Chevy Chase Village, Maryland
Flag of Chevy Chase Village, Maryland
Coat of arms of Chevy Chase Village, Maryland
Official logo of Chevy Chase Village, Maryland
Location of Chevy Chase Village within Montgomery County, Maryland (click to enlarge)
Location of Chevy Chase Village within Montgomery County, Maryland (click to enlarge)
Coordinates: 38°58′10″N 77°4′44″W / 38.96944°N 77.07889°W / 38.96944; -77.07889
Country United States
State Maryland
CountyMontgomery
Incorporated1910[1]
Government
 • Village ManagerShana Davis-Cook
Area
 • Total0.42 sq mi (1.09 km2)
 • Land0.42 sq mi (1.09 km2)
 • Water0.00 sq mi (0.00 km2)
Elevation
341 ft (104 m)
Population
 • Total2,049
 • Density4,878.57/sq mi (1,885.46/km2)
Time zoneUTC-5 (EST)
 • Summer (DST)UTC-4 (EDT)
ZIP code
20815[4]
Area code301
FIPS code24-16787
GNIS feature ID1669429
Websitewww.chevychasevillagemd.gov

Chevy Chase Village is an incorporated municipality in Montgomery County, Maryland, United States, bordering Washington, D.C. It is made up of sections 1, 1a, and 2 of Chevy Chase, as originally designated by The Chevy Chase Land Company.[5] The population was 2,049 as of the 2020 census.[3] The town was the wealthiest in Maryland as of 2017, with a median income of over $250,000, the highest income bracket listed by the census bureau, and a median home value of $1,823,800.[6]

Chevy Chase Village includes 727 housing units.[7] It is known for its speed limit enforcement actions, which produce 24% of its annual revenue.[8]

The suburb was created to be all-white;[9] it remains overwhelmingly so more than a century later.[10]

Chevy Chase Village is the location of the Chevy Chase Club, a private country club with an initiation fee of over $50,000.[10]

History

See also: Chevy Chase, Maryland

Chevy Chase Village was created in 1890 as a streetcar suburb. In 1914, it became a special taxing area. It was incorporated in 1951.[11]

Geography

Chevy Chase Village is located along the southern edge of Montgomery County at 38°58′10″N 77°4′44″W / 38.96944°N 77.07889°W / 38.96944; -77.07889 (38.969560, -77.078967).[12] It is bordered to the southeast by the Chevy Chase neighborhood of Washington, D.C., to the southwest by Friendship Heights Village, to the west by Somerset, to the northwest by the Chevy Chase Club, to the north by the town of Chevy Chase Section Three, and to the northeast by Martin's Additions.

The town has total area of 0.42 square miles (1.09 km2), all land.[2] The town is in the Potomac River watershed, with the west part of the town draining to the Little Falls Branch, and the east part draining to a tributary of Rock Creek.

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.Note
19602,405
19702,265−5.8%
19802,118−6.5%
1990749−64.6%
20002,043172.8%
20101,953−4.4%
20202,0494.9%
U.S. Decennial Census[13]

2010 census

As of the census of 2010,[14] there were 1,953 people, 697 households, and 609 families living in the town. The population density was 4,650.0 inhabitants per square mile (1,795.4/km2). There were 726 housing units at an average density of 1,728.6 per square mile (667.4/km2). The racial makeup of the town was 95.9% White, 0.6% African American, 0.2% Native American, 1.6% Asian, 0.5% from other races, and 1.3% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.8% of the population.

There were 697 households, of which 36.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 82.2% were married couples living together, 3.9% had a female householder with no husband present, 1.3% had a male householder with no wife present, and 12.6% were non-families. 11.2% of all households were made up of individuals, and 7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.80 and the average family size was 2.99.

The median age in the town was 49.1 years. 26.4% of residents were under the age of 18; 3.6% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 13.5% were from 25 to 44; 36.3% were from 45 to 64; and 20% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the town was 48.5% male and 51.5% female.

