Storm Athina
Storm Athina over Italy on 7 October
TypeExtratropical cyclone
Formed4 October 2021
Dissipated11 October 2021
Lowest pressure1010[1] mb (29.83 inHg)
Maximum rainfall>900 mm (35 in) in Rossiglione
FatalitiesNone reported
Damage>$80 million (2021 USD)[2]
Power outagesUnknown
Areas affectedSpain, Italy, Greece, Slovenia, Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia, Montenegro, North Macedonia, Albania

Storm Athina was an early extratropical cyclone that was most notable for its damages it brought to Greece and Italy during early-October 2021. The first storm to be officially named in conjunction with the naming list of the former, Israel and Cyprus, Athina formed on 6 October over central Italy before taking an erratic track across the country and into the Ionian Sea, until near Albania and Greece. It then slowly weakened before it dissipated on 11 October as it moved over the latter and emerging into the Aegean Sea. The Free University of Berlin tracked the system as Christian into its initial and dissipating stages.

The precursor to Athina caused record-heavy rainfall in Italy's Liguria Region, where Rossiglione collected over 900 mm (35 in) in an 12-hour period and Savona at 540 mm (21 in), causing flash floods and a landslide. A red alert was placed for Savona and Genoa, along with these effects. Damages in these areas were estimated by the Aon Benfield at more than $80 million (2021 USD).[2] Many rescues across the country and nearby Greece were also performed. Ships were moored, schools were closed and several flights were diverted due to Athina. Reports of hailstorms were also documented on these countries. Overall, no deaths were reported but there was an unknown number of injuries in Catania, Italy.

After the storm, over €20 million of emergency grant was approved for Evia in Greece, one of areas in Greece that was the worst-affected of the storm. Mantoudi-Limni-Agia Anna's residents also asked for financial aid while Agia in Larissa was requested to be placed on state of calamity due to the aftermath of Athina.

Meteorological history

The predecessor to Athina can be traced back along the Atlantic Ocean near Spain from an occluded front on 1 October, in which the Free University of Berlin named it ‘’Benni’’.[3] On the next day, while crossing through the Iberian Peninsula, the FUB named the front ‘’Christian’’ before it emerged onto the Balearic Sea and into the Mediterranean Sea on 3 October, still connected to the frontal system of Benni which is at that time, located over the North Sea.[4][5] Christian moved over Italy on 4 October as it started to move northwestwards, this time now connected to another occluded front, in which the FUB named as ‘’Engelbert’’. It then moved slightly eastwards over its central portion on the next day before stalling there on 6 October. At this time, a trough of warm air aloft (trowal) is centered over the Mediterranean Sea, extending from near Albania, to the Ionian Sea over the Libyan coast.[6][7][8] At that day, the Hellenic National Meteorological Service of Greece officially named it ‘’Athina’’, the first from the agency's collaborated naming lists.[9] Its center subsequently entered the Ionian Sea before moving back again into southern Italy, where it stalled there again.[1][10][11] Athina then moved northeastwards as a weakening system, with its center being located near Albania on 10 October before both the HNMS and FUB declared Athina to be dissipated over the next day as it accelerated over Greece and entered the Aegean Sea.[12][13]

Impacts

Greece

After the Hellenic National Meteorological Service named the storm Athina, heavy rain and strong gusts were predicted across the country, particularly in the south and the Ionian Islands, beginning on October 6. The weather service issued weather warnings for the areas that may be affected.[14][15] As a preparation, several ships along Greece's Zakynthos and Kefalonia ports were tied into safety while all primary and secondary schools in Corfu and Paxos were closed ahead of time. Many ship operations were also affected by the storm and citizens along the storm's course received 112 text warnings to prepare for Athina.[16][17]

Corfu and Paxos were the first regions in Greece to be hit by the storm's heavy rains and severe gusts. There was some minor street flooding in the former, but no damage reports were reported on any of the two islands. Both Zagora and Pelion experienced approximately 700 mm (28 in) of rain, which is more than twice the quantity of rain that fell in Athens. Four flights were diverted into the capital or to other public airports throughout the country. The reduced visibility caused by Athina was blamed by the management of Corfu International Airport.[17][18][19] The storm's rainfall also spawned several landslides that disrupted traffic along the areas of Pyli and Kalabaka while its winds downed trees that damaged cars in Thessaloniki. Including the area, three more places were raided by fire marshall authorities over calls for help to remove obstructing trees and other objects strewn on public roads.[20] Euboea (also known as Evia) had significant damage to its roads, as well as flash floods that briefly halted transportation. A beach in Mantoudi-Limni-Agia Anna, a municipality in central Greece, was destroyed by floods, while fields were flooded. Due of Athena's impact, its mayor advised residents to avoid unnecessary travel. Hailstorms were also reported along the Nileos and Strofilia communities.[21] Northern Evia, Magnesia Prefecture, and western Peloponnese were the hardest hit by the storm, with the floods alone causing significant damage. Authorities in the villages of Achladi, Kotsikia, and Agia Anna tried to rescue stranded residents from their already-flooded homes, but no casualties were reported. The system also caused minor flooding in Athens, as the rains broke a section of a mountain in Makrirrachi. The fire department received over 157 calls for assistance, most of which were for tree or water pump destruction.[18]

