Salt Lake Bees
Salt Lake Bees team logo.svg
Minor league affiliations
ClassTriple-A (1994–present)
LeaguePacific Coast League (2022–present)
DivisionWest Division
Previous leagues
Major league affiliations
TeamLos Angeles Angels (2001–present)
Previous teamsMinnesota Twins (1994–2000)
Minor league titles
League titles (0)None
Conference titles (3)
  • 2000
  • 2002
  • 2013
Division titles (8)
  • 1995
  • 1999
  • 2000
  • 2002
  • 2006
  • 2007
  • 2008
  • 2013
Second-half titles (1)1995
Team data
NameSalt Lake Bees (2006–present)
Previous names
Salt Lake Stingers (2001–2005)
Salt Lake Buzz (1994–2000)
ColorsBlack, gold, white[1]
     
MascotBumble
BallparkSmith's Ballpark (1994–present)
Owner(s)/
Operator(s)
Gail Miller
General managerMarc Amicone[3]
ManagerLou Marson[2]

The Salt Lake Bees are a Minor League Baseball team of the Pacific Coast League (PCL) and the Triple-A affiliate of the Los Angeles Angels. They are located in Salt Lake City, Utah, and play their home games at Smith's Ballpark. The ballpark opened in 1994 and has a seating capacity of 15,411, the largest in their league. The team was previously known as the Salt Lake Buzz (1994–2000) and Salt Lake Stingers (2001–2005) before adopting their Bees moniker in 2006. They have competed in the PCL since 1994, including the 2021 season when it was known as the Triple-A West.

History

Prior professional baseball in Salt Lake City

After the 1914 Pacific Coast League season, Salt Lake City businessman Bill "Hardpan" Lane purchased the Sacramento Solons and brought the team to Utah as the Salt Lake City Bees. Though a charter member of the PCL, the Solons suffered on the field and at the gate, being exiled at times to Tacoma, Fresno, and San Francisco. On March 31, 1915, their first game was played with 10,000 fans pouring into Majestic Park (later renamed Bonneville Park) to cheer the Bees to a 9–3 win over the Vernon Tigers.[Salt Lake Telegram, April 1, 1915, p. 3]

The original Bees never won a PCL pennant, but they did draw attendees well, especially considering the small market size. Other PCL team owners, though, resented the high cost of travel to Salt Lake City. When the Vernon Tigers abandoned Los Angeles after the 1925 season, it was suggested to Lane that he would do well to transfer his team to southern California. So after eleven seasons, the Bees moved to Los Angeles for the 1926 season. At first known as the Hollywood Bees, the team soon became the Hollywood Stars. After ten seasons in Hollywood, the team transferred again, to San Diego, where it played as the San Diego Padres from 1936 to 1968. Salt Lake City was without a baseball team until 1946 when it received a franchise in the Pioneer League.[4]

Salt Lake Bees (1994–present)

An entrance gate to Smith's Ballpark (former stadium name Spring Mobile Ballpark pictured), home of the Bees
An entrance gate to Smith's Ballpark (former stadium name Spring Mobile Ballpark pictured), home of the Bees

The current franchise dates from 1994, when Joe Buzas, a former major league player and the owner of the PCL Portland Beavers, moved the team to Salt Lake City. Buzas made a deal wherein the city would build a new ballpark on the site of historic Derks Field in exchange for relocating the team. The new ballpark, Franklin Quest Field, opened in 1994 with the renamed Salt Lake Buzz drawing 713,224 fans to home games during their inaugural season—breaking the PCL single-season attendance record that had stood for 48 years.[5] Buzas owned the team until his death in 2003. The team was purchased by Larry H. Miller, who also owned the NBA's Utah Jazz. Miller died in February 2009, and the team was owned by his widow, Gail Miller until it was sold to Ryan Smith in 2021.[6]

Known as the Salt Lake Buzz from 1994 to 2000, the team changed its name to the Salt Lake Stingers in 2001. The change was forced by a trademark dilution lawsuit filed by Georgia Tech, whose yellowjacket mascot is named Buzz.[7]

