[p]
Democratic[9] Succeeded from
lieutenant
governor
Vacant
79 Thomas Bothwell Jeter
(1827–1883)
[148][149]
September 1, 1880[150]

November 30, 1880
(successor took office)
Democratic[9] Succeeded from
president
pro tempore
of the Senate
80 Johnson Hagood
(1829–1898)
[151][152]
November 30, 1880[153]

December 5, 1882
(did not run)[151]
Democratic[9] 1880 John Doby Kennedy
81 Hugh Smith Thompson
(1836–1904)
[154][155]
December 5, 1882[156]

July 10, 1886
(resigned)[q]
Democratic[9] 1882 John Calhoun Sheppard
1884
82 John Calhoun Sheppard
(1850–1931)
[157][158]
July 10, 1886[159]

November 30, 1886
(lost nomination)[157]
Democratic[9] Succeeded from
lieutenant
governor
Vacant
83 John Peter Richardson III
(1831–1899)
[160][161]
November 30, 1886[162]

December 4, 1890
(did not run)
Democratic[9] 1886 William Mauldin
1888
84 Benjamin Tillman
(1847–1918)
[163][164]
December 4, 1890[165]

December 4, 1894
(did not run)[r]
Democratic[9] 1890 Eugene Gary
1892 Washington Hodges Timmerman
85 John Gary Evans
(1863–1942)
[166][167]
December 4, 1894[168]

January 18, 1897
(did not run)
Democratic[9] 1894
86 William Haselden Ellerbe
(1862–1899)
[169][170]
January 18, 1897[171]

June 2, 1899
(died in office)
Democratic[9] 1896 Miles Benjamin McSweeney
1898
87 Miles Benjamin McSweeney
(1855–1909)
[172][173]
June 2, 1899[174]

January 21, 1903
(did not run)
Democratic[9] Succeeded from
lieutenant
governor
Robert B. Scarborough
1900
88 Duncan Clinch Heyward
(1864–1943)
[175][176]
January 21, 1903[177]

January 15, 1907
(did not run)
Democratic[9] 1902 James H. Tillman
1904 John Sloan
89 Martin Frederick Ansel
(1850–1945)
[178][179]
January 15, 1907[180]

January 17, 1911
(did not run)
Democratic[9] 1906 Thomas Gordon McLeod
1908
90 Cole L. Blease
(1868–1942)
[181][182]
January 17, 1911[183]

January 14, 1915
(resigned)[s]
Democratic[9] 1910 Charles Aurelius Smith
1912
91 Charles Aurelius Smith
(1861–1916)
[185][186]
January 14, 1915[184]

January 19, 1915
(successor took office)
Democratic[9] Succeeded from
lieutenant
governor
Vacant
92 Richard Irvine Manning III
(1859–1931)
[187][188]
January 19, 1915[189]

January 21, 1919
(did not run)
Democratic[9] 1914 Andrew Bethea
1916
93 Robert Archer Cooper
(1874–1953)
[190][191]
January 21, 1919[192]

May 20, 1922
(resigned)[t]
Democratic[9] 1918 J. T. Lyles
1920 Wilson Godfrey Harvey
94 Wilson Godfrey Harvey
(1866–1932)
[193][194]
May 20, 1922[195]

January 16, 1923
(did not run)
Democratic[9] Succeeded from
lieutenant
governor
Vacant
95 Thomas Gordon McLeod
(1868–1932)
[196][197]
January 16, 1923[198]

January 18, 1927
(did not run)
Democratic[9] 1922 E. B. Jackson
1924
96 John Gardiner Richards Jr.
(1864–1941)
[199][200]
January 18, 1927[201]

January 20, 1931
(term-limited)[u]
Democratic[9] 1926 Thomas Bothwell Butler
(died)
Vacant
97 Ibra Charles Blackwood
(1878–1936)
[203][204]
January 20, 1931[205]

January 15, 1935
(term-limited)[u]
Democratic[9] 1930 James Sheppard
98 Olin D. Johnston
(1896–1965)
[206][207]
January 15, 1935[208]

January 17, 1939
(term-limited)[u]
Democratic[9] 1934 Joseph Emile Harley
99 Burnet R. Maybank
(1899–1954)
[209][210]
January 17, 1939[211]

November 4, 1941
(resigned)[v]
Democratic[9] 1938
100 Joseph Emile Harley
(1880–1942)
[212][213]
November 4, 1941[214]

