Flag of the governor

The governor of North Dakota is the head of government of the U.S. state of North Dakota.

There have been 32 governors since North Dakota became a state, serving 33 distinct terms, with William Langer having been elected to multiple terms. The current officeholder is Republican Doug Burgum.

Governors

For governors before statehood, see List of governors of Dakota Territory.

Dakota Territory was organized on March 2, 1861;[1] on November 2, 1889, it was split into the states of North Dakota and South Dakota.[2]

The Constitution of North Dakota originally provided for the election of a governor and lieutenant governor every two years, which was changed to four years in 1964.[3] A limit of two terms was added in 2023.[4] The governor and lieutenant governor are elected together on a ticket,[5] and should the office of governor become vacant, the lieutenant governor becomes governor.[6] The term of office begins on the December 15 following the election.[7]

Governors of the State of North Dakota
No. Governor Term in office Party Election Lt. Governor[a]
1   John Miller
(1843–1908)
[8][9]
November 20, 1889[10]

January 7, 1891
(did not run)[8]
Republican[11] 1889   Alfred Dickey
2 Andrew H. Burke
(1850–1918)
[12][13]
January 7, 1891[14]

January 4, 1893
(lost election)
Republican[11] 1890 Roger Allin
3 Eli C. D. Shortridge
(1830–1908)
[15][16]
January 4, 1893[b]

January 9, 1895
(did not run)
Populist[15] 1892 Elmer D. Wallace[c]
4 Roger Allin
(1848–1936)
[20][21]
January 9, 1895[22]

January 7, 1897
(lost nomination)[23]
Republican[11] 1894 John H. Worst
5 Frank A. Briggs
(1858–1898)
[24][25]
January 7, 1897[d]

August 9, 1898
(died in office)
Republican[11] 1896 Joseph M. Devine
6 Joseph M. Devine
(1861–1938)
[28][29]
August 9, 1898[30]

January 3, 1899
(did not run)
Republican[11] Succeeded from
lieutenant
governor
Vacant
7 Frederick B. Fancher
(1852–1944)
[31][32]
January 3, 1899[33]

January 7, 1901
(withdrew)[e]
Republican[11] 1898 Joseph M. Devine
8 Frank White
(1856–1940)
[35][36]
January 7, 1901[37]

January 4, 1905
(did not run)
Republican[11] 1900 David Bartlett
1902
9 Elmore Y. Sarles
(1859–1929)
[38][39]
January 4, 1905[40]

January 9, 1907
(lost election)
Republican[11] 1904
10 John Burke
(1859–1937)
[41][42]
January 9, 1907[43]

January 8, 1913
(did not run)
Democratic[11] 1906 Robert S. Lewis
1908
1910 Usher L. Burdick
11 L. B. Hanna
(1861–1948)
[44][45]
January 8, 1913[46]

January 3, 1917
(did not run)
Republican[11] 1912 Anton Kraabel
1914 John H. Fraine
12 Lynn Frazier
(1874–1947)
[47][48]
January 3, 1917[49]

November 23, 1921
(recalled)[f]
Republican/
Nonpartisan League[47]
1916 Anton Kraabel
1918 Howard R. Wood
1920
13 Ragnvald Nestos
(1877–1942)
[50][51]
November 23, 1921[52]

January 7, 1925
(lost nomination)[50]
Republican/
Independent Voters[50]
1921
(recall)[f]
1922 Frank H. Hyland
14 Arthur G. Sorlie
(1874–1928)
[53][54]
January 7, 1925[55]

August 28, 1928
(died in office)
Republican/
Nonpartisan League[53]
1924 Walter Maddock
1926
15 Walter Maddock
(1880–1951)
[56][57]
August 28, 1928[58]

January 9, 1929
(lost election)
Republican/
Nonpartisan League[56]
Succeeded from
lieutenant
governor
Vacant
16 George F. Shafer
(1888–1948)
[59][60]
January 9, 1929[61]

January 4, 1933
(did not run)[g]
Republican/
Independent Voters[59]
1928 John W. Carr
1930
17 William Langer
(1886–1959)
[62][63]
January 4, 1933[h]

July 19, 1934
(removed)[i]
Republican/
Nonpartisan League[62]
1932 Ole H. Olson
18 Ole H. Olson
(1872–1954)
[68][69]
July 19, 1934[i]

January 7, 1935
(did not run)
Republican/
Nonpartisan League
Succeeded from
lieutenant
governor
Vacant
19 Thomas H. Moodie
(1878–1948)
[70][71]
January 7, 1935[72]

