This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed.Find sources: "Timeline of photography technology" – news · newspapers · books · scholar · JSTOR (March 2019) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

The following list comprises significant milestones in the development of photography technology.

Timeline

The oldest surviving camera photograph, by Nicéphore Niépce, 1826 or 1827[1]
The oldest surviving camera photograph, by Nicéphore Niépce, 1826 or 1827[1]
View of the Boulevard du Temple, first photograph including a person (on pavement at lower left), by Daguerre, 1838
View of the Boulevard du Temple, first photograph including a person (on pavement at lower left), by Daguerre, 1838
First durable color photograph, 1861
First durable color photograph, 1861
An 1877 photographic color print on paper by Louis Ducos du Hauron. The irregular edges of the superimposed cyan, red and yellow components can be seen.
An 1877 photographic color print on paper by Louis Ducos du Hauron. The irregular edges of the superimposed cyan, red and yellow components can be seen.
Muybridge used high-speed photography to make the first animated image sequences photographed in real-time (1878–1887)
Muybridge used high-speed photography to make the first animated image sequences photographed in real-time (1878–1887)

Prior to the 20th century

20th century onwards

Photograph scanned into a digital computer, 1957
Photograph scanned into a digital computer, 1957
Josef H. Neumann: Chemogram Gustav I (C)1974
Josef H. Neumann: Chemogram Gustav I (C)1974

See also

Notes

  1. ^ a b c "The First Photograph – Heliography". Archived from the original on 2009-10-06. Retrieved 2009-09-29. from Helmut Gernsheim's article, "The 150th Anniversary of Photography," History of Photography, Vol. I, No. 1, January 1977: ... In 1822, Niépce coated a glass plate ... The sunlight passing through ... This first permanent example ... was destroyed ... some years later.
  2. ^ Sala, Angelus (1614). Septem planetarum terrestrium spagirica recensio: qua perspicue declaratur ratio nominis hermetici, analogia metallorum cum microcosmo, eorum praeparatio vera & unica, proprietates, & usus medicinales (in Latin). Amsterodami: Apud Wilhelmum Ianssonium. OCLC 34709352.
  3. ^ Josef Maria Eder (1978), History of photographyPaperback, New York Dover Publications, p. 22-23, ISBN 978-0-486-23586-8
  4. ^ This date is misreported as 1725 or 1727, an error deriving from the belief that a 1727 publication of Schulze's account of experiments he says he undertook about two years earlier is the original source. In fact, it is a reprint of a 1719 publication and the date of the experiments is therefore circa 1717. The dated contents page of the true original can be seen here Archived 2015-02-21 at the Wayback Machine (retrieved 2015-02-21)
  5. ^ http://digital.library.upenn.edu/women/fulhame/combustion/combustion.html later publication in America
  6. ^ Niépce House Museum: History of Photography, part 1 Archived 2014-03-08 at the Wayback Machine. Retrieved 26 May 2013.
  7. ^ Niépce House Museum: History of Photography, part 3 Archived 2014-03-16 at the Wayback Machine. Retrieved 26 May 2013.
  8. ^ "Mary Somerville - Biography".
  9. ^ Boris Kossoy (2004). Hercule Florence: El descubrimiento de la fotografía en Brasil. Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia. ISBN 968-03-0020-X.
  10. ^ a b c "WHF Talbot: Biography" Archived 2011-07-21 at the Wayback Machine, a concise account by widely acknowledged and extensively published Talbot expert Larry J. Schaaf. Retrieved 10 September 2014.
  11. ^ https://www.christopherjames-studio.com/GumBichromate3rdEdBookOfAltPro.pdf[bare URL PDF]
  12. ^ Ronalds, B.F. (2016). Sir Francis Ronalds: Father of the Electric Telegraph. London: Imperial College Press. ISBN 978-1-78326-917-4.
  13. ^ Ronalds, B.F. (2016). "The Beginnings of Continuous Scientific Recording using Photography: Sir Francis Ronalds' Contribution". European Society for the History of Photography. Archived from the original on 13 June 2016. Retrieved 2 June 2016.
  14. ^ Focal encyclopedia of photography : digital imaging, theory and applications, history, and science. Peres, Michael R. (4th ed.). Amsterdam: Focal. 2007. ISBN 978-0-08-047784-8. OCLC 499055803.((cite book)): CS1 maint: others (link)
  15. ^ Hannavy, John (2013-12-16). Hannavy, John (ed.). Encyclopedia of Nineteenth-Century Photography. doi:10.4324/9780203941782. ISBN 9780203941782.
  16. ^ a b c d e f g Kodak Chronology of Motion Picture Films 1889 to 1939 Archived 2013-10-15 at the Wayback Machine. Retrieved 2 June 2013.
  17. ^ Kirsch, Russell A., "Earliest Image Processing", NISTS Museum; SEAC and the Start of Image Processing at the National Bureau of Standards, National Institute of Standards and Technology, archived from the original on 2014-07-19
  18. ^ "FX". Canon Camera Museum. Canon, Inc. Retrieved 19 October 2020.
  19. ^ "Peter J.W. Noble, inventor of the image sensor". www.pjwn.co.uk. Archived from the original on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 3 May 2018.
  20. ^ "Developers Look Back on the History of the EOS System – Part 1". Canon Camera Museum. Canon, Inc. Retrieved 19 October 2020.
  21. ^ "Photoshop: Born from Two Brothers". CrisherEntertainment.com. February 28, 2013. Archived from the original on July 1, 2016. Retrieved October 15, 2014.
  22. ^ "Adobe Photoshop 1.0 Feb. 1990 - 20 Years of Adobe Photoshop". Graphics Software. About.com. Retrieved August 13, 2013.
  23. ^ a b Cornell University Library (2003). "Digital Preservation and Technology Timeline". Digital Preservation Management. Archived from the original on 2015-08-06. Retrieved 10 July 2018.
  24. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2007-09-08. Retrieved 2011-12-04.((cite web)): CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  25. ^ Hsu, Tiffany (23 June 2009). "Kodachrome to be discontinued". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on 14 February 2020. Retrieved 19 October 2020. Eastman Kodak Co. is discontinuing the storied 74-year-old color film.
  26. ^ "FujiFilm camera". dpreview.com. dpreview. Archived from the original on 2015-09-09.