Omaha Storm Chasers
Omaha Storm Chasers logo.svg
Chasers cap.png
Team logo Cap insignia
Minor league affiliations
ClassTriple-A (1969–present)
LeagueInternational League (2022–present)
DivisionWest Division
Previous leagues
Major league affiliations
TeamKansas City Royals (1969–present)
Minor league titles
Class titles (3)
  • 1990
  • 2013
  • 2014
League titles (7)
  • 1969
  • 1970
  • 1978
  • 1990
  • 2011
  • 2013
  • 2014
Conference titles (4)
  • 2011
  • 2012
  • 2013
  • 2014
Division titles (15)
  • 1970
  • 1976
  • 1977
  • 1978
  • 1981
  • 1982
  • 1988
  • 1989
  • 1990
  • 1996
  • 1999
  • 2011
  • 2012
  • 2013
  • 2014
Team data
NameOmaha Storm Chasers (2011–present)
Previous names
  • Omaha Royals (2002–2010)
  • Omaha Golden Spikes (1999–2001)
  • Omaha Royals (1969–1998)
ColorsRoyal blue, twister gold, blackout black[1]
     
MascotsStormy, Casey the Lion, Vortex, Sue Nami, and Sizzle[2]
BallparkWerner Park (2011–present)
Previous parks
Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium (1969–2010)
Owner(s)/
Operator(s)
Alliance Baseball
PresidentMartie Cordaro[3]
General managerLaurie Schlender[3]
ManagerMike Jirschele

The Omaha Storm Chasers are a Minor League Baseball team of the International League and the Triple-A affiliate of the Kansas City Royals. They are located in Papillion, Nebraska, a suburb southwest of Omaha, and play their home games at Werner Park, which opened in 2011. The team previously played at Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium from 1969 to 2010.

Omaha has been the only Triple-A affiliate of the Kansas City Royals since their inception in the 1969 Major League Baseball expansion. They were originally known as the Omaha Royals when established as a member of the Triple-A American Association in 1969. They joined the Pacific Coast League (PCL) in 1998 and were briefly known as the Omaha Golden Spikes (1999–2001) before reverting to their Royals moniker. Omaha became the Storm Chasers in 2011. In conjunction with Major League Baseball's restructuring of Minor League Baseball in 2021, the team was placed in the Triple-A East, which rebranded as the International League in 2022.

Omaha has won seven league championships. Most recently, they won back-to-back PCL championships in 2013 and 2014. They previously won the PCL title in 2011. They also won the American Association championship in 1969, 1970, 1978, and 1990. Omaha went on to win the Triple-A Classic in 1990 and the Triple-A National Championship Game in 2013 and 2014.

History

Prior professional baseball in Omaha

Omaha has been home to Minor League Baseball teams since the late 19th century. The city's professional baseball history dates back to 1879 with the formation of the Omaha Green Stockings, who were charter members of the Northwestern League.[4] They were followed by other teams, such as the Omahogs, Lambs, Indians, Rangers, Rourkes, Buffaloes, Crickets, and Packers, that competed in either the Western League or Western Association through 1936.[4] The Omaha Cardinals were the city's team from 1947 to 1959 as members of the Class A Western League before joining the Triple-A American Association in 1955.[4] After having no team in 1960, the Omaha Dodgers represented the city in the American Association from 1961 to 1962.[4] The league disbanded after the 1962 season,[5] leaving Omaha without professional baseball for the next six years.[4]

American Association (1969–1997)

The Omaha Royals were established in 1969 as members of the American Association (AA) to serve as the Triple-A affiliate of the Kansas City Royals,[6][7] who were a product of the 1969 Major League Baseball expansion.[8] Omaha's team was named for and owned by their Major League Baseball (MLB) affiliate.[9] Their home ballpark was Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium, which was built in 1948.[10]

The Omaha Royals played at Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium from 1969 to 2010.
The Omaha Royals played at Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium from 1969 to 2010.