Following the 2005 season, the team announced the Stingers would henceforth be known as the Salt Lake Bees, the name of the original PCL franchise which played in Salt Lake City from 1915 to 1926 and from 1958 to 1965.[4] The team also chose a logo, jersey, and color scheme similar to the latter Bees PCL franchise.[8][9] Bees have long been a symbol of Utah. The original name of the Mormon settlement, Deseret, is said to be the word for "honeybee" in the Book of Mormon; a beehive appears on the Utah state flag; the state motto is "Industry" (for which bees are known); and Utah is widely known as the "Beehive State."[10]

In 2019, the Bees announced a new logo, name, and branding for the team, taking on the name "Abejas de Salt Lake" for their ongoing participation in The Copa de la Diversión.[11]

In conjunction with Major League Baseball's restructuring of Minor League Baseball in 2021, the Bees were organized into the Triple-A West.[12] Salt Lake ended the season in fifth place in the Western Division with a 49–70 record.[13] No playoffs were held to determine a league champion; instead, the team with the best regular-season record was declared the winner.[14] However, 10 games that had been postponed from the start of the season were reinserted into the schedule as a postseason tournament called the Triple-A Final Stretch in which all 30 Triple-A clubs competed for the highest winning percentage.[14] Salt Lake finished the tournament tied for seventh place with a 6–4 record.[15] In 2022, the Triple-A West became known as the Pacific Coast League, the name historically used by the regional circuit prior to the 2021 reorganization.[16]

Season-by-season records

Table key
League The team's final position in the league standings
Division The team's final position in the divisional standings
GB Games behind the team that finished in first place in the division that season
Class champions Class champions (1998–present)
League champions League champions (1994–present)
§ Conference champions (1998–2020)
* Division champions (1994–present)
^ Postseason berth (1994–1997)
Season-by-season records
Season League Regular-season Postseason MLB affiliate Ref.
Record Win % League Division GB Record Win % Result
1994
^
PCL 74–70 .514 4th (tie) 2nd 4 2–3 .400 Lost Northern Division title vs. Vancouver Canadians, 3–2[17] Minnesota Twins [18]
1995
^ *
PCL 79–65 .549 3rd 2nd 3+12 5–4 .556 Won Second Half Northern Division title
Won Northern Division title vs. Vancouver Canadians, 3–1
Lost PCL championship vs. Colorado Springs Sky Sox, 3–2[19]
Minnesota Twins [20]
1996
^
PCL 78–66 .542 2nd 2nd 7 1–3 .250 Lost Northern Division title vs. Edmonton Trappers, 3–1[21] Minnesota Twins [22]
1997 PCL 72–71 .503 6th 4th 7+12 Minnesota Twins [23]
1998 PCL 79–64 .552 4th (tie) 2nd 2 Minnesota Twins [24]