February 27, 1942
(died in office)
Democratic[9] Succeeded from
lieutenant
governor
Vacant
Vacant February 27, 1942

March 2, 1942
Office vacant
after death
[w]
101 Richard Manning Jefferies
(1889–1964)
[215][216]
March 2, 1942[w]

January 19, 1943
(did not run)
Democratic[9] Succeeded from
president
pro tempore
of the Senate
98 Olin D. Johnston
(1896–1965)
[206][207]
January 19, 1943[219]

January 2, 1945
(resigned)[x]
Democratic[9] 1942 Ransome Judson Williams
102 Ransome Judson Williams
(1892–1970)
[220][221]
January 2, 1945[222]

January 21, 1947
(lost nomination)
Democratic[9] Succeeded from
lieutenant
governor
Vacant
103 Strom Thurmond
(1902–2003)
[223][224]
January 21, 1947[225]

January 16, 1951
(term-limited)[u]
Democratic[9] 1946 George Bell Timmerman Jr.
104 James F. Byrnes
(1882–1972)
[226][227]
January 16, 1951[228]

January 18, 1955
(term-limited)[u]
Democratic[9] 1950
105 George Bell Timmerman Jr.
(1912–1994)
[229][230]
January 18, 1955[231]

January 20, 1959
(term-limited)[u]
Democratic[9] 1954 Fritz Hollings
106 Fritz Hollings
(1922–2019)
[232][233]
January 20, 1959[234]

January 15, 1963
(term-limited)[u]
Democratic[9] 1958 Burnet R. Maybank Jr.
107 Donald S. Russell
(1906–1998)
[235][236]
January 15, 1963[237]

April 22, 1965
(resigned)[y]
Democratic[9] 1962 Robert Evander McNair
108 Robert Evander McNair
(1923–2007)
[238][239]
April 22, 1965[240]

January 19, 1971
(term-limited)[u]
Democratic[9] Succeeded from
lieutenant
governor
Vacant
1966 John C. West
109 John C. West
(1922–2004)
[241][242]
January 19, 1971[243]

January 15, 1975
(term-limited)[z]
Democratic[9] 1970 Earle Morris Jr.
110 James B. Edwards
(1927–2014)
[245][246]
January 15, 1975[247]

January 10, 1979
(term-limited)[z]
Republican[9] 1974 W. Brantley Harvey Jr.[aa]
111 Richard Riley
(b. 1933)
[248]
January 10, 1979[249]

January 14, 1987
(term-limited)[z]
Democratic[248] 1978 Nancy Stevenson
1982 Michael R. Daniel
112 Carroll A. Campbell Jr.
(1940–2005)
[250]
January 14, 1987[251]

January 11, 1995
(term-limited)[z]
Republican[250] 1986 Nick Theodore[aa]
1990
113 David Beasley
(b. 1957)
[252]
January 11, 1995[253]

January 13, 1999
(lost election)
Republican[252] 1994 Bob Peeler[ab]
114 Jim Hodges
(b. 1956)
[254]
January 13, 1999[255]

January 15, 2003
(lost election)
Democratic[254] 1998
115 Mark Sanford
(b. 1960)
[256]
January 15, 2003[257]

January 12, 2011
(term-limited)[z]
Republican[256] 2002 André Bauer
2006
116 Nikki Haley
(b. 1972)
[258]
January 12, 2011[259]

January 24, 2017
(resigned)[ac]
Republican[258] 2010 Ken Ard
Glenn F. McConnell
Yancey McGill[aa]
2014 Henry McMaster
117 Henry McMaster
(b. 1947)
[261]
January 24, 2017[260]

Incumbent[ad]
Republican[261] Succeeded from
lieutenant
governor
Kevin L. Bryant
2018 Pamela Evette
2022