2000 census

As of the census[14] of 2000, there were 2,043 people, 704 households, and 601 families living in the town. The population density was 4,943.6 inhabitants per square mile (1,908.7/km2). There were 718 housing units at an average density of 1,737.4 per square mile (670.8/km2). The racial makeup of the town was 95.64% White, 0.69% African American, 1.62% Asian, 0.59% from other races, and 1.47% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.71% of the population.

There were 704 households, out of which 43.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 79.5% were married couples living together, 4.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 14.5% were non-families. 12.5% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.90 and the average family size was 3.11 people per household.

In the town, the population was spread out, with 29.0% under the age of 18, 4.0% from 18 to 24, 14.5% from 25 to 44, 38.2% from 45 to 64, and 14.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 46 years. For every 100 females, there were 98.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.2 males.

The median income for a household in the town was in excess of $200,000, as is the median income for a family. Males had a median income of over $100,000 versus $76,067 for females. The per capita income for the town was $95,174. About 1.3% of families and 2.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.8% of those under age 18 and none of those age 65 or over.

Government

CCVPD car

The village is managed by a board of managers, which consists of seven elected officials.[15]

The village has its own police department.[15]

As of 2017, about 46% of the village's revenue came from income taxes, 20% from property taxes, and 24% from citations from speed limit enforcement along Connecticut Avenue, a commuter route that runs through the village.[8]

Transportation

MD 185 (Connecticut Avenue) southbound in Chevy Chase Village

Two state highways run through Chevy Chase Village: Maryland Route 185 (Connecticut Avenue), which extends north past Interstate 495 (the Capital Beltway) and south to Washington, D.C.; and Maryland Route 186 (Brookville Road), a minor local connector that parallels MD 185 to the east.

Education

Chevy Chase Village is served by the Montgomery County Public Schools system.

Residents are zoned to Rosemary Hills Elementary School (PreK-2) (Unincorporated Montgomery County) and Chevy Chase Elementary School (3-6) (in the town of Chevy Chase). Some residents are zoned to Somerset Elementary School (K-5) (in Somerset, Maryland.

All residents are zoned to Westland Middle School and Bethesda-Chevy Chase High School, located in unincorporated Montgomery County.

Notable people

Current residents

Former residents

See also

References

  1. ^ "Chevy Chase Village". Government of Maryland.
  2. ^ a b "2022 U.S. Gazetteer Files: Maryland". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 1, 2023.
  3. ^ a b "P1. Race – Chevy Chase Village town, Maryland: 2020 DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171)". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved June 1, 2023.
  4. ^ "Chevy Chase Village MD ZIP Code". zipdatamaps.com. 2023. Retrieved February 17, 2023.
  5. ^ "Village History - Chevy Chase Village Section 3". Archived from the original on March 4, 2016. Retrieved September 28, 2011.
  6. ^ Quinn, Morgan (June 14, 2017). "The wealthiest city in each US state". Business Insider.
  7. ^ "H1. Housing Units – Chevy Chase Village town, Maryland: 2020 DEC Demographic and Housing Characteristics (PL 94-171)". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved June 1, 2023.
  8. ^ a b "General Funds and SafeSpeed Budgets Proposed for Board Adoption on April 17, 2017". Chevy Chase Village.
  9. ^ French, Roderick S. (1973). "Chevy Chase Village in the Context of the National Suburban Movement, 1870-1900". Records of the Columbia Historical Society, Washington, D.C. 49: 300–329. ISSN 0897-9049.
  10. ^ a b c d e f g Neate, Rupert (December 4, 2015). "Chevy Chase, Maryland: the super-rich town that has it all – except diversity". The Guardian.
  11. ^ "About the Village". Chevy Chase Village.
  12. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. February 12, 2011.
  13. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2016.
  14. ^ a b "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 1, 2017.
  15. ^ a b "Village Government". Chevy Chase Village.
  16. ^ Lerner, Michele (June 10, 2010). "Luxury home: Brinkley's Chevy Chase estate impresses". The Washington Times.