Colusa County, California
County of Colusa
Colusa County Courthouse
Colusa County Courthouse
Official seal of Colusa County, California
Interactive map of Colusa County
Location in the state of California
Location in the state of California
CountryUnited States
StateCalifornia
RegionSacramento Valley
IncorporatedFebruary 18, 1850[1]
Named forRancho Colus
County seatColusa
Largest cityColusa (population)
Williams (area)
Government
 • TypeCouncil–CAO
 • Chair[2]Jose Merced Corona
 • Vice Chair[3]Kent S. Boes
 • Board of Supervisors[4]
Supervisors
  • Jose Merced Corona
  • Daurice Kalfsbeek Smith
  • Kent S. Boes
  • Gary J. Evans
  • Denise J. Carter
 • County Administrative OfficerWendy G. Tyler
Area
 • Total1,156 sq mi (2,990 km2)
 • Land1,151 sq mi (2,980 km2)
 • Water5.6 sq mi (15 km2)
Highest elevation7,059 ft (2,152 m)
Population
 (2020)
 • Total21,839
 • Density19/sq mi (7.3/km2)
Time zoneUTC-8 (Pacific Time Zone)
 • Summer (DST)UTC-7 (Pacific Daylight Time)
Area code530
Websitewww.countyofcolusa.org

Colusa County (/kəˈlsə/ (listen)) is a county located in the U.S. state of California. As of the 2020 census, the population was 21,839.[6] The county seat is Colusa.[7] It is in the North Valley of California, northwest of the state capital, Sacramento.

History

Colusa County is one of the original counties of California, created in 1850 at the time of statehood. Parts of the county's territory were given to Tehama County in 1856 and to Glenn County in 1891.[8]

The county was named after the 1844 Rancho Colus Mexican land grant to John Bidwell. The name of the county in the original state legislative act of 1850 was spelled Colusi, and often in newspapers was spelled Coluse.[9][10] The word is derived from the name of a Patwin village known as Ko'-roo or Korusi located on the west side of the Sacramento River on the site of the present-day city of Colusa.[11][12] The name was established as Colusa by 1855.[8]

Early history

Present-day Colusa County was originally home to the Patwin band of the Wintun people,[13] whose territory included areas along the Sacramento River as well as lands extending west towards Lake County, bounded in the north by the sources of Stony Creek near Stonyford and in the south by Putah Creek.[14]

Linguistically, the Patwin people in the Colusa area spoke two dialects of the Southern Wintuan language. River Patwin was spoken in villages along the Sacramento River, including at Korusi, site of the present city of Colusa. Hill Patwin was spoken in the plains and foothills to the west.[13]

European settlement

Present-day Colusa County was included as part of three Mexican land grants: John Bidwell's smaller 1845 Rancho Colus grant, which included the modern city of Colusa;[15] the larger 1844 Rancho Jimeno grant, which surrounded the Colus grant;[16][15] and the 1844 Larkin's Children grant, located upriver from Colusa near the present town of Princeton, California.[17][18]

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 1,156 square miles (2,990 km2), of which 1,151 square miles (2,980 km2) is land and 5.6 square miles (15 km2) (0.5%) is water.[19] A large number of streams drain the county, including Elk Creek, Salt Creek, Stony Creek and Bear Creek.

The county's eastern boundary is formed, in part, by the Sacramento River.

Adjacent counties

National protected areas

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1850115
18602,2741,877.4%
18706,165171.1%
188013,118112.8%
189014,64011.6%
19007,364−49.7%
19107,7325.0%
19209,29020.2%
193010,25810.4%
19409,788−4.6%
195011,65119.0%
196012,0753.6%
197012,4302.9%
198012,7912.9%
199016,27527.2%
200018,80415.5%
201021,41913.9%
202021,8392.0%
U.S. Decennial Census[20]
1790–1960[21] 1900–1990[22]
1990–2000[23] 2010[24] 2020[25]

