Bashaw
Town
Town of Bashaw
Motto(s): 
We want you here with us
Bashaw is located in Alberta
Bashaw
Bashaw
Location of Bashaw in Alberta
Coordinates: 52°35′0″N 112°58′17″W / 52.58333°N 112.97139°W / 52.58333; -112.97139Coordinates: 52°35′0″N 112°58′17″W / 52.58333°N 112.97139°W / 52.58333; -112.97139
CountryCanada
ProvinceAlberta
RegionCentral Alberta
Census division10
Municipal districtCamrose County
Incorporated[1] 
 • VillageAugust 18, 1911
 • TownMay 1, 1964
Government
 • MayorRobert McDonald
 • Governing bodyBashaw Town Council
 • MPKevin Sorenson (Crowfoot)
Area
 (2021)[3]
 • Land2.72 km2 (1.05 sq mi)
Elevation793 m (2,602 ft)
Population
 (2021)[3]
 • Total848
 • Density311.9/km2 (808/sq mi)
Time zoneUTC−7 (MST)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−6 (MDT)
Postal code span
HighwaysHighway 21
Highway 53
WaterwaysBuffalo Lake
Red Deer Lake
WebsiteOfficial website

Bashaw /ˈbæʃɔː/ is a town in central Alberta, Canada. It is at the junction of Highway 21 and Highway 53.

The community has the name of Eugene Bashaw, an original owner of the town site.[5]

Post office dates from 1910.[6]

Demographics

In the 2021 Census of Population conducted by Statistics Canada, the Town of Bashaw had a population of 848 living in 381 of its 415 total private dwellings, a change of 2.2% from its 2016 population of 830. With a land area of 2.72 km2 (1.05 sq mi), it had a population density of 311.8/km2 (807.5/sq mi) in 2021.[3]

In the 2016 Census of Population conducted by Statistics Canada, the Town of Bashaw recorded a population of 830 living in 379 of its 418 total private dwellings, a -4.9% change from its 2011 population of 873. With a land area of 2.99 km2 (1.15 sq mi), it had a population density of 277.6/km2 (719.0/sq mi) in 2016.[7]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Location and History Profile: Town of Bashaw" (PDF). Alberta Municipal Affairs. October 7, 2016. p. 22. Retrieved October 16, 2016.
  2. ^ "Municipal Officials Search". Alberta Municipal Affairs. May 9, 2019. Retrieved October 1, 2021.
  3. ^ a b c "Population and dwelling counts: Canada, provinces and territories, and census subdivisions (municipalities)". Statistics Canada. February 9, 2022. Retrieved February 9, 2022.
  4. ^ "Alberta Private Sewage Systems 2009 Standard of Practice Handbook: Appendix A.3 Alberta Design Data (A.3.A. Alberta Climate Design Data by Town)" (PDF) (PDF). Safety Codes Council. January 2012. pp. 212–215 (PDF pages 226–229). Archived from the original (PDF) on October 16, 2013. Retrieved October 8, 2013.
  5. ^ Place-names of Alberta. Ottawa: Geographic Board of Canada. 1928. p. 16.
  6. ^ Hamilton, William (1978). The Macmillan Book of Canadian Place Names. Toronto: Macmillan. p. 20. ISBN 0-7715-9754-1.
  7. ^ "Population and dwelling counts, for Canada, provinces and territories, and census subdivisions (municipalities), 2016 and 2011 censuses – 100% data (Alberta)". Statistics Canada. February 8, 2017. Retrieved February 8, 2017.