Following the storm, a 20 million ($23.209 million, 2021 USD) emergency grant was announced for northern Evia's rehabilitation. Following the disaster in the municipality, the badly impacted residents of Mantoudi-Limni-Agia Anna also requested governmental assistance. Due to the extensive devastation left by Athina, Agia inLarissa were also placed under a request for the area to be declared a state of emergency.[22][23]

Italy

Athina's predecessor's heavy rainfall caused major flooding across Liguria, creating several disruptions. On October 4, Rossiglione received 900 mm (35 in)of rain while Savona received 540 mm (21 in), both records. It shattered the previous record of 472 mm (18.6 in) set in November 2011 in the same area. Due to the rainfall, three river banks overflowed, causing several rescues and floods in the cities and municipalities surrounding the reservoirs. As a result of these effects, railway and transportation operations were seriously affected. As a result, schools and other public places, particularly in Genoa, were temporarily closed to the public. In addition, a high river current in Quiliano washed out a public bridge.[24]

As a result of Athina's precursor, its Civil Protection authority issued the highest warning for disaster effects, a red alert for Savona and Genoa. Italian President Giovanni Toti also urged its people to stop travelling to places that are affected by the storm, when it's unnecessary. Thirty rescues were carried out in Savona alone for trapped and stranded residents. In Ponteinvrea, 5 households were relocated to safety, while rescue workers assisted 13 motorists in reaching safe areas over Rossiglione. 29 persons in Ovada, Alessandria were also rescued due to the Orba River breaking its banks. Landslides were also reported in Rossiglione's mountainous areas, and many tree twigs and branches blocked many public roads, forcing them to close temporarily. Hail was also observed in some sections of the country hit by the storm. Electricity was also briefly disrupted in Sicily, and planes were diverted to other airports owing to the storm along the Palermo Falcone Borsellino Airport. Catania also reported some injuries, but no other details were provided.[24][25][26]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "Prognose 20211007". Institut für Meteorologie. Free University of Berlin (FUB). October 7, 2021. Retrieved November 3, 2021.
  2. ^ a b Global Catastrophe Recap October 2021 (PDF) (Report). Aon. 11 November 2021. Retrieved 22 November 2021.
  3. ^ "Prognose 20211001". Institut für Meteorologie. Free University of Berlin (FUB). October 1, 2021. Archived from the original on November 3, 2021. Retrieved November 3, 2021.
  4. ^ "Prognose 20211002". Institut für Meteorologie. Free University of Berlin (FUB). October 2, 2021. Archived from the original on November 3, 2021. Retrieved November 3, 2021.
  5. ^ "Prognose 20211003". Institut für Meteorologie. Free University of Berlin (FUB). October 3, 2021. Archived from the original on November 3, 2021. Retrieved November 3, 2021.
  6. ^ "Prognose 20211004". Institut für Meteorologie. Free University of Berlin (FUB). October 4, 2021. Archived from the original on November 3, 2021. Retrieved November 3, 2021.
  7. ^ "Prognose 20211005". Institut für Meteorologie. Free University of Berlin (FUB). October 5, 2021. Archived from the original on November 3, 2021. Retrieved November 3, 2021.
  8. ^ "Prognose 20211006". Institut für Meteorologie. Free University of Berlin (FUB). October 6, 2021. Archived from the original on November 3, 2021. Retrieved November 3, 2021.
  9. ^ Hellenic National Meteorological Service [@EMY_HNMS] (October 6, 2021). "Έκτακτο Δελτίο Επικίνδυνων Καιρικών Φαινομένων - Καιρικό Σύστημα "ΑΘΗΝΑ" (Extraordinary Bulletin of Dangerous Weather Phenomena - Weather System "ATHENS")" (Tweet) (in Greek). Archived from the original on October 6, 2021. Retrieved November 3, 2021 – via Twitter.