Notes

  1. ^ Office was known as President until 1779.
  2. ^ Office was known as Vice President until 1779.
  3. ^ Lieutenant governors represented the same party as their governor unless noted.
  4. ^ Rutledge vetoed the new constitution, and after his veto was overturned, he resigned.[8]
  5. ^ Arthur Middleton was elected to succeed Rutledge, but he declined the office, as he shared Rutledge's objections to the new constitution. Lowndes was then elected.[8]
  6. ^ There was no 1780 election, due to issues arising from the American Revolutionary War, so Rutledge continued to serve after his term would normally have ended, and Mathews' term was accordingly shortened.[9]
  7. ^ a b c d Under the 1778 constitution, governors were ineligible for the office for four years after the end of their term.[11]
  8. ^ Christopher Gadsden was elected in 1782, but declined, so the legislature then chose Mathews.[9]
  9. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af Under the 1790 constitution, governors were ineligible for the office for four years after the end of their term.[23]
  10. ^ Represented the Democratic-Republican Party
  11. ^ Hamilton resigned near the end of his natural term,[37] due to complaints about him running for a seat in the South Carolina legislature while still sitting as governor.[38][39] Hamilton's resignation was submitted on December 1, but it does not appear to have taken effect until his successor was elected.[40]
  12. ^ a b Under the 1861 constitution, governors were ineligible for the office for four years after the end of their term.[119]
  13. ^ Magrath was arrested by Union forces soon after the American Civil War ended; he was released seven months later.[123]
  14. ^ The 1876 election was very close, and two governments emerged, one run by Chamberlain, the other by Hampton. The dispute ended in April 1877 with Hampton and the Democratic Party taking control of the state.[139]
  15. ^ Hampton resigned, having been elected to the United States Senate; some modern sources say he resigned after being wounded in a hunting accident,[142] but the letter of resignation makes no mention of this.[145]
  16. ^ Simpson resigned, having been elected Chief Justice of the South Carolina Supreme Court.[146]
  17. ^ Thompson resigned, having been confirmed as United States Assistant Secretary of the Treasury.[154]
  18. ^ Tillman was instead elected to the United States Senate.[163]
  19. ^ Blease resigned, citing no reason.[184]
  20. ^ Cooper resigned, having been appointed to the Federal Farm Loan Board.[190]
  21. ^ a b c d e f g h Under the 1926 constitution, governors were ineligible to succeed themselves.[202]
  22. ^ Maybank resigned, having been elected to the United States Senate.[209]
  23. ^ a b Harley died on February 27; even though the constitution says that the president pro tempore of the Senate would succeed to the office of governor should both it and lieutenant governor become vacant, Jefferies delayed accepting for several days,[217] unsure if he wanted to leave his Senate duties.[218]
  24. ^ Johnston resigned, having been elected to the United States Senate.[206]
  25. ^ Russell resigned so that his successor would appoint him to the United States Senate.[235]
  26. ^ a b c d e Under a 1981 amendment to the constitution, governors are ineligible to be elected for more than two successive terms.[244]
  27. ^ a b c Represented the Democratic Party
  28. ^ Represented the Republican Party
  29. ^ Haley resigned, having been confirmed as United States Ambassador to the United Nations.[260]
  30. ^ McMaster's second full term began January 11, 2023, and will expire January 13, 2027; he will be term-limited.