Managed by Jack McKeon in their inaugural 1969 season,[11] the Royals won the American Association championship with an 85–55 record, six games ahead of the second-place Tulsa Oilers.[12] McKeon was selected for the AA Manager of the Year Award.[13] In 1970, he led the Royals to win the Eastern Division title with a 73–65 record.[14] In the best-of-seven postseason playoffs, Omaha defeated the Denver Bears, 4–1, to win their second league championship.[14] They then advanced to the Junior World Series to face the Syracuse Chiefs, champions of the Triple-A International League, but they lost the series, 4–1.[15] McKeon won a second Manager of the Year Award, and outfielder George Spriggs was selected as the AA Most Valuable Player (MVP).[13] Though Omaha was unable to qualify for the playoffs over the next five seasons, two Royals were chosen for league awards during this stretch: second baseman Jim Wohlford as the 1972 Rookie of the Year and Mark Littell as the 1973 Most Valuable Pitcher.[13]

In 1976 and 1977, the Royals won back-to-back Eastern Division titles but lost both seasons' league championships to Denver.[16][17] Outfielder Clint Hurdle was selected as the 1977 AA Rookie of the Year.[13] Behind manager John Sullivan,[18] Omaha won the 1978 Western Division title before winning their third American Association championship over the Indianapolis Indians, 4–1.[19] The team next qualified for the playoffs in 1981 and 1982 but lost in the championship round each time, first to Denver and then Indianapolis.[20] Joe Sparks won the Manager of the Year Award in 1981, and third baseman Manny Castillo was the same season's MVP.[13]

In February 1985, Kansas City sold the Omaha Royals to Chicago businessman Irving "Gus" Cherry for an undisclosed sum, citing financial losses from operating their own Triple-A club; their major league affiliation continued.[21] Meanwhile, in the midst of another postseason drought from 1983 to 1987, Mark Huismann won the 1985 Most Valuable Pitcher Award.[13]

Omaha won three consecutive Western Division titles from 1988 to 1989. On the first two occasions, they lost the AA championship to Indianapolis in the single-round playoffs.[22][23] First baseman Luis de los Santos was the 1988 league MVP.[13] Then, manager Sal Rende guided the team to a fourth American Association title with a 3–2 series win over the Nashville Sounds in 1990.[24][25] The Royals capped off the season by winning the Triple-A Classic versus the International League champion Rochester Red Wings, 4–1.[15] Rende was voted the league's Manager of the Year.[13]

The team was sold to the Union Pacific Railroad and minority investors Warren Buffett and Walter Scott for US$5 million following the 1991 season.[26] From 1991 to 1997, the Royals made two postseason appearances in which they were eliminated in both the 1995 and 1996 semifinals.[27][28] The 1994 season saw outfielder Dwayne Hosey selected as league MVP and first baseman Joe Vitiello win Rookie of the Year.[13]

Pacific Coast League (1998–2020)

The American Association, of which the Royals had been members since 1969, disbanded after the 1997 season, and its teams were absorbed by the two remaining Triple-A leagues—the International League and Pacific Coast League (PCL). Omaha joined the PCL, becoming one of the easternmost team in the circuit.[29] Though they did not qualify for the playoffs, two Royals outfielders were selected for league awards in the team's first PCL season: Chris Hatcher as the Most Valuable Player and Jeremy Giambi as Rookie of the Year.[30]

The team was briefly known as the Golden Spikes (1999–2001) in honor of the golden spike driven to complete the first transcontinental railroad (shown).
The team was briefly known as the Golden Spikes (1999–2001) in honor of the golden spike driven to complete the first transcontinental railroad (shown).

In early 1998, Omaha began considering a name change to distinguish the Royals from their major league affiliate and to market the minor league club as Omaha's team rather than Kansas City's Triple-A affiliate.[31] Fans and team officials voted to rebrand as the Omaha Golden Spikes beginning with the 1999 seasons.[32] The name was a reference to the golden spike driven at Promontory Summit, Utah, to celebrate the completion of the first transcontinental railroad in 1869. It was intended to celebrate the rich railroad tradition in Omaha, headquarters of the Union Pacific Railroad.[32] The Golden Spikes won the 1999 American Conference Midwest Division title but lost the American Conference title to the Oklahoma RedHawks.[33] Outfielder Mark Quinn was voted the PCL's Rookie of the Year that season.[30]

Union Pacific sold their 50-percent share in the team to Connecticut businessman Matt Minker in early 2001; Buffett and Scott retained their minority interests.[34] Shortly thereafter, the team launched a fan vote to see about changing the team's name, which had been associated with Union Pacific and proved to be unpopular with many fans.[34] As a result, the team switched back to being the Omaha Royals beginning with the 2002 season as fans cited a wish to continue with the tradition associated with the name, which had been in use from 1969 to 1998.[35] Minker later sold his interest in the team to Kentucky businessman Bill Shea in 2006.[36]

