The General Roman Calendar of 1960 is the General Roman Calendar as approved on 25 July 1960 by Pope John XXIII's motu proprio Rubricarum instructum and promulgated by the Sacred Congregation of Rites the following day, 26 July 1960, by the decree Novum rubricarum. This 1960 calendar was incorporated into the 1962 edition of the Roman Missal.

This calendar is distinct from the General Roman Calendar of 1954 in that it also incorporates the changes made by Pope Pius XII in 1955, which included the reduction of octaves to three only, those of Christmas, Easter and Pentecost. See General Roman Calendar of Pope Pius XII.

Post-1960 developments

Further information: Preconciliar rites after the Second Vatican Council

Current use

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Changes

Masses for certain places

The 1962 typical edition of the Roman Missal—the edition incorporating the changes made for the 1960 General Calendar—collected many (though not all) Mass propers for feasts approved for celebration in certain places in a supplement placed at the end of the Missal; this supplement also incorporated changes mandated by Pope John XXIII regarding the suppression of some local feasts in his 14 February 1961 instruction De calendariis particularibus. In 2016, masses listed in this supplement could be said anywhere on days of the IV class.[1]

Cum sanctissima, 2020

On 25 March 2020, the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith made public the decree Cum sanctissima, dated 22 February 2020, which introduced a number of changes to the 1961 breviary and 1962 missal.[2][3]

See also

Notes

References

  1. ^ Sancta Missa Ordo for use with the 1962 Missale Romanum. Chicago: Biretta Books. 2016. p. 9.
  2. ^ "Decreto Cum sanctissima della Congregazione per la Dottrina della Fede circa la celebrazione liturgica in onore dei santi nella forma extraordinaria del Rito Romano". press.vatican.va. Retrieved 2022-09-06.
  3. ^ DiPippo, Gregory (March 25, 2020). "New Prefaces and Feasts for the EF Missal". New Liturgical Movement.