2020 census

Colusa County, California - Demographic Profile
(NH = Non-Hispanic)
Race / Ethnicity Pop 2010[24] Pop 2020[25] % 2010 % 2020
White alone (NH) 8,524 6,941 39.80% 31.78%
Black or African American alone (NH) 168 182 0.78% 0.83%
Native American or Alaska Native alone (NH) 296 280 1.38% 1.28%
Asian alone (NH) 267 252 1.25% 1.15%
Pacific Islander alone (NH) 59 70 0.28% 0.32%
Some Other Race alone (NH) 29 92 0.14% 0.42%
Mixed Race/Multi-Racial (NH) 272 546 1.27% 2.50%
Hispanic or Latino (any race) 11,804 13,476 55.11% 61.71%
Total 21,419 21,839 100.00% 100.00%

Note: the US Census treats Hispanic/Latino as an ethnic category. This table excludes Latinos from the racial categories and assigns them to a separate category. Hispanics/Latinos can be of any race.

2011

Places by population, race, and income

2010

The 2010 United States Census reported that Colusa County had a population of 21,419. The racial makeup of Colusa County was 13,854 (64.7%) White, 195 (0.9%) African American, 419 (2.0%) Native American, 281 (1.3%) Asian, 68 (0.3%) Pacific Islander, 5,838 (27.3%) from other races, and 764 (3.6%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 11,804 persons (55.1%).[33]

2000

As of the census[34] of 2000, there were 18,804 people, 6,097 households, and 4,578 families residing in the county. The population density was 16 people per square mile (6/km2). There were 6,774 housing units at an average density of 6 per square mile (2/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 64.3% White, 0.6% Black or African American, 2.3% Native American, 1.2% Asian, 0.4% Pacific Islander, 26.7% from other races, and 4.5% from two or more races. 46.5% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 8.5% were of German, 5.6% English, 5.5% American and 5.4% Irish ancestry according to Census 2000. 58.7% spoke English and 40.4% Spanish as their first language.

There were 6,097 households, out of which 41.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.6% were married couples living together, 9.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 24.9% were non-families. 21.5% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.01 and the average family size was 3.51.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 31.6% under the age of 18, 10.3% from 18 to 24, 26.9% from 25 to 44, 19.8% from 45 to 64, and 11.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 32 years. For every 100 females there were 103.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 103.8 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $35,062, and the median income for a family was $40,138. Males had a median income of $32,210 versus $21,521 for females. The per capita income for the county was $14,730. About 13.0% of families and 16.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 19.5% of those under age 18 and 8.2% of those age 65 or over.

Politics

Voter registration statistics

Cities by population and voter registration

Overview

In its early history Colusa was one of the most reliable Democratic counties in California. Along with Mariposa County, it was one of only two counties in the Pacific States to support Alton B. Parker in 1904.[36] From 1880 until 1952, Colusa only went Republican during the GOP landslides of the Roaring Twenties. Since 1952, however, Colusa has become a strongly Republican county in Presidential and congressional elections, with Lyndon Johnson, in 1964, being the last Democrat to win the county.