References

General
Specific
  1. ^ "Ratification of the Constitution by the State of South Carolina; May 23, 1788". The Avalon Project at Yale Law School. Archived from the original on November 8, 2015. Retrieved October 31, 2015.
  2. ^ "Secession Ordinances of 13 Confederate States". University of Houston. Archived from the original on September 5, 2015. Retrieved May 24, 2015.
  3. ^ Constitution for the Provisional Government of the Confederate States of America Archived August 20, 2016, at the Wayback Machine, accessed July 8, 2015
  4. ^ Act authorizing readmission on ratification of 14th amendment: 15 Stat. 73. Proclamation of South Carolina's ratification: 15 Stat. 704.
  5. ^ Kallenbach 1977, pp. 527–533.
  6. ^ a b "John Rutledge". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 18, 2023.
  7. ^ a b c d Salley, Jr., A.S. "Governors of South Carolina 1670–2022" (PDF). South Carolina Legislature. Retrieved July 1, 2023.
  8. ^ a b Flanders, Henry. The Lives and Times of the Chief Justices of the United States Supreme Court, pp. 551–552. Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott & Co., 1874 at Google Books.
  9. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb bc bd be bf bg bh bi bj bk bl bm bn bo bp bq br bs bt bu bv bw bx by Kallenbach 1977, pp. 533–536.
  10. ^ "Rawlins Lowndes". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 18, 2023.
  11. ^ "1778 S.C. Const. art. VI". www.stateconstitutions.umd.edu. Retrieved December 20, 2023.
  12. ^ "John Mathews". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 19, 2023.
  13. ^ "Benjamin Guerard". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 19, 2023.
  14. ^ "South Carolina". Dunlap and Claypoole's American Daily Advertiser. April 3, 1783. p. 2. Retrieved July 2, 2023.
  15. ^ a b c Sobel 1978, p. 1388.
  16. ^ a b "William Moultrie". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 19, 2023.
  17. ^ "Charleston, (S.C.)". Dunlap and Claypoole's American Daily Advertiser. March 10, 1785. p. 2. Retrieved July 2, 2023.
  18. ^ "Thomas Pinckney". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 19, 2023.
  19. ^ "American Intelligence". The Independent Gazetteer. March 9, 1787. p. 2. Retrieved July 2, 2023.
  20. ^ a b c d Sobel 1978, pp. 1387–1388.
  21. ^ a b c "Charles Pinckney". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 19, 2023.
  22. ^ "America". Dunlap and Claypoole's American Daily Advertiser. February 23, 1789. p. 2. Retrieved July 2, 2023.
  23. ^ "1790 S.C. Const. art. II, § 2". www.stateconstitutions.umd.edu. Retrieved December 20, 2023.
  24. ^ a b c d Glashan 1979, p. 278.
  25. ^ a b Sobel 1978, p. 1389.
  26. ^ "Arnoldus Vandershorst". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 20, 2023.
  27. ^ "By This Day's Mails". The Philadelphia Inquirer. December 29, 1796. p. 2. Retrieved July 2, 2023.
  28. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1389–1390.
  29. ^ "Edward Rutledge". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 21, 2023.
  30. ^ "Governor Rutledge's Speech". The North American. January 15, 1799. p. 3. Retrieved July 2, 2023.
  31. ^ a b c Sobel 1978, pp. 1390–1391.
  32. ^ a b "John Drayton". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 21, 2023.
  33. ^ a b Sobel 1978, p. 1391.
  34. ^ "James Burchill Richardson". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 28, 2023.
  35. ^ a b Sobel 1978, pp. 1391–1392.
  36. ^ "Paul Hamilton". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 28, 2023.
  37. ^ "none". Virginia Argus. December 26, 1806. p. 3. Retrieved June 28, 2023. The Legislature of South Carolina, on the 9th instant, elected Charles Pinckney, Governor of that State, in the place of Paul Hamilton, resigned.
  38. ^ "Governor of the State of South Carolina - Paul Hamilton". www.carolana.com. Retrieved June 28, 2023.
  39. ^ "Election Returns". The Charleston Daily Courier. October 22, 1806. p. 3. Retrieved June 28, 2023.
  40. ^ "Legislature of South-Carolina". The Charleston Daily Courier. December 8, 1806. p. 2. Retrieved June 28, 2023.
  41. ^ "Legislature of South-Carolina". The Charleston Daily Courier. December 17, 1808. p. 2. Retrieved July 3, 2023.
  42. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1392–1393.
  43. ^ "Henry Middleton". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 29, 2023.
  44. ^ "Legislature of South-Carolina". The Charleston Daily Courier. December 20, 1810. p. 2. Retrieved July 3, 2023.
  45. ^ a b Sobel 1978, p. 1393.
  46. ^ "Joseph Alston". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 29, 2023.
  47. ^ a b Sobel 1978, p. 1394.
  48. ^ "David Rogerson Williams". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 29, 2023.
