Alphenal
Alphenal.svg
Alphenal ball-and-stick animation.gif
Clinical data
Other names5-Phenyl-5-allylbarbituric acid
Routes of
administration
Oral
ATC code
  • none
Legal status
Legal status
Identifiers
  • 5-phenyl-5-prop-2-enyl-1,3-diazinane-2,4,6-trione
CAS Number
PubChem CID
ChemSpider
UNII
CompTox Dashboard (EPA)
ECHA InfoCard100.003.718 Edit this at Wikidata
Chemical and physical data
FormulaC13H12N2O3
Molar mass244.250 g·mol−1
3D model (JSmol)
  • O=C1NC(=O)NC(=O)C1(c2ccccc2)C\C=C
  • InChI=1S/C13H12N2O3/c1-2-8-13(9-6-4-3-5-7-9)10(16)14-12(18)15-11(13)17/h2-7H,1,8H2,(H2,14,15,16,17,18) checkY
  • Key:WOIGZSBYKGQJGL-UHFFFAOYSA-N checkY
  (verify)

Alphenal (Alphenal, Efrodal, Prophenal, Sanudorm), also known as 5-allyl-5-phenylbarbituric acid, is a barbiturate derivative developed in the 1920s.[1] It has primarily anticonvulsant properties, and was used occasionally for the treatment of epilepsy or convulsions, although not as commonly as better known barbiturates such as phenobarbital.[2][3] [4][5]

LD50: Mouse (Oral): 280 mg/kg

References

  1. ^ DE 526854, "Verfahren zur Darstellung von C,C-disubstituierten Barbitursaeuren", issued 11 June 1931, assigned to Hoffmann La Roche 
  2. ^ Carissimi M (1962). "Nuovi Barbiturici Alogenati Farmaco". Ediozione Scientifica. 17 (6): 390–413.
  3. ^ Martin JR, Godel T, Hunkeler W, Jenck F, Moreau JL, Sleight AJ, Widmer U (December 2000). "Psychopharmacological Agents". Kirk‐Othmer Encyclopedia of Chemical Technology. doi:10.1002/0471238961.1619250313011820.a01. ISBN 0471238961.
  4. ^ Brandenberger H, Maes RA (1997). Analytical Toxicology: For Clinical, Forensic, and Pharmaceutical Chemists. Walter de Gruyter. p. 348. ISBN 978-3-11-010731-9. Retrieved 19 May 2012.
  5. ^ García PC, Cruz SV, Mirón CE (28 January 2005). Fundamentos de síntesis de fármacos. Edicions Universitat Barcelona. p. 161. ISBN 978-84-475-2876-9. Retrieved 19 May 2012.