From 2000 to 2010, the Royals regularly finished in third or fourth place out of four teams in their division, which left them out of the playoff picture.[6] The team experienced several changes over the next few years. The 2010 season became the last that the team played at Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium, their home field since 1969.[10] The team moved into the new $26-million Werner Park in 2011.[37] Prior to opening the new facility, the team rebranded as the Omaha Storm Chasers following rounds of fan submissions and voting. The name references storm chasers, people who pursue any severe weather phenomena for various purposes; the state, and Omaha itself, being in Tornado Alley, have been havens for many such chasers.[1]

The 2011 Pacific Coast League champion Omaha Storm Chasers
The 2011 Pacific Coast League champion Omaha Storm Chasers

The Storm Chasers' played their first home game at Werner Park on April 16, 2011, defeating the Nashville Sounds, 2–1, before 6,533 people in attendance.[38] Manager Mike Jirschele led Omaha to a 79–63 record and the American Conference Northern Division title, which gave the team their first postseason berth since 1999.[39][40] They defeated the Round Rock Express, 3–1, in the best-of-five American Conference series to advance to the league finals.[39] The Storm Chasers won their first Pacific Coast League championship by sweeping the Sacramento River Cats, 3–0, in the best-of-five championship round.[39] The win gave Omaha a spot in the Triple-A National Championship Game, a single game to determine a champion of Triple-A baseball, versus the International League champion Columbus Clippers, which they lost, 8–3.[41] Jirschele won the Mike Coolbaugh Award,[42] and Luis Mendoza was selected as the PCL Pitcher of the Year.[30]

Jirschele's Storm Chasers returned to the playoffs in 2012 by virtue of winning the division and won a second American Conference title, but they were defeated in the championship round by the Reno Aces, 3–1.[40][43] In 2013 with Jirschele at the helm,[40] Omaha finished the season at 70–74 with another division title.[44] After besting the Oklahoma City RedHawks, 3–0, for the conference title, they won a second PCL championship over the Salt Lake Bees, 3–1.[44] Returning to the Triple-A National Championship Game, Omaha defeated the International League's Durham Bulls, 2–1, for their first class-level title since 1990.[45] Managed by Brian Poldberg in 2014,[46] Omaha won their fourth consecutive American Conference Northern Division title on the heels of a 76–67 season.[47] After winning the conference title over the Memphis Redbirds, 3–1, Omaha won back-to-back PCL championships with a 3–2 series win over Reno.[47] They also repeated as Triple-A champions by defeating the Pawtucket Red Sox, 4–2.[48]

In the midst of a four-year playoff run, which would be Omaha's last in the PCL, the team's ownership changed hands in 2012. Bill Shea, Warren Buffett, and Walter Scott sold the team to Alliance Baseball LLC, led by managing owner Gary Green.[49] The Storm Chasers did not qualify for the postseason from 2015 to 2019. The start of the 2020 season was initially postponed due to the COVID-19 pandemic before being cancelled altogether.[50][51]

Triple-A East / International League (2021–present)

Bobby Witt Jr. was chosen as the 2021 Triple-A East Top MLB Prospect.

In conjunction with Major League Baseball's restructuring of Minor League Baseball in 2021, the Storm Chasers were placed in the Triple-A East.[52] No playoffs were held to determine a league champion; instead, the team with the best regular-season record was declared the winner.[53] Omaha ended the season in eighth place with a 66–54 record.[54] However, 10 games that had been postponed from the start of the season were reinserted into the schedule as a postseason tournament called the Triple-A Final Stretch in which all 30 Triple-A clubs competed for the highest winning percentage.[53] Omaha finished the tournament tied for fourth place with a 7–2 record.[55] Jackson Kowar was selected as the league's Pitcher of the Year, and shortstop Bobby Witt Jr. was chosen as its Top MLB Prospect.[56] In 2022, the Triple-A East became known as the International League (IL), the name historically used by the regional circuit prior to the 2021 reorganization.[57]