1999
*
PCL 73–68 .518 6th 1st 2–3 .400 Won Pacific Conference Southern Division title
Lost Pacific Conference title vs. Vancouver Canadians, 3–2[25]
Minnesota Twins [26]
2000
* §
PCL 90–53 .629 1st 1st 4–5 .444 Won Pacific Conference Northern Division title
Won Pacific Conference title vs. Sacramento River Cats, 3–2
Lost PCL championship vs. Memphis Redbirds, 3–1[27]
Minnesota Twins [28]
2001 PCL 79–64 .552 4th 2nd 4 Anaheim Angels [29]
2002
* §
PCL 78–66 .542 3rd 1st 4–3 .571 Won American Conference Central Division title
Won American Conference title vs. Oklahoma RedHawks, 3–0
Lost PCL championship vs. Edmonton Trappers, 3–1[30]
Anaheim Angels [31]
2003 PCL 68–75 .476 13th 3rd 5+12 Anaheim Angels [32]
2004 PCL 56–88 .389 16th 4th 28 Anaheim Angels [33]
2005 PCL 79–65 .549 4th 2nd 1 Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim [34]
2006
*
PCL 81–63 .563 3rd 1st 1–3 .250 Won Pacific Conference Northern Division title
Lost Pacific Conference title vs. Tucson Sidewinders, 3–1
Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim [35]
2007
*
PCL 74–69 .517 7th 1st 2–3 .400 Won Pacific Conference Northern Division title
Lost Pacific Conference title vs. Sacramento River Cats, 3–2
Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim [36]
2008
*
PCL 84–60 .583 2nd 1st 1–3 .250 Won Pacific Conference Northern Division title
Lost Pacific Conference title vs. Sacramento River Cats, 3–1
Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim [37]
2009 PCL 72–71 .503 8th 3rd 1+12 Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim [38]
2010 PCL 73–71 .507 8th 2nd 1+12 Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim [39]
2011 PCL 62–82 .431 16th 4th 15 Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim [40]
2012 PCL 73–71 .507 10th 3rd 8 Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim [41]
2013
* §
PCL 78–66 .542 4th 1st 4–4 .500 Won Pacific Conference Northern Division title
Won Pacific Conference title vs. Las Vegas 51s, 3–1
Lost PCL championship vs. Omaha Storm Chasers, 3–1
Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim [42]
2014 PCL 60–84 .417 15th 4th 21 Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim [43]
2015 PCL 58–86 .403 15th (tie) 4th 20 Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim [44]
2016 PCL 63–79 .444 15th 4th 9+12 Los Angeles Angels [45]
2017 PCL 72–70 .507 7th 2nd 1 Los Angeles Angels [46]
2018 PCL 71–68 .511 8th 2nd 11 Los Angeles Angels [47]
2019 PCL 60–79 .432 11th 3rd 22+12 Los Angeles Angels [48]
2020 PCL Season cancelled (COVID-19 pandemic)[49] Los Angeles Angels [50]
2021 AAAW 49–70 .412 9th 5th 23+12 6–4 .600 Won series vs. Sacramento River Cats, 4–1
Lost series vs. Tacoma Rainiers, 3–2
Placed 7th (tie) in the Triple-A Final Stretch[15]
Los Angeles Angels [13]
Totals 1,935–1,904 .504 32–38 .457