February 2, 1935
(removed)[j]
Democratic[70] 1934 Walter Welford
20 Walter Welford
(1868–1952)
[73][74]
February 2, 1935[75]

January 6, 1937
(lost election)
Republican/
Nonpartisan League[73]
Succeeded from
lieutenant
governor
Vacant
21 William Langer
(1886–1959)
[62][63]
January 6, 1937[76]

January 2, 1939
(did not run)[k]
Independent[62] 1936 Thorstein H. H. Thoresen
22 John Moses
(1885–1945)
[77][78]
January 2, 1939[79]

January 2, 1945
(did not run)[l]
Democratic[77] 1938 Jack A. Patterson
1940 Oscar W. Hagen
1942 Henry Holt
23 Fred G. Aandahl
(1897–1966)
[80][81]
January 2, 1945[82]

January 3, 1951
(did not run)[m]
Republican[80] 1944 Clarence P. Dahl
1946
1948
24 Norman Brunsdale
(1891–1978)
[83][84]
January 3, 1951[85]

January 7, 1957
(did not run)
Republican[83] 1950 Ray Schnell
1952 Clarence P. Dahl
1954
25 John E. Davis
(1913–1990)
[86][87]
January 7, 1957[88]

January 3, 1961
(did not run)[n]
Republican[86] 1956 Francis Clyde Duffy
1958 Clarence P. Dahl
26 William L. Guy
(1919–2013)
[89][90]
January 3, 1961[91]

January 2, 1973
(did not run)[89]
Democratic–
Nonpartisan League
[89]
1960 Orville W. Hagen
1962 Frank A. Wenstrom
1964 Charles Tighe
1968 Richard F. Larsen
27 Arthur A. Link
(1914–2010)
[92][93]
January 2, 1973[94]

January 6, 1981
(lost election)
Democratic–
Nonpartisan League
[92]
1972 Wayne Sanstead
1976
28 Allen I. Olson
(b. 1938)
[95]
January 6, 1981[96]

December 31, 1984
(lost election)
Republican[95] 1980 Ernest Sands
29 George A. Sinner
(1928–2018)
[97]
January 1, 1985[o]

December 15, 1992
(did not run)
Democratic–
Nonpartisan League
[97]
1984 Ruth Meiers
1988 Lloyd Omdahl
30 Ed Schafer
(b. 1946)
[100]
December 15, 1992[101]

December 15, 2000
(did not run)
Republican[100] 1992 Rosemarie Myrdal
1996
31 John Hoeven
(b. 1957)
[102]
December 15, 2000[103]

December 7, 2010
(resigned)[p]
Republican[102] 2000 Jack Dalrymple
2004
2008
32 Jack Dalrymple
(b. 1948)
[104]
December 7, 2010[105]

December 15, 2016
(did not run)
Republican[104] Succeeded from
lieutenant
governor
Drew Wrigley
2012
33 Doug Burgum
(b. 1956)
[106]
December 15, 2016[107]

Incumbent[q]
Republican[106] 2016 Brent Sanford
2020
Tammy Miller

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Lieutenant governors represented the same party as their governor unless noted.
  2. ^ Sources disagree on when Shortridge took office; Sobel says January 2,[15] the State Historical Society says January 3,[17] one contemporary news source says Shortridge qualified on January 3,[18] and Shortridge delivered his inaugural address (dated January 3) to the legislature on January 4.[19]
  3. ^ Represented the Democratic-Independent Party
  4. ^ Sources disagree on when Briggs took office; Sobel says January 8,[24] the State Historical Society says January 6,[26] and a contemporary news source says he was sworn in on January 7,[27] which notes that inaugural proceedings were delayed by the death of Briggs' daughter.
  5. ^ Fancher was nominated by the Republican Party, but withdrew from the election due to health concerns.[34]
  6. ^ a b Frazier was recalled and Nestos elected to replace him in a special election.
  7. ^ Shafer instead ran unsuccessfully for the Republican nomination to the United States Senate.[59]
  8. ^ Sources disagree on when Langer took office; the State Historical Society says December 31, 1932,[64] but contemporary news indicates it was on January 4, 1933, the matter being complicated because Langer was ill and unable to attend..[65]
  9. ^ a b Langer was removed from office following his conviction of felony conspiracy to defraud the federal government; he was later cleared.[62] He was convicted on June 17 and Lieutenant Governor Ole H. Olson immediately moved to take over, receiving the oath of office.[66] The Supreme Court ruled Langer was ineligible on July 17, and Olson formally took office on July 19.[67]
  10. ^ The Supreme Court ruled that Moodie did not meet residency requirements to run for governor, and so removed him.[70]
  11. ^ Langer instead ran unsuccessfully for the United States Senate.[62]
  12. ^ Moses was instead elected to the United States Senate.[77]
  13. ^ Aandahl was instead elected to the United States House of Representatives.[80]
  14. ^ Davis instead ran unsuccessfully for the United States Senate.[86]
  15. ^ Sinner took the oath of office on December 31, so that he would become governor at midnight on January 1; Olson claimed that his term did not end until January 5, and refused to leave office. The Supreme Court ruled on January 4 that Sinner was governor, and had been since January 1.[98][99]
  16. ^ Hoeven resigned, having been elected to the United States Senate.
  17. ^ Burgum's second term began December 15, 2020, and will expire on December 15, 2024. Burgum is retiring by the end of his term