Season-by-season records

Key
League The team's final position in the league standings
Division The team's final position in the divisional standings
GB Games behind the team that finished in first place in the division that season
Class champions Class champions (1970–present)
League champions League champions (1969–present)
§ Conference champions (1998–2020)
* Division champions (1970–present)
^ Postseason berth (1981–1997)
Season-by-season records
Season League Regular-season Postseason MLB affiliate Ref.
Record Win % League Division GB Record Win % Result
1969
League champions
AA 85–55 .607 1st Won AA championship[12] Kansas City Royals [58]
1970
* League champions
AA 73–65 .529 1st 1st 5–5 .500 Won Eastern Division title
Won AA championship vs. Denver Bears, 4–1[14]
Lost Junior World Series vs. Syracuse Chiefs, 4–1[15]
Kansas City Royals [59]
1971 AA 69–70 .496 5th 3rd 15 Kansas City Royals [60]
1972 AA 71–69 .507 4th 2nd 12 Kansas City Royals [61]
1973 AA 62–73 .459 6th 4th 20+12 Kansas City Royals [62]
1974 AA 54–82 .397 8th 4th 24+12 Kansas City Royals [63]
1975 AA 67–69 .493 6th 3rd 10 Kansas City Royals [64]
1976
*
AA 78–58 .574 2nd 1st 2–4 .333 Won Eastern Division title
Lost AA championship title vs. Denver Bears, 4–2[16]
Kansas City Royals [65]
1977
*
AA 76–59 .563 1st 1st 2–4 .333 Won Eastern Division title
Lost AA championship title vs. Denver Bears, 4–2[16]
Kansas City Royals [66]
1978
* League champions
AA 66–69 .489 4th 1st 4–1 .800 Won Western Division title
Won AA championship vs. Indianapolis Indians, 4–1[19]
Kansas City Royals [67]
1979 AA 65–71 .478 6th 2nd 7+12 Kansas City Royals [68]
1980 AA 66–70 .485 4th 3rd 26 Kansas City Royals [69]
1981
^ *
AA 79–57 .581 1st 1st 3–6 .333 Won Western Division title
Won semifinals vs. Springfield Redbirds, 3–2
Lost AA championship vs. Denver Bears, 4–0[70]
Kansas City Royals [71]
1982
*
AA 71–66 .518 4th 1st 2–4 .333 Won Western Division title
Lost AA championship vs. Indianapolis Indians, 4–2[72]
Kansas City Royals [73]
1983 AA 64–72 .471 6th (tie) 4th 10 Kansas City Royals [74]
1984 AA 68–86 .442 8th 23 Kansas City Royals [75]
1985 AA 73–69 .514 4th 3rd 6 Kansas City Royals [76]
1986 AA 72–70 .507 4th 3rd 4 Kansas City Royals [77]
1987 AA 64–76 .457 7th (tie) 15 Kansas City Royals [78]
1988
*
AA 81–61 .570 2nd 1st 1–3 .250 Won Western Division title
Lost AA championship vs. Indianapolis Indians, 3–1[22]
Kansas City Royals [79]
1989
*
AA 74–72 .507 3rd (tie) 1st 2–3 .400 Won Western Division title
Lost AA championship vs. Indianapolis Indians, 3–2[23]
Kansas City Royals [80]
1990
* League champions Class champions
AA 86–60 .589 1st 1st 4–6 .700 Won Western Division title
Won AA championship vs. Nashville Sounds, 3–2[25]
Won Triple-A Classic vs. Rochester Red Wings, 4–1[15]
Kansas City Royals [81]
1991 AA 73–71 .507 5th 3rd 6 Kansas City Royals [82]
1992 AA 67–77 .465 6th (tie) 3rd 7 Kansas City Royals [83]
1993 AA 70–74 .486 5th 3rd 15 Kansas City Royals [84]
