Jasmine Camacho-Quinn
Camacho-Quinn in 2018
Personal information
Full nameJasmine Camacho-Quinn
Born (1996-08-21) August 21, 1996 (age 25)
Charleston, South Carolina, United States[1]
Home townOrlando, FL
Height5 ft 8 in (173 cm)
Weight161 lb (73 kg)
Sport
CountryPuerto Rico
SportTrack and field
Event(s)
College teamKentucky Wildcats (2016–2018)[2]
TeamNike
Turned pro2018
Coached byJohn Coghlan
Achievements and titles
Highest world ranking
  • 100 m hurdles: 1st[3]
  • 200 m: 41st[3]
Personal best(s)
  • 100 m hurdles: 12.26 OR NR (2021)
  • 100 m: 11.22 NR) (2020)
  • 200 m: 22.45 (2020)
Updated on August 2, 2021.

Jasmine Camacho-Quinn (born August 21, 1996)[4] is a Puerto Rican[5][6][7] track and field athlete who specializes in the 100 metres hurdles. At the 2020 Tokyo Olympics, she became the second Puerto Rican ever to win a gold medal while representing Puerto Rico.[8] In the semi-finals, Camacho-Quinn set her personal best and Olympic record of 12.26 seconds, which is tied for the fourth fastest time in history.

Camacho-Quinn participated at the 2016 Rio Olympics in her specialty event, achieving 12.70 seconds in the heats, a time that would have secured her fifth place in the final. However, she was disqualified in the semi-finals after hitting a hurdle.

Progression

100 metres hurdles

Season Performance Place Date
2021 12.26 s OR, NR Tokyo 01/08/2021
2018 12.40 s Knoxville 13/05/2018
2016 12.69 s Tuscaloosa 14/05/2016
2014 13.37 s Renton 21/06/2014

100 metres

Season Performance Place Date
2014 11.66 s Columbia 15/05/2014
2013 11.90 s Hopkins 11/05/2013

200 metres

Season Performance Place Date
2016 22.87 s Jacksonville 27/05/2016
2014 23.77 s Columbia 17/05/2014
2013 24.34 s Hopkins 11/05/2013

Long jump

Season Performance Place Date
2014 6.15 m Columbia 17/05/2014
2013 5.98 m Hopkins 10/05/2013

Major achievements

Year Competition Venue Position Event Notes
2016[2] NCAA Division I Outdoor Track and Field Championships Oregon, United States 8th 200 m[10] 23.07
1st 100 m hurdles[11] 12.54
(wind: +3.8 m/s)
5th 4×100 m relay[12] 43.02
NACAC Under-23 Championships in Athletics San Salvador, El Salvador 1st 100 m hurdles 12.78
SEC Championships Alabama, United States 1st 12.69
3rd 4×100 m relay 43.55
4th 4×400 m relay 3:30.27
LSU Invitational Louisiana, United States 1st 100 m hurdles 12.73
(wind: +2.1 m/s)
12th 200 m 23.54
(wind: +2.0 m/s)
Virginia Challenge Virginia, United States 4th 100 m 11.61
1st 100 m hurdles 12.83
1st 4×400 m relay 3:34.40
Olympic Games Rio de Janeiro, Brazil – (semis) 100 m hurdles DQ R168.7b
2017 NCAA Division I Outdoor Track and Field Championships Oregon, United States 1st 4×100 m relay 42.51
2nd 100 m hurdles 12.58
(wind: +1.6 m/s)
2018 NCAA Division I Outdoor Track and Field Championships Oregon, United States 1st 100 m hurdles 12.70
(wind: +3.8 m/s)
2021 Golden Gala Pietro Mennea-Diamond League Event Florence, Italy 1st 100 m hurdles[13] 12.38
(wind: -0.8 m/s)
Olympic Games Tokyo, Japan 1st 100 m hurdles[14] 12.37
(wind: -0.3 m/s)

Personal life

Her parents are James Quinn, an African-American man, and María Milagros Camacho, a Puerto Rican woman. Both competed in athletics at Baptist College (now Charleston Southern University) in South Carolina, United States of America, with her father competing in hurdles and her mother as a sprint runner and long jumper.[15] Camacho-Quinn's mother, María Milagros Camacho, is from Trujillo Alto, Puerto Rico, which made Camacho-Quinn eligible to represent Puerto Rico in international competitions, including in the Olympics.[16][17] National Football League (NFL) player Robert Quinn is her brother.[18] Jasmine graduated from Fort Dorchester High School, in North Charleston, South Carolina.[19]

Identity

Born and raised in South Carolina, Camacho-Quinn decided later in life that she wanted to know more about her mother's side of the family, who live in Trujillo Alto, Puerto Rico.[20] She identifies as a Puerto Rican.[21] In July 2021, she tweeted about her mother, "You see my mommy? The PUERTO RICAN woman that birthed me?"[22] and stated "I am Puerto Rican" in a video posted by the Puerto Rican Olympic Committee.[23][24]

