Monastrol
Monastrol.svg
Monastrol.3D.png
Names
IUPAC name
ethyl 4-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-6-methyl-2-sulfanylidene-3,4-dihydro-1H-pyrimidine-5-carboxylate
Other names
Monastrol
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChEBI
ChEMBL
ChemSpider
  • InChI=1S/C14H16N2O3S/c1-3-19-13(18)11-8(2)15-14(20)16-12(11)9-5-4-6-10(17)7-9/h4-7,12,17H,3H2,1-2H3,(H2,15,16,20) ☒N
    Key: LOBCDGHHHHGHFA-UHFFFAOYSA-N checkY
  • InChI=1/C14H16N2O3S/c1-3-19-13(18)11-8(2)15-14(20)16-12(11)9-5-4-6-10(17)7-9/h4-7,12,17H,3H2,1-2H3,(H2,15,16,20)
    Key: LOBCDGHHHHGHFA-UHFFFAOYAO
  • CCOC(=O)C1=C(NC(=S)NC1C2=CC(=CC=C2)O)C
Properties
C14H16N2O3S
Molar mass 292.35344
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
☒N verify (what is checkY☒N ?)

Monastrol is a cell-permeable small molecule inhibitor discovered by Thomas U. Mayer in the lab of Tim Mitchison. Monastrol was shown to inhibit the kinesin-5 (also known as KIF11, Kinesin Eg5), a motor protein important for spindle bipolarity.[1]

Mechanism of action

Monastrol inhibits Eg5
Monastrol inhibits Eg5

Monastrol binds to a long loop that is specific to the Eg5 (also known as KIF11 or kinesin-5) kinesin family, and allosterically inhibits ATPase activity of the kinesin [2]

References

  1. ^ Thomas U. Mayer; Tarun M. Kapoor; Stephen J. Haggarty; Randall W. King; Stuart L. Schreiber; Timothy J. Mitchison (1999). "Small Molecule Inhibitor of Mitotic Spindle Bipolarity Identified in a Phenotype-Based Screen". Science. 286 (5441): 971–974. doi:10.1126/science.286.5441.971. PMID 10542155. S2CID 15348455.
  2. ^ Maliga Z, Kapoor TM, Mitchison TJ (September 2002). "Evidence that monastrol is an allosteric inhibitor of the mitotic kinesin Eg5". Chem. Biol. 9 (9): 989–96. doi:10.1016/S1074-5521(02)00212-0. PMID 12323373.