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Impartiality (also called evenhandedness or fair-mindedness) is a principle of justice holding that decisions should be based on objective criteria, rather than on the basis of bias, prejudice, or preferring the benefit to one person over another for improper reasons.

Legal concept

European Union law refers in the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union to:

Every person has the right to have his or her affairs handled impartially, fairly and within a reasonable time by the institutions, bodies, offices and agencies of the Union (Article 41)
Everyone is entitled to a fair and public hearing within a reasonable time by an independent and impartial tribunal previously established by law (Article 47).[1]

Religious concepts

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Buddhism

Impartiality is one of the seven factors conducive to spiritual enlightenment in Buddhism.[citation needed]

Christianity

Hinduism

Islam

Judaism

See also

References

  1. ^ European Parliament, Council and Commission, Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union, 26 October 2012

Further reading