EduQuest
Formerly
  • IBM Educational Systems (1982–1992)
  • IBM EduQuest (1992–1994)
Company typeDivision
FoundedJanuary 1992; 32 years ago (1992-01) in Atlanta, Georgia
FounderJames Elton Dezell Jr.
Defunct1995; 29 years ago (1995)
FateRestructured
SuccessorIBM K–12 Education
Products
  • Computer systems
  • Software
ParentInternational Business Machines Corporation (IBM)

IBM EduQuest, later shortened to EduQuest, was a subsidiary of American multinational technology corporation IBM that catered to the elementary and secondary educational market. A spin-off of the company's Educational Systems division spearheaded by James Elton Dezell Jr. (1933–2000), EduQuest developed software and hardware for schools. Most prominent was their line of all-in-one personal computers, whose form factor was based on IBM's PS/2 Model 25.

History

The roots of EduQuest began with a division within IBM called Educational Systems,[1][2] formed in 1982 by James Elton Dezell Jr. (1933–2000), an IBM executive and former teacher.[3][4][2] IBM spun it off as EduQuest in 1992 and named Dezell as president. Its initial personnel comprised 1,000 sales and support employees, including 400 at its headquarters in Atlanta, Georgia.[1] From 1992 to 1994, EduQuest operated independently of IBM,[5] the latter describing EduQuest as a "company within a company" in promotional material.[6] IBM reserved their role as a holding company, renting real estate and equipment to EduQuest.[5] In January 1994, EduQuest was consolidated with IBM's two other educational divisions, Academic Information Systems (or ACIS; geared toward higher education) and Skill Dynamics (computer and management training products used within IBM and marketed to other corporations). The post-consolidation subsidiary was named IBM Education Businesses, with the three divisions including EduQuest still operating in their original capacities.[7] EduQuest retained close ties with the IBM Personal Computer Company, another spin-off of IBM formed in August 1992 that assumed responsibility of developing and selling IBM's desktop and mobile computers, such as the ThinkPad and PS/ValuePoint.[8]

Front view of an EduQuest Model Thirty with CD-ROM drive

EduQuest sold both hardware and software to schools. The subsidiary directly competed with Apple Computer, who had long cornered the educational computer market.[9] Most of EduQuest's software was interactive multimedia material and edutainment games co-developed by other software developers, such as Alternate Solutions.[10]

EduQuest's first computer system was the PS/2 Model 25 SX, an update to the Model 25 all-in-one offering within IBM's PS/2 line of personal computers that upgraded the processor to an i386SX.[11] The PS/2 Model 25 SX was developed shortly before the formation of EduQuest, in IBM's Boca Raton facility, led by José García.[12] EduQuest's later computer systems were still based on the Model 25 form factor but broke away from the PS/2 branding. In 1993, they introduced the Model Thirty, Model Forty, and Model Fifty. School district technology departments could order these models with adjustments to the hardware such as the networking capability (token ring, Ethernet or none at all); the amount of RAM; the presence of sound card; the size of the hard disk drive; and whether to install the optional CD-ROM drive. EduQuest developed the systems to withstand the rigors of elementary and secondary school use through physically attaching the mouse to the system chassis and making the mouse unable to be tampered with to remove the roller ball; covering the floppy drive with a dust shield to prevent chalk dust and dirt from gumming up the internals; and a special optional keyboard with a built-in trackball.[13] In May 1994, EduQuest introduced the Model Thirty-five and Model Fifty-Five, featuring upgraded processors.[14] The Easton Area School District purchased 1,418 of these Models in November 1994.[15]

EduQuest effectively went defunct in 1995 when it changed its name to IBM K–12 Education, moved its headquarters to Phoenix, Arizona, and stopped selling hardware.[2][16] It continued selling software targeted at students, teachers, and district administration.[2]

Computers

EduQuest computers
Name IBM P/N Processor Clock speed
(MHz)
Bus L2 cache
(KB)
No. of
slots
No. of
drive bays
FDD HDD Stock
memory
Monitor Form factor Date introduced Notes Ref(s).
25 SX 8525-K00 Intel 80386SX 20 ISA, 16-bit 0 3 2 one 1.44 MB 1 MB 12-in. color All-in-one April 1992 [12][17]
25 SX 8525-K01 Intel 80386SX 20 ISA, 16-bit 0 3 2 one 1.44 MB 1 MB 12-in. color All-in-one April 1992 Ethernet [12][17]
25 SX 8525-L02 Intel 80386SX 20 ISA, 16-bit 0 3 2 one 1.44 MB 1 MB 12-in. color All-in-one April 1992 Token Ring [12][17]
EduQuest Thirty 9603 IBM 386SLC 25 ISA, 16-bit 0 4 2 one 1.44 MB 30 MB 1–4 MB 14-in. color All-in-one March 1993 Model 25 adapted specifically for educational institutions, optional sound card, late models without IBM logo on badge [18][19][20]
EduQuest Forty 9604 Intel 80486SX 25 ISA, 16-bit 0 4 2 one 1.44 MB 30 MB 4 MB 14-in. color All-in-one March 1993 Model 25 adapted specifically for educational institutions, optional sound card, late models without IBM logo on badge [18][19][20]
EduQuest Fifty 9605 Intel 80486SX 25 ISA, 16-bit 0 4 2 one 1.44 MB 30 MB 4 MB 14-in. color All-in-one March 1993 Model 25 adapted specifically for educational institutions, optional sound card, late models without IBM logo on badge [18][19][20]
EduQuest Thirty-cs 9606 Cyrix Cx486SLC2 25/50 ISA, 16-bit 0 4 2 one 1.44 MB ? ? 14-in. color All-in-one 1994 Model 25 adapted specifically for educational institutions, optional sound card [21][22][20]
EduQuest Fifty-cs 9608 Intel 80486DX2 33 ISA, 16-bit 0 4 2 one 1.44 MB ? ? 14-in. color All-in-one 1994 Model 25 adapted specifically for educational institutions, optional sound card [21][22][20]
EduQuest Thirty-five 9613 Cyrix Cx486SLC2 25/50 ISA, 16-bit 0 4 2 one 1.44 MB 133 MB/256 MB/342 MB 4 MB 14-in. color All-in-one September 1994 Model 25 adapted specifically for educational institutions, optional sound card, late models without IBM logo on badge [23][20]
EduQuest Fifty-five 9615 Intel 80486 33–100 ISA, 16-bit 0 4 2 one 1.44 MB 170 MB/360 MB/540 MB 4 MB 14-in. color All-in-one September 1994 Model 25 adapted specifically for educational institutions, optional sound card, six processor options offered [23][20]
EduQuest Forty-five 9614 Intel 80486DX2 50 or 66 ISA, 16-bit 0 4 2 one 1.44 MB ? 4 MB 14-in. color All-in-one September 1995 Model 25 adapted specifically for educational institutions, optional sound card [24][20]

Timeline

Timeline of the IBM Personal Computer
IBM ThinkCentreIBM NetVistaIBM Palm Top PC 110IBM PC SeriesIBM AptivaIBM PS/ValuePointThinkPadEduQuestIBM PS/noteAmbra Computer CorporationIBM PCradioIBM PS/1IBM Industrial SystemIBM PS/55IBM PS/2IBM Personal Computer XT 286IBM PC ConvertibleIBM JXIBM Personal Computer AT/370IBM Personal Computer ATIBM Industrial ComputerIBM PCjrIBM Portable Personal ComputerIBM Personal Computer XT/370IBM 3270 PCIBM Personal Computer XTIBM 5550IBM Personal ComputerIBM System/23 DatamasterIBM 5120IBM 5110IBM 5100
Asterisk (*) denotes a model released in Japan only

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Staff writer (January 23, 1992). "International Business Machines: Computer Concern Realigns Schools Marketing Division". The Wall Street Journal. Dow Jones & Company. p. B6 – via ProQuest.
  2. ^ a b c d "About IBM K–12 Education". International Business Machines Corporation. November 4, 1996. Archived from the original on November 15, 1996.
  3. ^ Davis, Stephania H. (January 9, 2000). "Obituaries: James Dezell, 66, Was Founder of IBM Division". The Atlanta Journal and Constitution. CMG Corporate Services. p. C10 – via ProQuest.
  4. ^ Donner, JoAnne (March 1992). "Education: 'Our No. 1 Priority'". Business Atlanta. Argus Business. 21 (3): 20 – via ProQuest.
  5. ^ a b Li-Ron, Yael (May 19, 1992). "IBM Making Strange Choices". Jerusalem Post: 10 – via ProQuest.
  6. ^ West, Peter (February 5, 1992). "I.B.M. Launches EduQuest To Better Serve K-12 Market". EducationWeek. Editorial Projects in Education. Archived from the original on October 10, 2022.
  7. ^ Staff writer (January 4, 1994). "International Business Machines: Consolidation Set for Units That Sell to Schools, Firms". The Wall Street Journal. Dow Jones & Company: C20 – via ProQuest.
  8. ^ Staff writer (July 30, 1994). "IBM to close its Ambra mail-order PC business 1,500 to 2,000 jobs will be cut, workers informed by memo". Toronto Star. Reuters: B2 – via ProQuest.
  9. ^ McCartney, Scott (August 18, 1994). "Personal-Computer Makers Challenge Apple's Long Reign as Teacher's Pet". The Wall Street Journal. Dow Jones & Company: B1 – via ProQuest.
  10. ^ Klick, Kristen (February 22, 1995). "Parents Sample High-Tech Teaching". Morning Call: B4 – via ProQuest.
  11. ^ Staff writer (January 24, 1992). "IBM forms schools company in US: PS/2 model 25 SX is first product". Computergram International. GlobalData. 1843 – via Gale.
  12. ^ a b c d Lunan, Charles (January 1992). "IBM Goes After School Computer Market". Sun Sentinel. Tribune Publishing Company. p. D3 – via ProQuest. On Tuesday, IBM released the first product developed by [Jose] Garcia's team: the Model 25 SX. The new model uses the same Intel 386SX microprocessor ... to run the graphics-rich software popular with teachers. It will be able to display up to 256 different colors and come standard with connections for overhead projection systems and computer networks. IBM said the new models would become available in April at $1,249 to $1,899.
  13. ^ Greaves, Tom (March 1993). "EduQuest aims high: building the ideal computer for schools". Electronic Learning. Scholastic. 12 (6): 26 – via Gale.
  14. ^ Staff writer (May 19, 1994). "IBM aims two new multimedia personal computers at schools". Vancouver Sun: C13 – via ProQuest.
  15. ^ Klick, Kristen (November 15, 1994). "Easton Schools Merging onto Superhighway". Morning Call: B1 – via ProQuest.
  16. ^ Ginn, Silver Burdett (1996). DiscoveryWorks Professional Handbook. Houghton Mifflin. p. 66. ISBN 0-382-33550-3.
  17. ^ a b c Walsh, William (June 15, 2005). "IBM PS/2 Model 25SX". Walsh Computer Technology. Retrieved September 29, 2021.
  18. ^ a b c Greaves, Tom (March 1993). "EduQuest aims high: building the ideal computer for schools". Electronic Learning. Scholastic Inc. 12 (6): 26 – via Gale OneFile.
  19. ^ a b c Staff writer (March 1993). "EduQuest announces new line of computers for K-12". Electronic Learning. Scholastic Inc. 12 (6): 25 – via Gale OneFile.
  20. ^ a b c d e f g h "9655001 – IBM EduQuest 14-inch Monitor". DirectMacro. Archived from the original on September 30, 2021. Retrieved September 30, 2021.
  21. ^ a b "Title unknown". THE Journal. Technological Horizons in Education. 1994 – via Google Books.
  22. ^ a b "IBM EduQuest". Ardent Tool. Retrieved September 29, 2021.
  23. ^ a b Shields, Jean (September 1994). "Back-to-school computers". Technology & Learning. Future US. 15 (1): 66 – via Gale OneFile.
  24. ^ Staff writer (September 1995). "What's new on the hardware front". Technology & Learning. Future US. 16 (1): 64 – via Gale OneFile.