James H. Morrison
Jim Morrison fsa8a25862.jpg
Jimmy Morrison in 1939
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Louisiana's 6th district
In office
January 3, 1943 – January 3, 1967
Preceded byJared Y. Sanders Jr.
Succeeded byJohn Rarick
Personal details
Born
James Hobson Morrison

(1908-12-08)December 8, 1908
Hammond, Louisiana
DiedJuly 20, 2000(2000-07-20) (aged 91)
Hammond, Louisiana
Resting placeEpiscopal Church Cemetery in Hammond, Louisiana
Political partyDemocratic
Spouse(s)Marjorie Abbey Morrison (married 1940–2000, his death)
ChildrenJames Hobson Morrison, Jr.
Benjamin Abbey Morrison
Residence(s)Hammond, Louisiana
Loranger
Tangipahopa Parish
Alma materTulane University School of Law
OccupationAttorney

James Hobson Morrison (December 8, 1908 - July 20, 2000) was an American lawyer and politician who served twelve terms as a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives from Louisiana from 1943 to 1967.[1]

Early life and career

James H. Morrison was born in Hammond, Louisiana on December 8, 1908. He attended the public schools[2] and graduated from the Tulane University School of Law in New Orleans in 1934.[3] He passed the bar and began a private legal practice in Hammond. He supported better treatment for strawberry pickers and founded a labor newspaper.[4]

He ran unsuccessfully for governor in 1939 and again in 1944.[5]

Tenure in Congress

In 1942, he ran as a Democrat for a seat in the U.S. House, seeking to represent Louisiana's 6th congressional district. He won election and would serve in Congress for the next 24 years.[6][7]

He was initially assigned to serve on five committees, but after only a few days he stepped down from those committees because they dealt with issues less directly impactful to his district than the agricultural concerns he sought to represent.[8] He quickly gained a reputation as a populist and supporter of federal highway funding in his district.[9][10]

He was a delegate to the Democratic National Conventions in both 1956 and 1960.[11]

Civil rights

Morrison was one of the few southern Democrats to support President John F. Kennedy’s proposed civil rights legislation. In 1965, he voted for the Voting Rights Act, which many believe cost him his seat.[12]

Defeat and later career

In 1966, he was defeated in the Democratic primary election by Louisiana judge John R. Rarick, an ardent segregationist.[13]

After leaving Congress, he returned to Hammond to take up his law practice.[14] He became a prolific fundraiser and supporter of Southeastern Louisiana University, to which he had also steered federal contracts during his time in office.[15][16]

Death

James Morrison died in Hammond on July 20, 2000, following a series of health problems, including two heart attacks and a stroke. His body is interred at Episcopal Church Cemetery in Hammond.

He was survived by his wife of 60 years, Marjorie Abbey Morrison and their two sons, James Jr. and Benjamin.[17][18]

References

  1. ^ "Bioguide Search".
  2. ^ "Bioguide Search".
  3. ^ "Morrison obituary". New York Times. July 29, 2000.
  4. ^ "Longtime Louisiana Rep. James Morrison Dies". The Washington Post. July 23, 2000.
  5. ^ "Bioguide Search".
  6. ^ "Bioguide Search".
  7. ^ "Longtime Louisiana Rep. James Morrison Dies". The Washington Post. July 23, 2000.
  8. ^ "Morrison obituary". New York Times. July 29, 2000.
  9. ^ "Morrison obituary". New York Times. July 29, 2000.
  10. ^ "Longtime Louisiana Rep. James Morrison Dies". The Washington Post. July 23, 2000.
  11. ^ "Bioguide Search". Congressional Biographical Directory.
  12. ^ "Longtime Louisiana Rep. James Morrison Dies". The Washington Post. July 23, 2000.
  13. ^ "Morrison obituary". New York Times. July 29, 2000.
  14. ^ "Longtime Louisiana Rep. James Morrison Dies". The Washington Post. July 23, 2000.
  15. ^ "Morrison obituary". New York Times. July 29, 2000.
  16. ^ "Longtime Louisiana Rep. James Morrison Dies". The Washington Post. July 23, 2000.
  17. ^ "Morrison obituary". New York Times. July 29, 2000.
  18. ^ "Longtime Louisiana Rep. James Morrison Dies". The Washington Post. July 23, 2000.

Congressional Quarterly's Guide to Elections", Gubernatorial primary elections, 1940, 1944, 1948; Congressional general elections, 1960 and 1964

U.S. House of Representatives Preceded byJared Y. Sanders, Jr. Member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Louisiana's 6th congressional district 1943–1967 Succeeded byJohn Rarick