  10. ^ "Prognose 20211008". Institut für Meteorologie. Free University of Berlin (FUB). October 8, 2021. Retrieved November 3, 2021.
  11. ^ "Prognose 20211009". Institut für Meteorologie. Free University of Berlin (FUB). October 9, 2021. Retrieved November 3, 2021.
  12. ^ "Prognose 20211010". Institut für Meteorologie. Free University of Berlin (FUB). October 10, 2021. Archived from the original on November 3, 2021. Retrieved November 3, 2021.
  13. ^ "Prognose 20211011". Institut für Meteorologie. Free University of Berlin (FUB). October 11, 2021. Retrieved November 3, 2021.
  14. ^ "Καιρός: Έκτακτο δελτίο ΕΜΥ – Έρχεται η κακοκαιρία "Αθηνά"" [Weather: EMY Extraordinary Bulletin - The bad weather "Athena" is coming]. www.kathimerini.gr (in Greek). Archived from the original on November 3, 2021. Retrieved November 2, 2021.
  15. ^ "Κακοκαιρία: Η "Αθηνά" φέρνει ισχυρές βροχές και καταιγίδες – Πού θα είναι έντονα τα φαινόμενα" [Bad weather: "Athena" brings heavy rains and storms - Where will the phenomena be intense]. www.kathimerini.gr (in Greek). Retrieved November 2, 2021.
  16. ^ "Δεμένα τα πλοία σε Ζάκυνθο και Κεφαλονιά λόγω ισχυρών ανέμων" [Ships moored in Zakynthos and Kefalonia due to strong winds]. www.kathimerini.gr (in Greek). Archived from the original on November 3, 2021. Retrieved November 2, 2021.
  17. ^ a b "Κακοκαιρία Αθηνά: Ισχυρή βροχή στην Κέρκυρα, δεμένα πλοία στο Ιόνιο" [Bad weather Athena: Heavy rain in Corfu, moored ships in the Ionian]. www.kathimerini.gr (in Greek). Archived from the original on November 3, 2021. Retrieved November 2, 2021.
  18. ^ a b "Κακοκαιρία "Αθηνά": Σαρωτικό το πέρασμά της από τη χώρα" [Bad weather "Athena": Her passage through the country is sweeping]. www.kathimerini.gr (in Greek). Archived from the original on November 3, 2021. Retrieved November 2, 2021.
  19. ^ "Κακοκαιρία "Αθηνά": Ανάλυση εκτάκτου δελτίου επικίνδυνων καιρικών φαινομένων" [Bad weather "Athena": Analysis of emergency bulletin of dangerous weather phenomena]. www.emy.gr (in Greek). Archived from the original on November 3, 2021. Retrieved November 2, 2021.
  20. ^ "Κακοκαιρία Αθηνά: Ισχυροί άνεμοι στη βόρεια Ελλάδα – Δεμένα πλοία και πτώσεις δένδρων" [Bad weather Athena: Strong winds in northern Greece - Moored ships and tree falls]. www.kathimerini.gr (in Greek). Archived from the original on November 5, 2021. Retrieved November 2, 2021.
  21. ^ Newsroom. "Κακοκαιρία Αθηνά: Κατολισθήσεις στην Εύβοια – Πλημμύρισαν δρόμοι (βίντεο)" [Bad weather Athena: Landslides in Evia - Roads flooded (video)]. www.kathimerini.gr (in Greek). Archived from the original on November 3, 2021. Retrieved November 2, 2021.
  22. ^ "Β. Εύβοια: Έκτακτη επιχορήγηση 20 εκατ. ευρώ ανακοίνωσε ο Χρ. Τριαντόπουλος" [V. Evia: Extraordinary grant of 20 million euros announced by Chr. Triantopoulos]. www.kathimerini.gr (in Greek). Archived from the original on November 3, 2021. Retrieved November 2, 2021.
  23. ^ "Κακοκαιρία Αθηνά: Αγωνία για τους κατοίκους στη Βόρεια Εύβοια – Πού αναμένονται ισχυρά φαινόμενα (εικόνες – βίντεο)" [Bad weather Athena: Anxiety for the residents in North Evia - Where strong phenomena are expected (images - video)]. www.kathimerini.gr (in Greek). Archived from the original on November 5, 2021. Retrieved November 2, 2021.
  24. ^ a b Richard Davies. "Italy – Floods and Landslides in Liguria Region After 181mm of Rain in 1 Hour – FloodList". floodlist.com. Archived from the original on October 27, 2021. Retrieved November 3, 2021.
  25. ^ "I danni causati dalle forti piogge in Liguria" [Damage caused by heavy rains in Liguria]. www.ilpost.it (in Italian). 4 October 2021. Archived from the original on November 3, 2021. Retrieved November 3, 2021.
  26. ^ "A Catania ci sono stati danni a causa del maltempo, e secondo il comune ci sarebbero alcuni feriti" [In Catania there were damage due to bad weather, and according to the municipality there are some injured]. www.ilpost.it (in Italian). 5 October 2021. Archived from the original on November 3, 2021. Retrieved November 3, 2021.