Hispidulin
Hispidulin.svg
Names
IUPAC name
4′,5,7-Trihydroxy-6-methoxyflavone
Preferred IUPAC name
5,7-Dihydroxy-2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-6-methoxy-4H-1-benzopyran-4-one
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChEBI
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.229.713 Edit this at Wikidata
EC Number
  • 802-856-8
KEGG
UNII
  • InChI=1S/C16H12O6/c1-21-16-11(19)7-13-14(15(16)20)10(18)6-12(22-13)8-2-4-9(17)5-3-8/h2-7,17,19-20H,1H3
    Key: IHFBPDAQLQOCBX-UHFFFAOYSA-N
  • InChI=1/C16H12O6/c1-21-16-11(19)7-13-14(15(16)20)10(18)6-12(22-13)8-2-4-9(17)5-3-8/h2-7,17,19-20H,1H3
    Key: IHFBPDAQLQOCBX-UHFFFAOYAV
  • COc1c(O)cc2oc(cc(=O)c2c1O)-c1ccc(O)cc1
Properties
C16H12O6
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).

Hispidulin is a naturally occurring flavone with potential antiepileptic activity in rats and gerbils.[1][2] It is found in plants including Grindelia argentina, Arrabidaea chica, Saussurea involucrate, Crossostephium chinense, Artemisia, and Salvia.[3]

Complementary medicine

In traditional and complementary medicine it is claimed to have "antioxidant, antifungal, anti-inflammatory, antimutagenic, and antineoplastic properties".[3]

Notes

  1. ^ Hispidulin inhibits the release of glutamate in rat cerebrocortical nerve terminals. Lin TY1, Lu CW, Wang CC, Lu JF, Wang SJ. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 2012 Sep 1;263(2):233-43. doi: 10.1016/j.taap.2012.06.015. Epub 2012 Jul 1.
  2. ^ The flavone hispidulin, a benzodiazepine receptor ligand with positive allosteric properties, traverses the blood–brain barrier and exhibits anticonvulsive effects, Dominique Kavvadias et al, British Journal of Pharmacology (2004) 142, 811–820
  3. ^ a b Kanika Patel, Dinesh Kumar Patel, Medicinal importance, pharmacological activities, and analytical aspects of hispidulin: A concise report, Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine, 2016, ISSN 2225-4110, https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jtcme.2016.11.003.