References

General
  • "Former North Dakota Governors". National Governors Association. Retrieved May 30, 2023.
  • Sobel, Robert (1978). Biographical directory of the governors of the United States, 1789-1978, Vol. III. Meckler Books. ISBN 9780930466008. Retrieved May 9, 2023.
  • Kallenbach, Joseph Ernest (1977). American State Governors, 1776-1976. Oceana Publications. ISBN 978-0-379-00665-0. Retrieved September 23, 2023.
  • Dubin, Michael J. (2014). United States Gubernatorial Elections, 1861-1911: The Official Results by State and County. McFarland. ISBN 978-0-7864-5646-8.
  • Glashan, Roy R. (1979). American Governors and Gubernatorial Elections, 1775-1978. Meckler Books. ISBN 978-0-930466-17-6.
  • "Our Campaigns - Governor of North Dakota - History". www.ourcampaigns.com. Retrieved July 25, 2023.
Specific
  1. ^ 12 Stat. 239
  2. ^ 25 Stat. 676
  3. ^ "North Dakota State and County Official Term Lengths, Initiative 5 (1964)". Retrieved May 30, 2023.
  4. ^ "North Dakota Constitutional Measure 1, Term Limits for Governor and State Legislators Initiative (2022)". Retrieved May 30, 2023.
  5. ^ ND Const. art. V, § 3
  6. ^ ND Const. art. V, § 11
  7. ^ ND Const. art. V, § 5
  8. ^ a b Sobel 1978, p. 1171.
  9. ^ "John Miller". National Governors Association. Retrieved May 30, 2023.
  10. ^ "The Legislature". Bismarck Weekly Tribune. November 22, 1889. p. 8. Retrieved May 30, 2023.
  11. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Kallenbach 1977, pp. 450–451.
  12. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1171–1172.
  13. ^ "Andrew Horace Burke". National Governors Association. Retrieved May 30, 2023.
  14. ^ North Dakota Legislative Assembly. Journal of the House of Representatives. 1891 sess., 34, accessed May 30, 2023
  15. ^ a b c Sobel 1978, p. 1172.
  16. ^ "Eli C. D. Shortridge". National Governors Association. Retrieved May 30, 2023.
  17. ^ "Eli C. D. Shortridge". North Dakota Governors Online. State Historical Society of North Dakota. Retrieved May 30, 2023.
  18. ^ "North Dakota Legislature Gets in Motion". Chicago Tribune. January 4, 1893. p. 2. Retrieved May 30, 2023.
  19. ^ North Dakota Legislative Assembly. Journal of the House of Representatives. 1893 sess., 33, accessed May 30, 2023
  20. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1172–1173.
  21. ^ "Roger Allin". National Governors Association. Retrieved May 30, 2023.
  22. ^ North Dakota Legislative Assembly. Journal of the House of Representatives. 1895 sess., 35, accessed May 30, 2023
  23. ^ "Briggs the Man". The Washburn Leader. July 25, 1896. p. 4. Retrieved May 30, 2023.
  24. ^ a b Sobel 1978, p. 1173.
  25. ^ "Frank Arlington Briggs". National Governors Association. Retrieved May 30, 2023.
  26. ^ "Frank A. Briggs". North Dakota Governors Online. State Historical Society of North Dakota. Retrieved May 30, 2023.
  27. ^ "The Legislature". Courier Democrat. January 14, 1897. p. 2. Retrieved May 30, 2023.
  28. ^ Sobel 1978, p. 1174.
  29. ^ "Joseph McMurray Devine". National Governors Association. Retrieved May 30, 2023.
  30. ^ "Briggs Is Dead!". The Hope Pioneer. August 11, 1898. p. 1. Retrieved May 30, 2023.
  31. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1174–1175.
  32. ^ "Frederick Bartlett Fancher". National Governors Association. Retrieved May 30, 2023.
