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Stand in Opposition (imprints in front of Old City Hall, Boston)
Stand in Opposition (imprints in front of Old City Hall, Boston)

In politics, the opposition comprises one or more political parties or other organized groups that are opposed, primarily ideologically, to the government (or, in American English, the administration), party or group in political control of a city, region, state, country or other political body. The degree of opposition varies according to political conditions. For example, in authoritarian and liberal systems, opposition may be respectively repressed or desired.[1]

See also

References

  1. ^ Blondel, J (1997). "Political opposition in the contemporary world". Government and Opposition. 32 (4): 462–486. doi:10.1111/j.1477-7053.1997.tb00441.x. Archived from the original on 2013-01-05.