Georgian Braille
Georgian Braille chart.jpg
Script type
alphabet
Print basis
Georgian alphabet
LanguagesGeorgian
Related scripts
Parent systems
Braille
  • Georgian Braille

Georgian Braille is a braille alphabet used for writing the Georgian language. The assignments of the Georgian alphabet to braille patterns is largely consistent with unified international braille.[1]

Alphabet

⠁ (braille pattern dots-1)


a
⠃ (braille pattern dots-12)


b
⠛ (braille pattern dots-1245)


g
⠙ (braille pattern dots-145)


d
⠑ (braille pattern dots-15)


e
⠺ (braille pattern dots-2456)


v
⠵ (braille pattern dots-1356)


z
⠋ (braille pattern dots-124)


t’
⠊ (braille pattern dots-24)


i
⠅ (braille pattern dots-13)


k
⠇ (braille pattern dots-123)


l
⠍ (braille pattern dots-134)


m
⠝ (braille pattern dots-1345)


n
⠕ (braille pattern dots-135)


o
⠏ (braille pattern dots-1234)


p
⠚ (braille pattern dots-245)


zh
⠗ (braille pattern dots-1235)


r
⠎ (braille pattern dots-234)


s
⠞ (braille pattern dots-2345)


t
⠥ (braille pattern dots-136)


u
⠧ (braille pattern dots-1236)


p’
⠻ (braille pattern dots-12456)


k’
⠫ (braille pattern dots-1246)


gh
⠮ (braille pattern dots-2346)


q
⠱ (braille pattern dots-156)


sh
⠟ (braille pattern dots-12345)


ch’
⠉ (braille pattern dots-14)


ts’
⠽ (braille pattern dots-13456)


dz
⠹ (braille pattern dots-1456)


ts
⠭ (braille pattern dots-1346)


ch
⠓ (braille pattern dots-125)


kh
⠪ (braille pattern dots-246)


dj
⠯ (braille pattern dots-12346)


h

The basic braille range mostly conforms with international norms, with the exception of sounds which do not occur in Georgian, such as *f (reassigned in Georgian to თ t’), and *q, which is used for ჩ ch’ rather than ყ q. The assignment of to ჩ ch’ is reminiscent of Russian Braille, as is one or two other letters ( for შ sh is widespread in Eastern Europe), but most of the extended-letter assignments are unique to Georgian.

Punctuation

This section is based on a single source which has proven to be unreliable. It needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations other than UNESCO (1990, 2013). Relevant discussion may be found on the talk page. Please help improve this article by introducing citations to additional sources.Find sources: "Georgian Braille" – news · newspapers · books · scholar · JSTOR (October 2013)
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Braille
⠂ (braille pattern dots-2)
⠲ (braille pattern dots-256)
⠦ (braille pattern dots-236)
⠖ (braille pattern dots-235)
⠆ (braille pattern dots-23)
⠒ (braille pattern dots-25)
⠌ (braille pattern dots-34)
⠌ (braille pattern dots-34)
⠦ (braille pattern dots-236)
⠀ (braille pattern blank)
⠴ (braille pattern dots-356)
⠐ (braille pattern dots-5)
⠣ (braille pattern dots-126)
⠀ (braille pattern blank)
⠐ (braille pattern dots-5)
⠜ (braille pattern dots-345)

^* ჻ is an old word divider, no longer in use.[2]

References

  1. ^ UNESCO (2013) World Braille Usage, 3rd edition.
  2. ^ Unicode code point U+10FB. The Unicode name is misleadingly 'paragraph separator'.