  33. ^ "North Dakota Officers Inaugurated". The Bottineau Courant. January 7, 1899. p. 1. Retrieved May 30, 2023.
  34. ^ "Fancher Resigns". Jamestown Weekly Alert. September 27, 1900. p. 1. Retrieved May 30, 2023.
  35. ^ Sobel 1978, p. 1175.
  36. ^ "Frank White". National Governors Association. Retrieved May 30, 2023.
  37. ^ "The New Officers". The Bismarck Tribune. January 7, 1901. p. 1. Retrieved May 30, 2023.
  38. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1175–1176.
  39. ^ "Elmore Yocum Sarles". National Governors Association. Retrieved May 30, 2023.
  40. ^ "New Administration Is Nicely Launched". The Bismarck Tribune. January 5, 1905. p. 1. Retrieved May 30, 2023.
  41. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1176–1177.
  42. ^ "John Burke". National Governors Association. Retrieved May 30, 2023.
  43. ^ "Now Gov. Burke". The Bismarck Tribune. January 10, 1907. p. 5. Retrieved May 30, 2023.
  44. ^ Sobel 1978, p. 1177.
  45. ^ "Louis Benjamin Hanna". National Governors Association. Retrieved May 30, 2023.
  46. ^ "A Republican Administration". The Bismarck Tribune. January 9, 1913. p. 4. Retrieved May 30, 2023.
  47. ^ a b Sobel 1978, pp. 1177–1178.
  48. ^ "Lynn Joseph Frazier". National Governors Association. Retrieved May 30, 2023.
  49. ^ "Intense Enthusiasm Marks New Regime at State Capitol". The Bismarck Tribune. January 3, 1917. p. 1. Retrieved May 30, 2023.
  50. ^ a b c Sobel 1978, pp. 1178–1179.
  51. ^ "Ragnvold Anderson Nestos". National Governors Association. Retrieved May 30, 2023.
  52. ^ "New Governor Kindles Pride in State, Pledges Economy. Asks Strife Be Forgotten". The Bismarck Tribune. November 23, 1921. p. 1. Retrieved May 30, 2023.
  53. ^ a b Sobel 1978, p. 1179.
  54. ^ "Arthur Gustav Sorlie". National Governors Association. Retrieved May 30, 2023.
  55. ^ "Sorlie, Nestos Both Speak; New Governor Inaugurated Before Joint Session Today". The Bismarck Tribune. January 7, 1925. p. 1. Retrieved May 30, 2023.
  56. ^ a b Sobel 1978, pp. 1179–1180.
  57. ^ "Walter Maddock". National Governors Association. Retrieved May 30, 2023.
  58. ^ "Governor Sorlie Dead from Fight with Heart Disease". The Bismarck Tribune. August 28, 1928. p. 1. Retrieved May 30, 2023.
  59. ^ a b c Sobel 1978, p. 1180.
  60. ^ "George Frederick Shafer". National Governors Association. Retrieved May 30, 2023.
  61. ^ "Governor Shafer Takes Post". The Bismarck Tribune. January 9, 1929. p. 1. Retrieved May 30, 2023.
  62. ^ a b c d e f Sobel 1978, p. 1181.
  63. ^ a b "William Langer". National Governors Association. Retrieved May 30, 2023.
  64. ^ "William Langer". North Dakota Governors Online. State Historical Society of North Dakota. Retrieved May 30, 2023.
  65. ^ "New Officers Take Hold and Name Deputies". Morning Pioneer. Associated Press. January 4, 1933. p. 1. Retrieved May 30, 2023.
  66. ^ "New Rockford Man Moves to Assume Duties of Office". The Bismarck Tribune. June 18, 1934. p. 1. Retrieved May 30, 2023.
  67. ^ "Acting Governor Takes Control of Executive Office". The Bismarck Tribune. July 19, 1934. p. 1. Retrieved May 30, 2023.
  68. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1181–1182.
  69. ^ "Ole H. Olson". National Governors Association. Retrieved May 30, 2023.
  70. ^ a b c Sobel 1978, p. 1182.
  71. ^ "Thomas Hilliard Moodie". National Governors Association. Retrieved May 30, 2023.