Roster

Players Coaches/Other

Pitchers

Catchers

Infielders

Outfielders


Manager

Coaches

  • 13 Brian Bethancourth (hitting)
  • 53 Jairo Cuevas (pitching)
  •  4 Ray Olmedo (defense)


Injury icon 2.svg
7-day injured list
* On Los Angeles Angels 40-man roster
~ Development list
# Rehab assignment
∞ Reserve list
‡ Restricted list
§ Suspended list
† Temporarily inactive list
Roster updated August 9, 2022
Transactions
→ More rosters: MiLB • Pacific Coast League
Los Angeles Angels minor league players

Notable past players


Venue

The Bees play at Smith's Ballpark. It was formerly known as Franklin Covey Field. It was renamed in 2014.[6]

Mascot

The team mascot is a large bee named Bumble.[6]

References

  1. ^ "Classic Baseball Returns to Salt Lake". Salt Lake Bees (Press release). Minor League Baseball. October 27, 2005. Archived from the original on February 10, 2006. Retrieved May 20, 2019.
  2. ^ "Bees, Angels Announce 2019 Field Staff". SLBees.com. MLB Advanced Media. February 19, 2019. Retrieved May 20, 2019.
  3. ^ "Front Office Information". SLBees.com. MLB Advanced Media. Retrieved May 20, 2019.
  4. ^ a b "Salt Lake City, Utah Encyclopedia". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved October 3, 2019.
  5. ^ Facer, Dirk (August 29, 1997). "Buzz attendance falls but still tops PCL". Deseret News.
  6. ^ a b c Bollinger, Rhett. "Explore Salt Lake City's Smith's Ballpark". MLB.com. Retrieved April 26, 2022.
  7. ^ Lange, Scott (April 24, 1998). "Like Buzz, if I could be like Buzz..." The Technique. Retrieved May 18, 2007.
  8. ^ https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/1487/1618/products/Salt-Lake-Bees-1959-Home-Patch_grande.jpg?v=1526313096[bare URL image file]
  9. ^ https://i.pinimg.com/originals/c5/73/a4/c573a4cbd75af38ce80891773c2d49d4.gif[bare URL image file]
  10. ^ Vice, Jeff (April 16, 1998). "The hats, the jerseys, the pants and even". The Deseret News. Retrieved April 26, 2022.
  11. ^ "Bees Unveil New Abejas de Salt Lake Logos". Major League Baseball. March 18, 2019.
  12. ^ Mayo, Jonathan (February 12, 2021). "MLB Announces New Minors Teams, Leagues". Major League Baseball. Retrieved February 12, 2021.
  13. ^ a b "2021 Triple-A West Standings". Minor League Baseball. Retrieved October 5, 2021.
  14. ^ a b "MiLB Announces 'Triple-A Final Stretch' for 2021". Minor League Baseball. July 14, 2021. Retrieved July 16, 2021.
  15. ^ a b "2021 Triple-A Final Stretch Standings". Minor League Baseball. Retrieved October 5, 2021.
  16. ^ "Historical League Names to Return in 2022". Minor League Baseball. March 16, 2022. Retrieved March 16, 2022.
  17. ^ "1994 Pacific Coast League Standings". Stats Crew. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  18. ^ "1994 Pacific Coast League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  19. ^ "1995 Pacific Coast League Standings". Stats Crew. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
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  27. ^ "2000 Pacific Coast League Standings". Stats Crew. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  28. ^ "2000 Pacific Coast League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  29. ^ "2001 Pacific Coast League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
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  33. ^ "2004 Pacific Coast League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  34. ^ "2005 Pacific Coast League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  35. ^ "2006 Pacific Coast League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  36. ^ "2007 Pacific Coast League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
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  38. ^ "2009 Pacific Coast League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  39. ^ "2010 Pacific Coast League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  40. ^ "2011 Pacific Coast League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  41. ^ "2012 Pacific Coast League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
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  49. ^ "2020 Minor League Baseball Season Shelved". Minor League Baseball. June 30, 2020. Retrieved July 1, 2020.
  50. ^ "2020 Schedule" (PDF). Nashville Sounds. Minor League Baseball. Archived (PDF) from the original on August 5, 2020. Retrieved August 5, 2020.
  51. ^ Jorgensen, Loren (July 29, 2008). "Salt Lake Bees: Green heats up to power Bees". Deseret News. Deseret Digital Media. Retrieved March 13, 2010.
  52. ^ Aragon, Andrew (June 10, 2008). "Salt Lake Bees: Figgins is back for Bees' win". Deseret News. Deseret Digital Media. Retrieved March 13, 2010.
  53. ^ "Torres pitches Rainiers past Salt Lake". Seattle Post-Intelligencer. August 7, 1996. Archived from the original on November 3, 2012. Retrieved March 13, 2010.
  54. ^ Gripp, Heather (October 19, 2002). "Angels Rookies: Dreams really do come true for them rookies go from minors to being in World Series". Los Angeles Daily News. Archived from the original on November 3, 2012. Retrieved March 13, 2010.
  55. ^ Ringwood, Jon (July 8, 2008). "Salt Lake Bees: Team rallies in 9th inning to snap losing streak". Deseret News. Deseret Digital Media. Retrieved March 13, 2010.
  56. ^ Jorgensen, Loren (August 30, 2008). "Celebration letdown: Grizzlies ground Bees". Deseret News. Deseret Digital Media. Retrieved March 13, 2010.
  57. ^ "Weaver limits Tucson in Bees debut". Deseret News. April 9, 2006. Retrieved August 20, 2021.
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  60. ^ Johnston, Jerry Earl (July 1, 2009). "Salt Lake Bees: Kendrick likes his Utah ties". Deseret News. Retrieved August 20, 2021.