Persian Blue
 
Common connotations
Lapis lazuli; Celestial sphere; Heaven
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet#1C39BB
sRGBB (r, g, b)(28, 57, 187)
HSV (h, s, v)(229°, 85%, 73%)
CIELChuv (L, C, h)(31, 94, 263°)
Source[1] and Maerz and Paul[1]
ISCC–NBS descriptorVivid blue
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)

Persian blue comes in three major tones: Persian blue proper: a bright medium blue; medium Persian blue (a medium slightly grayish blue that is slightly indigoish); and a kind of dark blue which is referred to as Persian indigo, dark Persian blue, or regimental, that is much closer to the web color indigo.

Other colors associated with Persia include Persian pink, Persian rose, Persian red, Persian orange and Persian green.

Persian blue

The color Persian blue is named from the blue color of some Persian pottery and the color of tiles used in and on mosques and palaces in Iran and in other places in the Middle East. Persian blue is a representation of the color of the mineral lapis lazuli which comes from Persia and Afghanistan.[citation needed] The color azure is also named after the mineral lapis lazuli.

The first recorded use of Persian blue as a color name in English was in 1669.[2]

Variations

Medium Persian blue

Medium Persian Blue
 
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet#0067A5
sRGBB (r, g, b)(0, 103, 165)
HSV (h, s, v)(203°, 100%, 65%)
CIELChuv (L, C, h)(42, 64, 246°)
SourceISCC-NBS
ISCC–NBS descriptorStrong blue
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)

The medium tone of Persian blue shown at right is the color called Persian blue in color sample #178 of the ISCC-NBS color list.

Persian indigo

Persian Indigo
 
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet#32127A
sRGBB (r, g, b)(50, 18, 122)
HSV (h, s, v)(258°, 85%, 48%)
CIELChuv (L, C, h)(18, 56, 272°)
Source[2]/Maerz and Paul[3]
ISCC–NBS descriptorVivid purplish blue
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)

The color Persian indigo is displayed at right. Another name for this color (seldom used nowadays) is regimental. The color was called regimental because in the 19th century it was commonly used by many nations for navy uniforms.

Persian indigo is named for an association with a product from Persia: Persian cloth dyed with indigo.

The first recorded use of regimental (the original name for the color now called Persian indigo) as a color name in English was in 1912.[4]

In human culture

This Persian-influenced dome in Delhi, India has Persian-blue colored tiles on its outer surface.

Architecture

Military

New Age Metaphysics

Persian carpets

References

  1. ^ The color displayed in the color box above matches the color called Persian blue in the 1930 book by Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color. New York: 1930, McGraw-Hill; the color Persian blue is displayed on page 95, Plate 36, Color Sample L4.
  2. ^ Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color New York:1930 McGraw-Hill Page 201; color sample of Persian blue: Page 95 Plate 36 Color Sample L4
  3. ^ The color displayed in the color box above matches the color called regimental in the 1930 book by Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color New York:1930 McGraw-Hill; the color regimental is displayed on page 117, Plate 47, Color Sample C10.
  4. ^ Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color New York:1930 McGraw-Hill Page 203 (It is also stated under the entry on Persian Blue on page 201 that the color on Plate 47 Color Sample C10 (regimental) is a [darker] tone of Persian Blue.); color sample of Regimental: Page 117 Plate 47 Color Sample C10
  5. ^ Picture of the Interior of the Shah Mosque: