The Devanagari numerals are the symbols used to write numbers in the Devanagari script, the predominant for northern Indian languages. They are used to write decimal numbers, instead of the Western Arabic numerals.

Table

Modern
Devanagari
Western
Arabic
Words for the cardinal number
Sanskrit
(wordstem)
Hindi Marathi Nepali
0 śūnya (शून्य) शून्य (śūny) शून्य (śūnya) शून्य (śūnya)
1 eka (एकः) एक (ek) एक (ek) एक (ek)
2 dvi (द्वि) दो (do) दोन (don) दुइ (dui)
3 tri (त्रिणि) तीन (tīn) तीन (tīn) तिन (tīn)
4 catur (चत्वारी) चार (cār) चार (cār) चारि (cāri)
5 pañca (पञ्च) पाँच (pāñc) पाच (pāch) पाँच (pānch)
6 ṣaṭ (षट्) छह (chah) सहा (sahā) छअ (chaā)
7 sapta (सप्त) सात (sāt) सात (sāt) सात (sāt)
8 aṣṭa (अष्ट) आठ (āṭh) आठ (āṭh) आठ (āṭha)
9 nava (नव) नौ (nau) नऊ (naū) नअ ()

The word śūnya for zero was calqued into Arabic as صفر sifr, meaning 'nothing', which became the term "zero" in many European languages via Medieval Latin zephirum.[1]

Variants

This section needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources in this section. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed.Find sources: "Devanagari numerals" – news · newspapers · books · scholar · JSTOR (September 2017) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)
A comparison of Sanskrit and Eastern Arabic numerals

Devanagari digits shapes may vary depending on geographical area or epoch. Some of the variants are also seen in older Sanskrit literature.[2][3]


Common

Nepali
1

"Bombay" Variant

"Calcutta" Variant
5

"Bombay" Variant

"Calcutta" Variant
8

Common

Nepali Variant
9

See also

References

Notes
  1. ^ "zero - Origin and meaning of zero by Online Etymology Dictionary". www.etymonline.com.
  2. ^ Devanagari for TEX version 2.17, page 22
  3. ^ "Alternate digits in Devanagari". Scriptsource.org. Retrieved 13 September 2017.
Sources