  49. ^ a b Sobel 1978, pp. 1394–1395.
  50. ^ "Andrew Pickens". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 29, 2023.
  51. ^ Sobel 1978, p. 1395.
  52. ^ "Geddes John". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 29, 2023.
  53. ^ "none". The Charleston Daily Courier. December 12, 1818. p. 2. Retrieved July 3, 2023. The Hon. John Geddes was, on Tuesday last, elected Governor of this State.
  54. ^ Sobel 1978, p. 1396.
  55. ^ "Thomas Bennett". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 29, 2023.
  56. ^ "none". The Evening Post. December 20, 1820. p. 2. Retrieved July 3, 2023. The hon. Thomas Bennett was elected on the 7th inst. governor of the state of South CArolina...
  57. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1396–1397.
  58. ^ "John Lyde Wilson". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 29, 2023.
  59. ^ "South-Carolina Legislature". The Charleston Mercury. December 19, 1822. p. 1. Retrieved July 3, 2023.
  60. ^ a b Sobel 1978, pp. 1397–1398.
  61. ^ "Richard Irvine Manning". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 29, 2023.
  62. ^ "From Columbia". The Charleston Daily Courier. December 7, 1824. p. 2. Retrieved July 3, 2023.
  63. ^ a b Sobel 1978, p. 1398.
  64. ^ "John Taylor". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 29, 2023.
  65. ^ "Columbia". The Charleston Daily Courier. December 15, 1826. p. 2. Retrieved July 3, 2023.
  66. ^ a b Sobel 1978, pp. 1398–1399.
  67. ^ "Stephen Decatur Miller". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 29, 2023.
  68. ^ "none". The Charleston Mercury. December 15, 1828. p. 2. Retrieved July 3, 2023. At 12 o'clock, the inauguration of the Governor and Lieutenant-Governor elect, took place with the customary ceremonies.
  69. ^ a b Sobel 1978, pp. 1399–1400.
  70. ^ "James Jr. Hamilton". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 29, 2023.
  71. ^ "From Columbia". The Charleston Mercury. December 14, 1830. p. 2. Retrieved July 3, 2023.
  72. ^ a b Sobel 1978, pp. 1400–1401.
  73. ^ "Robert Young Hayne". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 29, 2023.
  74. ^ "South-Carolina Legislature". The Charleston Daily Courier. December 14, 1832. p. 2. Retrieved July 3, 2023.
  75. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1401–1402.
  76. ^ "George McDuffie". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 29, 2023.
  77. ^ "State Legislature". The Charleston Mercury. December 15, 1834. p. 2. Retrieved July 3, 2023.
  78. ^ a b Sobel 1978, p. 1402.
  79. ^ "Pierce Mason Butler". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 29, 2023.
  80. ^ Sobel 1978, p. 1403.
  81. ^ "Patrick Noble". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 29, 2023.
  82. ^ "South Carolina Legislature". Edgefield Advertiser. December 27, 1838. p. 2. Retrieved July 3, 2023.
  83. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1403–1404.
  84. ^ "Barnabas Kelet Henagan". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 30, 2023.
  85. ^ "Death of Gov. Noble". The Charleston Daily Courier. April 13, 1840. p. 2. Retrieved July 3, 2023.
  86. ^ Sobel 1978, p. 1404.
  87. ^ "John Peter Richardson II". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 30, 2023.
  88. ^ "The Inauguration". Edgefield Advertiser. December 17, 1840. p. 2. Retrieved July 3, 2023.
  89. ^ Sobel 1978, p. 1405.
  90. ^ "James Henry Hammond". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 30, 2023.
  91. ^ "South Carolina Legislature". The Charleston Daily Courier. December 12, 1842. p. 2. Retrieved July 3, 2023.
  92. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1405–1406.
  93. ^ "William Aiken". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 30, 2023.
  94. ^ "South Carolina Legislature". The Charleston Daily Courier. December 12, 1844. p. 2. Retrieved July 3, 2023.
  95. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1406–1407.
  96. ^ "David Johnson". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 30, 2023.
  97. ^ "Governor Johnson's Inauguration". Edgefield Advertiser. December 16, 1846. p. 2. Retrieved July 3, 2023.
  98. ^ Sobel 1978, p. 1407.
  99. ^ "Whitemarsh Benjamin Seabrook". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 30, 2023.
  100. ^ "From Columbia". The Charleston Daily Courier. December 15, 1848. p. 2. Retrieved July 3, 2023.
  101. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1407–1408.
  102. ^ "John Hugh Means". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 30, 2023.
  103. ^ "Proceedings of the So. Ca. Legislature". The Charleston Daily Courier. December 18, 1850. p. 2. Retrieved July 3, 2023.
  104. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1408–1409.