United States presidential election results for Colusa County, California
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 4,559 57.27% 3,239 40.69% 163 2.05%
2016 3,551 53.02% 2,661 39.73% 485 7.24%
2012 3,601 59.57% 2,314 38.28% 130 2.15%
2008 3,733 57.89% 2,569 39.84% 146 2.26%
2004 4,142 67.17% 1,947 31.58% 77 1.25%
2000 3,629 64.92% 1,745 31.22% 216 3.86%
1996 3,047 54.29% 2,054 36.60% 511 9.11%
1992 2,589 45.94% 1,798 31.91% 1,248 22.15%
1988 3,077 59.49% 2,022 39.10% 73 1.41%
1984 3,388 65.30% 1,725 33.25% 75 1.45%
1980 2,897 58.00% 1,605 32.13% 493 9.87%
1976 2,733 52.74% 2,340 45.16% 109 2.10%
1972 2,715 57.56% 1,810 38.37% 192 4.07%
1968 2,361 51.58% 1,858 40.59% 358 7.82%
1964 1,811 39.32% 2,790 60.57% 5 0.11%
1960 2,497 51.37% 2,348 48.30% 16 0.33%
1956 2,474 53.23% 2,171 46.71% 3 0.06%
1952 2,824 59.81% 1,881 39.83% 17 0.36%
1948 1,803 46.22% 2,020 51.78% 78 2.00%
1944 1,579 42.92% 2,090 56.81% 10 0.27%
1940 1,774 39.74% 2,655 59.48% 35 0.78%
1936 1,186 28.15% 2,965 70.38% 62 1.47%
1932 1,095 27.50% 2,752 69.11% 135 3.39%
1928 1,752 56.30% 1,338 42.99% 22 0.71%
1924 1,127 43.84% 495 19.25% 949 36.91%
1920 1,645 61.24% 907 33.77% 134 4.99%
1916 1,011 31.82% 1,998 62.89% 168 5.29%
1912 3 0.11% 1,760 63.58% 1,005 36.31%
1908 730 38.58% 1,064 56.24% 98 5.18%
1904 885 46.78% 900 47.57% 107 5.66%
1900 648 35.98% 1,075 59.69% 78 4.33%
1896 581 30.86% 1,250 66.38% 52 2.76%
1892 645 31.08% 1,187 57.20% 243 11.71%


Colusa County is in California's 3rd congressional district, represented by Democrat John Garamendi.[37]

In the State Assembly, Colusa County is split between the 3rd and 4th districts, represented by Republican James Gallagher and Democrat Cecilia Aguiar-Curry, respectively.[38] In the State Senate, the county is in the 4th Senate District, represented by Republican Jim Nielsen.[39]

On November 4, 2008, Colusa County voted 71.6% for Proposition 8 which amended the California Constitution to ban same-sex marriages.

Crime

The following table includes the number of incidents reported and the rate per 1,000 persons for each type of offense.

Cities by population and crime rates

Transportation

Major highways

Public transportation

Colusa County Transit runs buses from Colusa to Williams, Arbuckle, Grimes and College City, with limited service to Maxwell.

Airports

Colusa County Airport is a general-aviation airport located near the city of Colusa.

Communities

Cities

Census-designated places

Unincorporated community

Population ranking

The population ranking of the following table is based on the 2010 census of Colusa County.[42]

county seat

Rank City/Town/etc. Municipal type Population (2010 Census)
1 Colusa City 5,971
2 Williams City 5,123
3 Arbuckle CDP 3,028
4 Maxwell CDP 1,103
5 Grimes CDP 391
6 Princeton CDP 303
7 College City CDP 290
8 Lodoga CDP 197
9 Stonyford CDP 149
10 Colusa Rancheria[43] AIAN 76
11 Cortina Rancheria[44] AIAN 21

California Historical Landmarks

California Historical Landmarks in Colusa County:

Letts Lake
Letts Lake
Granville Perry Swift
Granville Perry Swift

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Other = Some other race + Two or more races
  2. ^ Native American = Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander + American Indian or Alaska Native
  3. ^ a b Percentage of registered voters with respect to total population. Percentages of party members with respect to registered voters follow.
  4. ^ Only larceny-theft cases involving property over $400 in value are reported as property crimes.