1994 AA 68–76 .472 6th 18+12 Kansas City Royals [85]
1995
^
AA 76–68 .528 3rd 12 1–3 .250 Lost semifinals vs. Buffalo Bisons, 3–1[27] Kansas City Royals [86]
1996
*
AA 79–65 .549 2nd 1st 1–3 .250 Won Western Division title
Lost semifinals vs. Oklahoma City 89ers, 3–1[28]
Kansas City Royals [87]
1997 AA 61–83 .424 7th 4th 13+12 Kansas City Royals [88]
1998 PCL 79–64 .552 4th (tie) 2nd 5+12 Kansas City Royals [89]
1999
*
PCL 81–60 .574 3rd 1st 1–3 .250 Won American Conference Midwest Division title
Lost American Conference title vs. Oklahoma RedHawks, 3–1[33]
Kansas City Royals [90]
2000 PCL 64–79 .448 11th 3rd 21+12 Kansas City Royals [91]
2001 PCL 70–74 .486 10th 3rd 13+12 Kansas City Royals [92]
2002 PCL 76–68 .528 4th 2nd 2 Kansas City Royals [93]
2003 PCL 70–73 .490 11th 4th 3+12 Kansas City Royals [94]
2004 PCL 71–73 .493 9th 3rd 8+12 Kansas City Royals [95]
2005 PCL 72–72 .500 8th 2nd 3 Kansas City Royals [96]
2006 PCL 53–91 .368 16th 4th 23 Kansas City Royals [97]
2007 PCL 73–71 .507 8th (tie) 3rd 16 Kansas City Royals [98]
2008 PCL 63–81 .438 14th 3rd 21 Kansas City Royals [99]
2009 PCL 64–80 .444 13th 3rd 13 Kansas City Royals [100]
2010 PCL 81–63 .563 3rd 3rd 1 Kansas City Royals [101]
2011
* § League Champions
PCL 79–63 .556 3rd 1st 6–2 .750 Won American Conference Northern Division title
Won American Conference title vs Round Rock Express, 3–1
Won PCL championship vs Sacramento River Cats, 3–0[39]
Lost Triple-A championship vs Columbus Clippers[41]
Kansas City Royals [102]
2012
* §
PCL 83–61 .576 2nd 1st 4–5 .444 Won American Conference Northern Division title
Won American Conference title vs. Albuquerque Isotopes, 3–2
Lost PCL championship vs. Reno Aces, 3–1[43]
Kansas City Royals [103]
2013
* § League Champions Class Champions
PCL 70–74 .486 10th 1st 7–1 .875 Won American Conference Northern Division title
Won American Conference title vs. Oklahoma City RedHawks, 3–0
Won PCL championship vs. Salt Lake Bees, 3–1[44]
Won Triple-A championship vs. Durham Bulls[45]
Kansas City Royals [104]
2014
* § League Champions Class Champions
PCL 76–67 .531 6th 1st 7–3 .700 Won American Conference Northern Division title
Won American Conference title vs. Memphis Redbirds, 3–1
Won PCL championship vs. Reno Aces, 3–2[47]
Won Triple-A championship vs. Pawtucket Red Sox[48]
Kansas City Royals [105]
2015 PCL 80–64 .556 3rd (tie) 2nd (tie) 6 Kansas City Royals [106]
2016 PCL 58–82 .414 16th 4th 22+12 Kansas City Royals [107]
2017 PCL 69–72 .489 8th (tie) 3rd 13 Kansas City Royals [108]
2018 PCL 66–74 .471 12th (tie) 3rd 9 Kansas City Royals [109]
2019 PCL 59–80 .424 16th 4th 15+12 Kansas City Royals [110]
2020 PCL Season cancelled (COVID-19 pandemic)[51] Kansas City Royals [111]
2021 AAAE 66–54 .550 8th 2nd 3 7–2 .778 Won series vs. Indianapolis Indians, 3–2
Won series vs. Iowa Cubs, 4–0
Placed 4th (tie) in the Triple-A Final Stretch[55]
Kansas City Royals [54]
2022 IL 71–78 .477 14th 7th 20 Kansas City Royals [112]
Totals 3,752–3,731 .501 59–58 .504