  105. ^ "John Laurence Manning". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 30, 2023.
  106. ^ "Legislative Proceedings - The Inauguration". The Charleston Daily Courier. December 16, 1852. p. 1. Retrieved July 3, 2023.
  107. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1409–1410.
  108. ^ "James Hopkins Adams". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 30, 2023.
  109. ^ "Legislative Proceedings". Edgefield Advertiser. December 20, 1854. p. 2. Retrieved July 3, 2023.
  110. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1410–1411.
  111. ^ "Robert Francis Withers Allston". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 30, 2023.
  112. ^ "South Carolina Legislature". Yorkville Enquirer. December 18, 1856. p. 2. Retrieved July 3, 2023.
  113. ^ Sobel 1978, p. 1411.
  114. ^ "William Henry Gist". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 30, 2023.
  115. ^ "The Inauguration". The Charleston Daily Courier. December 15, 1858. p. 1. Retrieved July 3, 2023.
  116. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1411–1412.
  117. ^ "Francis Wilkinson Pickens". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 30, 2023.
  118. ^ "South Carolina Legislature". The Charleston Daily Courier. December 18, 1860. p. 1. Retrieved July 3, 2023.
  119. ^ "1861 S.C. Const. art. II, § 2". www.stateconstitutions.umd.edu. Retrieved December 20, 2023.
  120. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1412–1413.
  121. ^ "Milledge Luke Bonham". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 30, 2023.
  122. ^ "Inauguration of Governor Bonham". The Charleston Mercury. December 20, 1862. p. 1. Retrieved July 3, 2023.
  123. ^ a b Sobel 1978, pp. 1413–1414.
  124. ^ "Andrew Gordon MacGrath". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 30, 2023.
  125. ^ "The Inauguration of Governor Magrath". The Charleston Mercury. December 22, 1864. p. 1. Retrieved July 3, 2023.
  126. ^ a b Sobel 1978, pp. 1414–1415.
  127. ^ "Benjamin Franklin Perry". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 30, 2023.
  128. ^ Presidential Proclamation No. 46, 30 June 1865, 13 Stat. 769, 770
  129. ^ Sobel 1978, p. 1415.
  130. ^ "James Lawrence Orr". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 30, 2023.
  131. ^ "Journal of the Senate of the State of South Carolina". The Daily Phoenix. November 30, 1865. p. 2. Retrieved July 3, 2023.
  132. ^ Glashan 1979, p. 284.
  133. ^ Sobel 1978, p. 1416.
  134. ^ "Robert Kingston Scott". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 30, 2023.
  135. ^ "Inauguration of Gov. Scott". The Daily Phoenix. July 10, 1868. p. 2. Retrieved July 3, 2023.
  136. ^ Sobel 1978, p. 1417.
  137. ^ "Franklin J. Moses". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 30, 2023.
  138. ^ "The Governor Elect". The Charleston Daily Courier. December 4, 1872. p. 1. Retrieved July 3, 2023.
  139. ^ a b Sobel 1978, p. 1418.
  140. ^ "Daniel Henry Chamberlain". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 30, 2023.
  141. ^ "Inaugural Address of the Governor". The Daily Phoenix. December 2, 1874. p. 3. Retrieved July 3, 2023.
  142. ^ a b Sobel 1978, pp. 1418–1419.
  143. ^ "Wade Hampton III". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 30, 2023.
  144. ^ "Editorial Correspondence". The Pickens Sentinel. December 21, 1876. p. 2. Retrieved July 3, 2023.
  145. ^ a b "Gov. Hampton's Farewell". The News and Herald. March 4, 1879. p. 1. Retrieved July 3, 2023.
  146. ^ a b Sobel 1978, pp. 1419–1420.
  147. ^ "William Dunlap Simpson". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 30, 2023.
  148. ^ Sobel 1978, p. 1420.
  149. ^ "Thomas Bothwell Jeter". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 30, 2023.
  150. ^ "Gov. Simpson's Farewell". The Newberry Weekly Herald. September 8, 1880. p. 2. Retrieved July 4, 2023.
  151. ^ a b Sobel 1978, p. 1421.
  152. ^ "Johnson Hagood". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 30, 2023.
  153. ^ "Inauguration Day". The News and Herald. December 2, 1880. p. 2. Retrieved July 4, 2023.
  154. ^ a b Sobel 1978, pp. 1421–1422.
  155. ^ "Hugh Smith Thompson". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 30, 2023.
  156. ^ "The Inauguration". Union Times. December 15, 1882. p. 1. Retrieved July 4, 2023.
  157. ^ a b Sobel 1978, p. 1422.
  158. ^ "John Calhoun Sheppard". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 30, 2023.
  159. ^ "The Two Governors". The Watchman and Southron. July 13, 1886. p. 2. Retrieved July 4, 2023.
  160. ^ Sobel 1978, p. 1423.
  161. ^ "John Peter Richardson". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 30, 2023.
  162. ^ "His Inaugural Address". Yorkville Enquirer. December 8, 1886. p. 1. Retrieved July 4, 2023.
