Location of South Carolina in the United States of America
Location of South Carolina in the United States of America

The state of South Carolina has many official state symbols, holidays and designations and they have been selected to represent the history, resources, and possibilities of the state. The palmetto and crescent of the state flag is South Carolina's best-known symbol. It is seen on shirts and bumperstickers and is often adapted throughout the state to show support for collegiate teams or interest in particular sports activities.

Symbols of sovereignty

Main articles: Flag of South Carolina and Seal of South Carolina

The state has several symbols that represent its sovereignty and from where it was gained.[1] The state House of Representatives has used a ceremonial mace since 1880. When the House is in session, the mace is placed in a specially designed rack in front of the Speaker of the House. The state Senate uses a sword of state. The current sword of state was a gift from Lord Halifax, a former British ambassador to the United States, and has been in use since 1951. The original sword of state was obtained in 1704 and used by the governor of the South Carolina Colony. The state flag originated to represent the militia that fought for independence in 1776. The Seal of South Carolina was adopted in 1776. The seals of the Senate and House incorporate the sword of state and the mace respectively.

List of state symbols

State symbols (year adopted):[1][2][3]

Boykin Spaniel, state dog
Boykin Spaniel, state dog
Boiled peanuts, state snack
Boiled peanuts, state snack

List of state holidays and observances

Holidays for South Carolina (when state government offices are closed) include[13]

South Carolina observes numerous special days and weeks throughout the year.[14]

List of additional state designations

Camden Military Academy, state military academy
Camden Military Academy, state military academy

See also

References

  1. ^ a b South Carolina General Assembly (2007). Charles F. Reid (ed.). 2007 South Carolina Legislative Manual (88th Edition). Columbia, South Carolina: South Carolina General Assembly.
  2. ^ "South Carolina Code of Laws, State Emblems, Pledge to the Flag, Official Observances". South Carolina General Assembly. Archived from the original on 2007-06-30. Retrieved 2007-07-16.
  3. ^ "SC Statehouse Student's web page, State Symbols and Emblems". South Carolina General Assembly. Archived from the original on 2007-06-22. Retrieved 2007-07-16.
  4. ^ "Virtual Farm Tour – Milk Production". South Carolina Department of Agriculture. Retrieved 2007-07-17.
  5. ^ "Act 200 of 117 Session of the General Assembly of South Carolina". South Carolina General Assembly. Retrieved 2008-05-29.
  6. ^ Dufault, Robert J.; Mary Jackson; Stephen K. Salvo. "Sweetgrass: History, Basketry, and Constraints to Industry Growth". Retrieved 2007-07-17.
  7. ^ "South Carolina Code of Laws, Section 1-1-677". South Carolina General Assembly. Archived from the original on 2007-06-30. Retrieved 2007-07-19.
  8. ^ "2013-2014 Bill 4482 Text of Previous Version (May. 13, 2014)". scstatehouse.gov. Retrieved 23 June 2015.
  9. ^ "Virtual Farm Tour – Peaches". South Carolina Department of Agriculture. Retrieved 2007-07-17.
  10. ^ "Act 240, 2009-2010 Session, South Carolina".
  11. ^ S.C. Code Ann. § 1-1-682
  12. ^ "Act 38, 2011-2012 Session, South Carolina".
  13. ^ "South Carolina Code of Laws, Legal Holidays". South Carolina General Assembly. Retrieved 2007-07-16.
  14. ^ "South Carolina Code of Laws, Special Days". South Carolina General Assembly. Retrieved 2007-07-16.
  15. ^ "South Carolina Home Page". mullinssc.us. Archived from the original on 17 April 2015. Retrieved 23 June 2015.
  16. ^ "SCRMWelcome". scrm.org. Retrieved 23 June 2015.
  17. ^ "The Official South Carolina Hall of Fame". theofficialschalloffame.com. Retrieved 23 June 2015.
  18. ^ ShinRa. "- お肌と毛処理とアレルギー". southcarolinaartisanscenter.org. Retrieved 23 June 2015.