Uniforms

Jakob Junis (left) and Allan de San Miguel (right) wearing Omaha's alternate powder blue jerseys
Jakob Junis (left) and Allan de San Miguel (right) wearing Omaha's alternate powder blue jerseys

Omaha has several sets of uniforms. The home whites have "Storm Chasers" across the chest and the player's number below in royal blue and gold, with royal blue piping around the neck, down the center of the jersey, and around the two sleeves. A Kansas City Royals patch adorns the left sleeve. The number on the back is a larger version of the one on the front, with the player's name arching above it in blue. The white pants have a blue line running up both legs and are capped off with a blue belt.[113] The primary hat is solid royal blue with a spinning tornado logo (Vortex) on the front.[114]

One alternate jersey is powder blue with "Storm Chasers" across the front, similar to the home whites. These are often paired with a solid powder blue cap with an interlocking "SC" styled as a mixture of a tornado and a baseball.[115] The player's number is located on the back in white.[116] A second alternate is solid royal blue with a logo on the left chest resembling an "O" with parts of a lightning bolt extending diagonally from the top and bottom.[117] The player's number appears on the back in gold.[118] These are worn with solid blue caps bearing the same gold logo as on the jersey.[117] A third alternate is black with a large O/lightning bolt logo in powder blue on the center with lightning bolts of the same color around the sides of the jersey.[119] The player's name is on the back in powder blue.[120] These are paired with a powder blue cap with a black bill and black O/lightning bolt logo on the front.[119]

Roster

Players Coaches/Other

Pitchers

Catchers

Infielders

Outfielders

Designated hitters

Manager

Coaches

60-day injured list

Injury icon 2.svg
7-day injured list
* On Kansas City Royals 40-man roster
~ Development list
# Rehab assignment
∞ Reserve list
‡ Restricted list
§ Suspended list
† Temporarily inactive list
Roster updated September 8, 2022
Transactions
→ More rosters: MiLB • International League
Kansas City Royals minor league players

Achievements

Awards

George Spriggs won the 1970 American Association Most Valuable Player Award.
Jim Wohlford won the 1972 American Association Rookie of the Year Award.
Luis Mendoza won the 2011 Pacific Coast League Pitcher of the Year Award.

One member of the team has received an award issued by Minor League Baseball.

Minor League Baseball awards
Award Recipient Season Ref.
Mike Coolbaugh Award Mike Jirschele 2011 [42]

Fifteen players and three managers have won league awards in recognition for their performance with Omaha.[13][30][56]

American Association awards
Award Recipient Season Ref.
Most Valuable Player George Spriggs 1970 [13]
Most Valuable Player Manny Castillo 1981 [13]
Most Valuable Player Luis de los Santos 1988 [13]
Most Valuable Player Dwayne Hosey 1994 [13]
Most Valuable Pitcher Mark Littell 1973 [13]
Most Valuable Pitcher Mark Huismann 1985 [13]
Rookie of the Year Jim Wohlford 1972 [13]
Rookie of the Year Clint Hurdle 1977 [13]
Rookie of the Year Joe Vitiello 1994 [13]
Manager of the Year Joe Sparks 1981 [13]
Manager of the Year Jack McKeon 1969 [13]
Manager of the Year Jack McKeon 1970 [13]
Manager of the Year Sal Rende 1990 [13]
Pacific Coast League awards
Award Recipient Season Ref.
Most Valuable Player Chris Hatcher 1998 [30]
Pitcher of the Year Luis Mendoza 2011 [30]
Rookie of the Year Jeremy Giambi 1998 [30]
Rookie of the Year Mark Quinn 1999 [30]
Triple-A East / International League awards
Award Recipient Season Ref.
Pitcher of the Year Jackson Kowar 2021 [56]
Top MLB Prospect Bobby Witt Jr. 2021 [56]

Retired numbers

The number 27 was retired in honor of former catcher and manager Brian Poldberg.
The number 27 was retired in honor of former catcher and manager Brian Poldberg.

The Storm Chasers have honored five individuals by retiring their uniform numbers.[121] This ensures that the number will be associated with one player of particular importance to the team. The Kansas City Royals' retired numbers are also retired throughout their minor league organization. Three such numbers (5, 10, and 20) are thusly also retired in Omaha, while two others (23 and 27) are retired for Omaha personnel.[122] An additional number (42) was retired across professional baseball to honor Jackie Robinson, the first African American to play in Major League Baseball in the modern era.[123]

No. Name Season(s) Position Ref.
5 George Brett 1973–1974 Omaha infielder [121]
10 Dick Howser 1981–1987 Kansas City manager [121]
20 Frank White 1973 Omaha infielder [121]
23 Mike Jirschele 1988–1989 / 1995–1997, 2003–2013 Omaha infielder / manager [121]
27 Brian Poldberg 1983–1985 / 2014–2021 Omaha catcher / manager [121]
42 Jackie Robinson Second baseman [121]

Ownership

Warren Buffett (left) was a minority shareholder from 1991 to 2012, and Gary Green (right) has been the managing owner since 2012.
Warren Buffett (left) was a minority shareholder from 1991 to 2012, and Gary Green (right) has been the managing owner since 2012.