  163. ^ a b Sobel 1978, pp. 1423–1424.
  164. ^ "Benjamin Ryan Tillman". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 30, 2023.
  165. ^ "A Political Drama". The Newberry Herald and News. December 11, 1890. p. 1. Retrieved July 4, 2023.
  166. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1424–1425.
  167. ^ "John Gary Evans". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 30, 2023.
  168. ^ "Evans Is Governor". The Gaffney Ledger. December 7, 1894. p. 1. Retrieved July 4, 2023.
  169. ^ Sobel 1978, p. 1425.
  170. ^ "William Haselden Ellerbe". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 30, 2023.
  171. ^ "Governor Ellerbe". The Times and Democrat. January 20, 1897. p. 1. Retrieved July 4, 2023.
  172. ^ Sobel 1978, p. 1426.
  173. ^ "Miles Benjamin McSweeney". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 30, 2023.
  174. ^ "Gov. Ellerbe Dead". The Intelligencer. June 7, 1899. p. 1. Retrieved July 4, 2023.
  175. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1426–1427.
  176. ^ "Duncan Clinch Heyward". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 30, 2023.
  177. ^ "Our New Governor". The Intelligencer. January 28, 1903. p. 4. Retrieved July 4, 2023.
  178. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1427–1428.
  179. ^ "Martin Frederick Ansel". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 30, 2023.
  180. ^ "Martin F. Ansel Is Now Chief Executive". The County Record. January 17, 1907. p. 8. Retrieved July 4, 2023.
  181. ^ Sobel 1978, p. 1428.
  182. ^ "Coleman Livingston Blease". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 30, 2023.
  183. ^ "Takes Reins". The Times and Democrat. January 19, 1911. p. 1. Retrieved July 4, 2023.
  184. ^ a b "Gov. Blease Resigns and Lieut. Gov. Chas. Smith Succeeds Him". The Columbia Record. January 14, 1915. p. 1. Retrieved July 4, 2023.
  185. ^ Sobel 1978, p. 1429.
  186. ^ "Charles A. Smith". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 30, 2023.
  187. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1429–1430.
  188. ^ "Richard Irvine Manning III". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 30, 2023.
  189. ^ "Manning Took Oath As the Governor of South Carolina at Noon Today". The Herald. January 19, 1915. p. 1. Retrieved July 4, 2023.
  190. ^ a b Sobel 1978, pp. 1430–1431.
  191. ^ "Robert Archer Cooper". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 30, 2023.
  192. ^ "Robert A. Cooper Became Governor at 1:05 Yesterday". The Greenville News. January 22, 1919. p. 1. Retrieved July 4, 2023.
  193. ^ Sobel 1978, p. 1431.
  194. ^ "Wilson Godfrey Harvey". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 30, 2023.
  195. ^ "New Governor Is Inaugurated at Noon Today". The Columbia Record. May 20, 1922. p. 1. Retrieved July 4, 2023.
  196. ^ Sobel 1978, p. 1432.
  197. ^ "Thomas Gordon McLeod". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 30, 2023.
  198. ^ "McLeod Takes Oath As Chief Executive". The State. January 17, 1923. p. 1. Retrieved July 4, 2023.
  199. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1432–1433.
  200. ^ "John Gardiner Richards". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 30, 2023.
  201. ^ "John G. Richards Takes Office As Governor of S.C." The Press and Standard. January 19, 1927. p. 1. Retrieved July 4, 2023.
  202. ^ Kallenbach 1977, p. 528.
  203. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1433–1434.
  204. ^ "Ibra Charles Blackwood". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 30, 2023.
  205. ^ "Inauguration of Governor Marked Yesterday at Capitol". The Press and Standard. January 21, 1931. p. 1. Retrieved July 4, 2023.
  206. ^ a b c Sobel 1978, p. 1434.
  207. ^ a b "Olin De Witt Talmadge Johnston". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 30, 2023.
  208. ^ "Olin D. Johnston Is Inaugurated As New Governor". The Item. Associated Press. January 15, 1935. p. 1. Retrieved July 4, 2023.
  209. ^ a b Sobel 1978, p. 1435.
  210. ^ "Burnet Rhett Maybank". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 30, 2023.
  211. ^ "Governor Maybank for Progressive Regime". The Greenville News. January 18, 1939. p. 1. Retrieved July 4, 2023.
  212. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1435–1436.
  213. ^ "Joseph Emile Harley". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 30, 2023.
  214. ^ "Barnwell Attorney Is Sworn In Succeeding Senator-Elect". The Herald. Associated Press. November 4, 1941. p. 1. Retrieved July 4, 2023.
  215. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1436–1437.
  216. ^ "Richard Manning Jeffries". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 30, 2023.