References

  1. ^ "Chronology". California State Association of Counties. Retrieved February 6, 2015.
  2. ^ "District 1 | Colusa County, CA - Official Website".
  3. ^ "District 3 | Colusa County, CA - Official Website".
  4. ^ "Member & District Information | Colusa County, CA - Official Website".
  5. ^ "Snow Mountain". Peakbagger.com. Retrieved May 13, 2015.
  6. ^ "Colusa County, California". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  7. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  8. ^ a b "The Creation of Our 58 Counties". California State Association of Counties. Retrieved March 3, 2019.
  9. ^ The Statutes of California Passed at the First Session of the Legislature (PDF). San Jose: J. Winchester, State Printer. 1850. p. 62.
  10. ^ "How Did Our 58 Counties Get Their Names?". California State Association of Counties. Retrieved March 3, 2019.
  11. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office. pp. 88.
  12. ^ Heizer, Robert; Hester, Thomas (1970). "Names and Locations of Some Ethnographic Patwin and Maidu Indian Villages" (PDF). Contributions of the University of California Archaeological Research Facility. 9: 84.
  13. ^ a b Golla, Victor (2011). California Indian Languages. Berkeley: University of California Press. pp. 143. ISBN 978-0520266674.
  14. ^ Cook, Sherburne Friend (1976). The population of the California Indians, 1769-1970. Berkeley: University of California Press. p. 13.
  15. ^ a b Hoffman, Ogden (1862). Reports of Land Cases Determined in the United States District Court for the Northern District of California. San Francisco: Numa Hubert. pp. 37, 41.
  16. ^ Plat of the Colus Rancho. San Francisco: U.S. Surveyor General's Office. 1860.
  17. ^ Hague, Harlan (1995). Thomas O. Larkin: A Life of Patriotism and Profit in Old California. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press. p. 182. ISBN 0806127333.
  18. ^ Grants of Land in California Made by Spanish or Mexican Authorities (PDF). Sacramento: California State Lands Commission. 1982. pp. 25–26.
  19. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved September 24, 2015.
  20. ^ "Census of Population and Housing from 1790-2000". US Census Bureau. Retrieved January 24, 2022.
  21. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved September 24, 2015.
  22. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved September 24, 2015.
  23. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved September 24, 2015.
  24. ^ a b "P2 HISPANIC OR LATINO, AND NOT HISPANIC OR LATINO BY RACE - 2010: DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171) - Colusa County, California". United States Census Bureau.
  25. ^ a b "P2 HISPANIC OR LATINO, AND NOT HISPANIC OR LATINO BY RACE - 2020: DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171) - Colusa County, California". United States Census Bureau.
  26. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B02001. U.S. Census website . Retrieved 2013-10-26.
  27. ^ a b U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B03003. U.S. Census website . Retrieved 2013-10-26.
  28. ^ a b U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B19301. U.S. Census website . Retrieved 2013-10-21.
  29. ^ a b U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B19013. U.S. Census website . Retrieved 2013-10-21.
  30. ^ a b U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B19113. U.S. Census website . Retrieved 2013-10-21.
  31. ^ a b U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates. U.S. Census website . Retrieved 2013-10-21.
  32. ^ U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B01003. U.S. Census website . Retrieved 2013-10-21.
  33. ^ "2010 Census P.L. 94-171 Summary File Data". United States Census Bureau.
  34. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  35. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q California Secretary of State. February 10, 2013 - Report of Registration Archived November 3, 2013, at the Wayback Machine. Retrieved 2013-10-31.
  36. ^ Menendez, Albert J.; The Geography of Presidential Elections in the United States, 1868-2004, pp. 153-155 ISBN 0786422173
  37. ^ "California's 3rd Congressional District - Representatives & District Map". Civic Impulse, LLC. Retrieved March 1, 2013.
  38. ^ "Members Assembly". State of California. Retrieved March 21, 2013.
  39. ^ "Senators". State of California. Retrieved March 21, 2013.
  40. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Office of the Attorney General, Department of Justice, State of California. Table 11: Crimes – 2009 Archived December 2, 2013, at the Wayback Machine. Retrieved 2013-11-14.
  41. ^ a b c United States Department of Justice, Federal Bureau of Investigation. Crime in the United States, 2012, Table 8 (California). Retrieved 2013-11-14.
  42. ^ "2010 U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved December 29, 2015.
  43. ^ Staff, Website Services & Coordination. "2010 Census Interactive Population Map (Text Version) - U.S. Census Bureau". www.census.gov.
  44. ^ Staff, Website Services & Coordination. "2010 Census Interactive Population Map (Text Version) - U.S. Census Bureau". www.census.gov.
  45. ^ Colusa County Courthouse
  46. ^ Letts Valley
  47. ^ Swift's Stone Corral

Coordinates: 39°11′N 122°14′W / 39.18°N 122.24°W / 39.18; -122.24