Since being established in 1969, Omaha has had six majority owners.[9]

Seasons Owner(s) Ref.
1969–1985 Kansas City Royals [21]
1985–1991 Gus Cherry [26]
1991–2001 Union Pacific Railroad (majority), Warren Buffett and Walter Scott (minority) [9]
2001–2006 Matt Minker (majority), Warren Buffett and Walter Scott (minority) [9]
2006–2012 Bill Shea (majority), Warren Buffett and Walter Scott (minority) [9]
2012–present Alliance Baseball, LLC (Gary Green, managing owner) [9]

References

Specific

  1. ^ a b "'Omaha Storm Chasers' New Name for Triple-A Team". Minor League Baseball. November 15, 2010. Retrieved August 20, 2022.
  2. ^ "Werner Park Guide". Omaha Storm Chasers. Minor League Baseball. Retrieved August 20, 2022.
  3. ^ a b "Front Office Staff". Omaha Storm Chasers. Minor League Baseball. Retrieved August 20, 2022.
  4. ^ a b c d e "Sports in Omaha, Nebraska". Stats Crew. Retrieved August 20, 2022.
  5. ^ "Notable Events in American Association History". Triple-A Baseball. Archived from the original on April 14, 2021. Retrieved June 5, 2022.((cite web)): CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)
  6. ^ a b "Omaha, Nebraska Encyclopedia". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved August 22, 2022.
  7. ^ "Omaha Fields AAA Club for Kansas City". The Alliance Times-Herald. Alliance. August 22, 1968. p. 4 – via Newspapers.com.
  8. ^ "Franchise Timeline - 1960s". Kansas City Royals. Major League Baseball. Retrieved August 22, 2022.
  9. ^ a b c d e f Omaha Storm Chasers Media Guide 2022, p. 109.
  10. ^ a b "Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium". Stats Crew. Retrieved August 22, 2022.
  11. ^ "1969 Omaha Royals Statistics". Stats Crew. Retrieved August 22, 2022.
  12. ^ a b "1969 American Association". Stats Crew. Retrieved June 5, 2022.
  13. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w "American Association Special Award Winners". Triple-A Baseball. Archived from the original on April 21, 2021. Retrieved August 18, 2022.
  14. ^ a b c "1970 American Association Standings". Stats Crew. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  15. ^ a b c d "Triple-A Baseball Interleague Post-Season Play Results". Triple-A Baseball. Archived from the original on July 10, 2019. Retrieved August 22, 2022.((cite web)): CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)
  16. ^ a b c "1976 American Association Standings". Stats Crew. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  17. ^ "1977 American Association Standings". Stats Crew. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  18. ^ "1978 Omaha Royals Statistics". Stats Crew. Retrieved August 22, 2022.
  19. ^ a b "1978 American Association Standings". Stats Crew. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  20. ^ "American Association Playoff Results". Triple-A Baseball. Archived from the original on February 28, 2020. Retrieved August 23, 2022.((cite web)): CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)
  21. ^ a b "Omaha Royals Bought by Chicago Businessman". The Lincoln Star. Lincoln. February 20, 1985. p. 36 – via Newspapers.com.
  22. ^ a b "1988 American Association Standings". Stats Crew. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  23. ^ a b "1989 American Association Standings". Stats Crew. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  24. ^ "1990 Omaha Royals Statistics". Stats Crew. Retrieved August 22, 2022.
  25. ^ a b "1990 American Association Standings". Stats Crew. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  26. ^ a b "Omaha Royals' Sale Approved". Democrat and Chronicle. Rochester. February 20, 1985. p. 4D – via Newspapers.com.
  27. ^ a b "1995 American Association Standings". Stats Crew. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  28. ^ a b "1996 American Association Standings". Stats Crew. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  29. ^ "Notable Events in American Association History". Triple-A Baseball. Archived from the original on April 14, 2021. Retrieved May 26, 2017.
  30. ^ a b c d e f g h "Pacific Coast League Award Winners". Pacific Coast League. Minor League Baseball. Archived from the original on February 6, 2022. Retrieved August 19, 2022.
  31. ^ "Omaha Royals Consider Getting New Nickname". The Columbus Telegram. Columbus. March 12, 1998. p. 1B – via Newspapers.com.
  32. ^ a b "Golden Spikes New Nickname for O. Royals". Lincoln Star Journal. Lincoln. August 31, 1998. p. 3D – via Newspapers.com.
  33. ^ a b "1999 Pacific Coast League Standings". Stats Crew. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
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