Camacho-Quinn is the first Afro-Puerto Rican to win a gold medal. This was celebrated by social anthropologist Bárbara Abadía-Rexach, who stated "Camacho-Quinn’s victory is a pioneering example for black girls on the island that shows them they can achieve whatever they set their minds to, despite the systemic barriers they will encounter due to their gender, race and ethnicity."[23]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Athlete profile – CAMACHO-QUINN Jasmine". Olympics.com. IOC. Archived from the original on 2021-08-04. Retrieved 2021-08-04.
  2. ^ a b "JASMINE CAMACHO-QUINN KENTUCKY". Track & Field Results Reporting System. Archived from the original on April 17, 2021. Retrieved April 17, 2021.
  3. ^ a b "Jasmine Camacho-Quinn". World Athletics. Archived from the original on June 27, 2021. Retrieved August 1, 2021.
  4. ^ "Jasmine Camacho-Quinn". Rio 2016. Archived from the original on August 16, 2016. Retrieved August 16, 2016.
  5. ^ "Jasmine Camacho-Quinn wins gold for Puerto Rico, sparking another identity debate". Los Angeles Times. 2021-08-02. Archived from the original on 2021-08-03. Retrieved 2021-08-04.
  6. ^ What Makes Someone Puerto Rican Enough? How About Winning Gold?. Adriana Rozas Rivera. Refinery29.com. 3 August 2021. Accessed 20 February 2022. Archived.
  7. ^ Who is Jasmine Camacho-Quinn? Puerto Rican athlete beats Keni Harrison to win 100m Olympic gold: Jasmine Camacho-Quinn beat record-holder Keni Harrison to win Puerto Rico's second-ever gold at the Olympics this year in Tokyo. Bhagyasri Chaudhury. MEA WorldWide. 1 August 2021. Accessed 20 February 2022. Archive.
  8. ^ "Tokyo 2020 - Jasmine Camacho-Quinn stuns world record holder Kendra Harrison to win gold in 100m hurdles". Eurosport. 2021-08-02. Archived from the original on 2021-08-04. Retrieved 2021-08-02.
  9. ^ "Jasmine CAMACHO-QUINN – Athlete Profile". World Athletics. Archived from the original on 29 October 2020. Retrieved 1 January 2021.
  10. ^ NCAA. "Women 200 M". ncaa.com. NCAA. Archived from the original on 19 September 2017. Retrieved 13 June 2016.
  11. ^ NCAA. "Women 100 M Hurdles". ncaa.com. NCAA. Archived from the original on 19 September 2017. Retrieved 13 June 2016.
  12. ^ NCAA. "Women 4x100 M Relay". ncaa.com. NCAA. Archived from the original on 19 September 2017. Retrieved 13 June 2016.
  13. ^ "100 Metres Hurdles women-Golden Gala Pietro Mennea". Track & Field Results Reporting System. Archived from the original on August 1, 2021. Retrieved August 1, 2021.
  14. ^ "100 Metres Hurdles at 2020 Summer Olympics". Olympic Results Reporting System. Archived from the original on August 2, 2021. Retrieved August 1, 2021.
  15. ^ "JASMINE CAMACHO-QUINN Olympic Profile". olympics.com. Archived from the original on August 1, 2021. Retrieved August 1, 2021.
  16. ^ "La familia de Jasmine Camacho-Quinn va a celebrar en grande: "Si ella gana, vamos a cerrar la calle"". El Nuevo Día (in Spanish). August 2021. Archived from the original on August 1, 2021. Retrieved August 1, 2021.
  17. ^ "Kentucky hurdler Jasmine Camacho-Quinn crashes out of semifinals". Kevin Tresolini. Archived from the original on December 20, 2016. Retrieved December 4, 2016.
  18. ^ "Jasmine Camacho-Quinn contará con el apoyo de su hermano". Primera Hora (in Spanish). 17 August 2016. Archived from the original on August 20, 2016. Retrieved August 18, 2016.
  19. ^ "Fort Dorchester High grad wins gold in women's 100-meter hurdles". 2 August 2021.
  20. ^ Meléndez-Badillo, Jorell (2021-08-05). "Perspective - Camacho-Quinn's gold medal sparked a debate about Puerto Rican national identity". Washington Post. Retrieved 2021-08-05.
  21. ^ Narvá, Carlos (2021-08-03). "Jasmine Camacho-Quinn: una boricua en la luna" [Jasmine Camacho-Quienn is a "Boricua en la luna" (Puerto Rican on the moon)]. El Vocero de Puerto Rico (in Spanish). Retrieved 2021-08-12.
  22. ^ "Jasmine Camacho-Quinn wins gold for Puerto Rico, sparking another identity debate". LA Times. 2 August 2021. Archived from the original on 2021-08-03. Retrieved 4 August 2021.
  23. ^ a b Ortis-Blanes, Syra; Méndez González, Luis Joel (August 3, 2021). "Hurdler Jasmine Camacho-Quinn wins second-ever gold medal for Puerto Rico". Miami Herald. Archived from the original on 2 August 2021. Retrieved 4 August 2021.
  24. ^ "Jasmine Camacho-Quinn y la diáspora boricua". YouTube. Comité Olímpico de Puerto Rico. Archived from the original on 2 August 2021. Retrieved 4 August 2021.

Videos

Records Preceded by Sally Pearson (AUS) Women's 100 m hurdles olympic record holder 1 August 2021 - present Incumbent