  72. ^ "Moodie Becomes N.D. Governor". The Bismarck Tribune. January 7, 1935. p. 1. Retrieved May 31, 2023.
  73. ^ a b Sobel 1978, p. 1183.
  74. ^ "Walter Welford". National Governors Association. Retrieved May 30, 2023.
  75. ^ "Supreme Court Holds Moodie Disqualified by Constitution". The Bismarck Tribune. February 2, 1935. p. 9. Retrieved May 31, 2023.
  76. ^ "Grand March Climaxes Inaugural". The Bismarck Tribune. January 7, 1937. p. 1. Retrieved May 31, 2023.
  77. ^ a b c Sobel 1978, pp. 1183–1184.
  78. ^ "John Moses". National Governors Association. Retrieved May 30, 2023.
  79. ^ "Langer Ends His Regime". Reno Gazette-Journal. Associated Press. January 2, 1939. p. 2. Retrieved May 31, 2023.
  80. ^ a b c Sobel 1978, p. 1184.
  81. ^ "Fred George Aandahl". National Governors Association. Retrieved May 30, 2023.
  82. ^ "Aandahl, Other New State Officers Begin Duties". The Bismarck Tribune. January 2, 1945. p. 1. Retrieved May 31, 2023.
  83. ^ a b Sobel 1978, p. 1185.
  84. ^ "C. Norman Brunsdale". National Governors Association. Retrieved May 30, 2023.
  85. ^ "Family, Friends of New Governor Attend Inaugural". The Bismarck Tribune. January 3, 1951. p. 1. Retrieved May 31, 2023.
  86. ^ a b c Sobel 1978, pp. 1185–1186.
  87. ^ "John Edward Davis". National Governors Association. Retrieved May 30, 2023.
  88. ^ "John Davis Is Sworn In at Capitol". The Bismarck Tribune. January 9, 1957. p. 1. Retrieved May 31, 2023.
  89. ^ a b c Sobel 1978, p. 1186.
  90. ^ "William Lewis Guy". National Governors Association. Retrieved May 30, 2023.
  91. ^ "Guy Urges Austerity for N.D." The Bismarck Tribune. Associated Press. January 4, 1961. p. 1. Retrieved May 31, 2023.
  92. ^ a b Sobel 1978, p. 1187.
  93. ^ "Link Takes Oath As State Head". The Bismarck Tribune. Associated Press. January 3, 1973. p. 24. Retrieved May 31, 2023.
  94. ^ a b "Allen Ingvar Olson". National Governors Association. Retrieved May 30, 2023.
  95. ^ Baenen, Jeff (January 7, 1981). "Olson Begins Term". The Bismarck Tribune. Associated Press. p. 3. Retrieved May 31, 2023.
  96. ^ a b "George Albert Sinner". National Governors Association. Retrieved May 30, 2023.
  97. ^ Sellnow, Greg (January 5, 1985). "Supreme Court Tells Olson to Pack It In". The Bismarck Tribune. p. 1A. Retrieved May 31, 2023.
  98. ^ Sellnow, Greg (January 5, 1985). "Justices Unanimously Support Sinner". The Bismarck Tribune. p. 1A. Retrieved May 31, 2023.
  99. ^ a b "Edward Thomas Schafer". National Governors Association. Retrieved May 30, 2023.
  100. ^ Donatelle, Kristine (December 16, 1992). "Governor Fills Key Posts". The Bismarck Tribune. p. 1A. Retrieved May 31, 2023.
  101. ^ a b "John Hoeven". National Governors Association. Retrieved May 30, 2023.
  102. ^ Wetzel, Dale (December 16, 2000). "Hoeven's First Day Full of Decisions". The Bismarck Tribune. Associated Press. p. 1A. Retrieved May 31, 2023.
  103. ^ a b "Jack Dalrymple". National Governors Association. Retrieved May 30, 2023.
  104. ^ Beitsch, Rebecca (December 8, 2010). "It's Official, Governor". The Bismarck Tribune. p. 1A. Retrieved May 31, 2023.
  105. ^ a b "Doug Burgum". National Governors Association. Retrieved May 30, 2023.
  106. ^ Holgate, Julie (December 15, 2016). "Doug Burgum Takes Office As Nd Governor Today". Valley News Live. Retrieved May 31, 2023.