  217. ^ "Jefferies Takes Oath As Governor of SC". The State. March 3, 1942. p. 1. Retrieved July 4, 2023.
  218. ^ "S.C. Is Without Leader For Third Day As Jefferies Ponders Move". The Index-Journal. Associated Press. March 2, 1942. p. 1. Retrieved July 4, 2023.
  219. ^ "Johnston Envisions Dry South Carolina in Inaugural Talk". The Greenville News. Associated Press. January 20, 1943. p. 1. Retrieved July 4, 2023.
  220. ^ Sobel 1978, p. 1437.
  221. ^ "Ransome Judson Williams". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 30, 2023.
  222. ^ Wood, Reginald L. (January 3, 1945). "Williams Takes Oath As Governor of This State". The Greenville News. Associated Press. p. 2. Retrieved July 4, 2023.
  223. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1437–1438.
  224. ^ "James Strom Thurmond". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 30, 2023.
  225. ^ Freeman, Wayne (January 22, 1947). "Thurmond Inaugural Is Brilliant". The Greenville News. p. 1. Retrieved July 4, 2023.
  226. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1438–1439.
  227. ^ "James Francis Byrnes". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 30, 2023.
  228. ^ Lavisky, Saul (January 17, 1951). "Crowd and Good Weather Brightened 'Byrnes Day'". The Herald. p. 4. Retrieved July 4, 2023.
  229. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1439–1440.
  230. ^ "George Bell Timmerman". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 30, 2023.
  231. ^ Duncan, Alderman (January 19, 1955). "New Governor Out to Retain 'Way of Life'". The Greenville News. Associated Press. p. 1. Retrieved July 4, 2023.
  232. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1440–1441.
  233. ^ "Ernest Frederick Hollings". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 30, 2023.
  234. ^ "Hollings Is Inaugurated As State's Eightieth Governor". The Times and Democrat. Associated Press. January 21, 1959. p. 1. Retrieved July 4, 2023.
  235. ^ a b Sobel 1978, p. 1441.
  236. ^ "Donald Stuart Russell". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 30, 2023.
  237. ^ Wickenberg, Charles H. (January 16, 1963). "Russell Takes Office; Urges Better Schools". The State. p. 1. Retrieved July 4, 2023.
  238. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1441–1442.
  239. ^ "Robert Evander McNair". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 30, 2023.
  240. ^ "Gov. McNair Inaugurated; Appoints Russell to Senate". The Greenville News. Associated Press. April 23, 1965. p. 1. Retrieved July 4, 2023.
  241. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1442–1443.
  242. ^ "John Carl West". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 30, 2023.
  243. ^ Milkie, Joyce W. (January 20, 1971). "Pomp, Ceremony and Just Plain Cold". The Times and Democrat. p. 1. Retrieved July 4, 2023.
  244. ^ "S.C. Const. art. II, § 2". www.stateconstitutions.umd.edu. Retrieved December 20, 2023.
  245. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1443–1444.
  246. ^ "James Burrows Edwards". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 30, 2023.
  247. ^ "Sworn In As S.C.'s 86th Chief Executive". The Columbia Record. January 15, 1975. p. 1. Retrieved July 4, 2023.
  248. ^ a b "Richard Wilson Riley". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 30, 2023.
  249. ^ Surratt, W. Clark (January 11, 1979). "Gov. Riley Outlines Plans on S.C. Future". The State. p. 1A. Retrieved July 4, 2023.
  250. ^ a b "Carroll A. Campbell". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 30, 2023.
  251. ^ Adams, Jerry (January 15, 1987). "Campbell: S.C. Should Be 'State of Opportunity'". The State. p. 1A. Retrieved July 4, 2023.
  252. ^ a b "David M. Beasley". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 30, 2023.
  253. ^ Bandy, Lee (January 12, 1995). "GOP's Beasley Takes Oath As 113th Governor". The State. p. 1. Retrieved July 4, 2023.
  254. ^ a b "Jim Hodges". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 30, 2023.
  255. ^ "Hodges Takes Oath". The State. January 14, 1999. p. 1. Retrieved July 4, 2023.
  256. ^ a b "Mark Sanford". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 30, 2023.
  257. ^ Sheinin, Aaron; Harris, Kenneth A. (January 16, 2003). "'Forward... With Each Other'". The State. p. 1. Retrieved July 4, 2023.
  258. ^ a b "Nikki R. Haley". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 30, 2023.
  259. ^ Davenport, Jim (January 13, 2011). "Haley Sworn In". The Island Packet. Associated Press. p. 1. Retrieved July 4, 2023.
  260. ^ a b Self, Jamie (January 25, 2017). "Haley Gets UN Post; McMaster Is Governor". The State. p. A1. Retrieved July 4, 2023.
  261. ^ a b "Henry McMaster". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 30, 2023.